A Place Apart



[KINDLE] ❆ A Place Apart ❤ Dervla Murphy – E17streets4all.co.uk At the height of The Troubles, Dervla Murphy cycled to Northern Ireland to try to understand the situation by speaking to people on either side of the divide She also sought to interrogate her own opi At the height of The Troubles, Dervla Murphy cycled to Northern Ireland to try to understand the situation by speaking to people on either side of the divide She also sought to interrogate her own opinions and emotions As an Irishwoman and traveller who had only ever spent thirty six hours of her forty four years over the border to the north, why had she been A Place PDF/EPUB ² so reluctant to engage with the issues Despite her own family connections to the IRA, she travelled north largely unfettered by sectarian loyalties Armed instead with an indefatigable curiosity, a fine ear for anecdote, an ability to stand her own at the bar and a penetrating intelligence, she navigated her way through horrifying situations, and sometimes found herself among people stiff with hate and grief But equally, she discovered an unquenchable thirst for life and peace, a spirit that refused to die.A Place Apart

Dervla Murphy is an Irish touring cyclist and author of adventure travel books for over years She is best known for her book Full Tilt Ireland to India With a Bicycle, about an overland cycling trip through Europe, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Murphy is a famous speaker and writer on Palestinian issues She seeks the dissolution of Israel in its entiretyMurphy normally travels A Place PDF/EPUB ² alone and unaided, without luxuries and depending on the hospitality of local people When not travelling, Murphy lives in Lis, as she has for most of her life.

A Place Apart PDF/EPUB è A Place  PDF/EPUB ²
  • Hardcover
  • A Place Apart
  • Dervla Murphy
  • English
  • 07 June 2019
  • 0815965168

10 thoughts on “A Place Apart

  1. says:

    This book about Dervla Murphy s foray into Northern Ireland in 1978, right in the middle of The Troubles, is a sobering indictment of how the injunction to Love thy neighbour can go seriously wrong It s not a book that covers the history of The Troubles at depth, but I found excellent online resources from Wikipedia and the BBC that gave me the necessary overviews.The book is a series of interviews and conversations with people on both side of the divide These are accompanied by numerous and This book about Dervla Murphy s foray into Northern Ireland in 1978, right in the middle of The Troubles, is a sobering indictment of how the injunction to Love thy neighbour can go seriously wrong It s not a book that covers the history of The Troubles at depth, but I found excellent online resources from Wikipedia and the BBC that gave me the necessary overviews.The book is a series of interviews and conversations with people on both side of the divide These are accompanied by numerous and depressing descriptions the environment created by The Troubles boarded up pubs, burnt out cars and vandalised or deserted houses all positioned strictly in Catholic or Protestant ghettos, or in strips of no man s land which acted as buffers between them.The Catholics a one third minority in Northern Ireland undoubtedly had a hard time under the rule of the Protestants, with many unfair advantages accorded to the latter, but that began to change in the 1950s The post war British government introduced the Welfare State to Northern Ireland, and Catholic children were now able to benefit from further and higher education and it made them question the way things were Following political upheavals in 1963, The Troubles began, with the murder of two Catholics and a Protestant.By the time Dervla cycled into Northern Ireland in 1978 to write this book there had been bitterness and bloodshed between the Catholics and Protestents for fifteen long years The Protestents were basically a mix of Anglican and Presbyterian churches, with a smattering of other churches too, whilst the Catholics were all of a piece.Whilst Dervla asserts the right of Protestants to be in Northern Ireland they have been there longer than white American settlers have been in America she wonders at the insularity of their position, their insecurity at being a minor community in an overwhelmingly Catholic island, the virulent bigotry of many of their traditions, and their outlook generally Their commitment to Queen Elizabeth II and to being members of the United Kingdom is strong She presents the Catholics on the other hand as muchanarchic in various respects Their long time position as underdog in Northern Ireland has given them little respect for law and authority in any shape or form Thus the difference between the Protestants and Catholics comes across as being quite extreme Stuck in the middle were the British Army, sent in as peace keepers when the Northern Ireland government felt it could no longer control the situation They were particularly hated by the Catholics.Life in Northern Ireland at this time was also largely dominated by the various paramilitary groups fighting on both sides Not only did they run protection rackets for businesses, but also many ordinary people were expected to pay up in order to support their activities too They operated enthusiastically as vigilantethreatening and punishing anyone they believed were undermining their aims in any way be these people on the opposite side, or people on their own side whom they felt were not being vigorous enough in their condemnation of the enemy In a way no one was safe The paramilitary groups, whether on your own side or the other side, often operated much like gangsters Another issue in the book that touched me is the effect The Troubles had on the children the ever present sense of danger, the enticement to vandalism, the lawlessness in the no go areas, where even the soldiers were frightened to patrol It did not make for a pretty picture, not an environment where most people would want to bring up their kids.In the book nearly all of this is conveyed through conversations that Dervla has with various people As always this is her hallmark Talking to the ordinary person in the street about what they feel about the situation.For me this book was particularly disturbing because The Troubles happened just over the Irish Sea, right in my back yard It also left me with a huge sense of respect for all those involved with restoring peace to Northern Ireland Given the levels of animosity, violence and bad will that had gone on for decades described here so painfully well by Dervla it must have been a massive challenge for all parties.I thought this was an excellent read, it gives you a real flavour of what life must have been like in Northern Ireland during The Troubles

  2. says:

    In 1978, at the height of the Troubles , Dervla Murphy cycled to Northern Ireland She d already been to Afghanistan and Ethiopia, but this would be her first time in NI It seems like a historical account now hard to believe it happened within my lifetime Her sympathies areobviously with the green Catholic Republican part of the population, but her curiosity and goodwill helped her to make friends among the orange Protestant Unionist part as well She comes away with a feeling In 1978, at the height of the Troubles , Dervla Murphy cycled to Northern Ireland She d already been to Afghanistan and Ethiopia, but this would be her first time in NI It seems like a historical account now hard to believe it happened within my lifetime Her sympathies areobviously with the green Catholic Republican part of the population, but her curiosity and goodwill helped her to make friends among the orange Protestant Unionist part as well She comes away with a feeling of hope that would have been uncommon in that dark time I wonder if she s been to NI recently to see how much it s changed I certainly hope so

  3. says:

    On picking up this book randomly during my weekly bookshop wandering I started to read it and couldn t put it down, a cyclist and writer who during the height of The Troubles rode her bike over the border It is one of the most meaningful accounts of the troubles from an outsider I have ever read, and if you really want to get a feel for what the Troubles were like for all walks of life read this.

  4. says:

    Dervla Murphy has always been one of my favorite travel writers as she takes trips to places where others fear to go alone on a bicycle She has strong opinions but is also very non judgmental However, as an Irishwoman she had never been to Northern Ireland In the mid 1970s, at the height of The Troubles she took a number of trips up from her home in far southern Ireland and interviewed Catholics and Protestants about what life was like there and the roots of the hatred between the two communi Dervla Murphy has always been one of my favorite travel writers as she takes trips to places where others fear to go alone on a bicycle She has strong opinions but is also very non judgmental However, as an Irishwoman she had never been to Northern Ireland In the mid 1970s, at the height of The Troubles she took a number of trips up from her home in far southern Ireland and interviewed Catholics and Protestants about what life was like there and the roots of the hatred between the two communities Most of her discussions took places in pubs This book is an excellent study of conflict at a very local level, or within the different communities of Northern Ireland It reminded me of Jean Hatzfeld s study of how communities learned to live together in Rwanda after the Genocide While many things have changed in Northern Ireland since that time, in a visit to Northern Ireland this past summer, my wife and I sensed this tension everywhere we went in this Place Apart She captured the attitudes of the different communities well This ended up being muchof a political book than a travel book, but one that helps us to understand communities that live among each other but still remain so separate

  5. says:

    I need to knowhistory before I read this book.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *