Selected Poems



The Classic Volume By The Distinguished Modern Poet And Winner Of The Pulitzer Prize That Represents Her Technical Mastery, Her Compassionate And Illuminating Response To A World That Is Both Special And Universal, And Her Warm HumanitySelected Poems

Gwendolyn Brooks is the Pulitzer Prize winning author of Annie Allen and one of the most celebrated Black poets She also served as consultant in poetry to the Library of Congress the first Black woman to hold that position She was the poet laureate for the state of Illinois for over thirty years, a National Women s Hall of Fame inductee, and the recipient of a lifetime achievement award from the National Endowment for the Arts Her works include We Are Shining, Bronzeville Boys and Girls, A Street in Bronzeville, In the Mecca, The Bean Eaters, and Maud Martha.

[Ebook] Selected Poems By Gwendolyn Brooks – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 160 pages
  • Selected Poems
  • Gwendolyn Brooks
  • English
  • 12 December 2018
  • 0060931744

10 thoughts on “Selected Poems

  1. says:

    This is the first book of poetry I ve read in years I really enjoyed it One of my favourite poems in it was this one To be in loveIs to touch with a lighter hand.In yourself you stretch, you are well.You look at thingsThrough his eyes.A cardinal is red.A sky is blue.Suddenly you know he knows too.He is not there butYou know you are tasting togetherThe winter, or a light spring weather.His hand to take your hand is overmuch.Too much to bear.You cannot look in his eyesBecause your pulse must n This is the first book of poetry I ve read in years I really enjoyed it One of my favourite poems in it was this one To be in loveIs to touch with a lighter hand.In yourself you stretch, you are well.You look at thingsThrough his eyes.A cardinal is red.A sky is blue.Suddenly you know he knows too.He is not there butYou know you are tasting togetherThe winter, or a light spring weather.His hand to take your hand is overmuch.Too much to bear.You cannot look in his eyesBecause your pulse must not sayWhat must not be said.When heShuts a door Is not there_Your arms are water.And you are freeWith a ghastly freedom.You are the beautiful halfOf a golden hurt.You remember and covet his mouthTo touch, to whisper on.Oh when to declareIs certain Death Oh when to apprizeIs to mesmerize,To see fall down, the Column of Gold,Into the commonest ash

  2. says:

    These poems focus on the lives of black people, poor people, elderly people, disabled people, soldiers They do not shy away from difficult topics but do not sensationalize them, either one piece, titled the mother, begins starkly, Abortions do not let you forget Brooks inhabits the characters she writes about with a stirringly absolute empathy By shining on them the quiet light of her unostentatiously perfect prosody, she shows us that even society s most overlooked and alienated individu These poems focus on the lives of black people, poor people, elderly people, disabled people, soldiers They do not shy away from difficult topics but do not sensationalize them, either one piece, titled the mother, begins starkly, Abortions do not let you forget Brooks inhabits the characters she writes about with a stirringly absolute empathy By shining on them the quiet light of her unostentatiously perfect prosody, she shows us that even society s most overlooked and alienated individuals are grounded by an inner framework of dignity, that the insides of even the most downtrodden are lined by a nacreous grace Something we should all already know but are all occasionally guilty of forgetting Yet, as tender as she sometimes is, Brooks can also be pungently wry, stingingly acerbic, especially when casting her eye on the varied manifestations of racism Consider, for example, this stanza that she drops in an almost offhand way into the middle of the long poem The Sundays of Satin Legs Smith, an Eliot esque psychological analysis of a young black male character But movie time approaches, time to booThe hero s kiss, and boo the heroineWhose ivory and yellow it is sinFor his eye to eat of The Mickey Mouse,However, is for everyone in the house.With its craftsman like attentiveness to sonic detail, Brooks s language sometimes achieves an intricately filigreed, rococo grandeur that puts one in mind of the master goldsmiths of past centuries Vaunting hands are now devoid.Hieroglyphics of her eyesBlink upon a paradiseParalyzed and paranoid. from The Anniad Yet Brooks s verse is equally powerful when plainspoken, as in The Last Quatrain of the Ballad of Emmett Till and The Ballad of Rudolph Reed, two of the effective poems about American racism ever written.Maestro of every conceivable meter, from the ballad to the sonnet and beyond, Gwendolyn Brooks deserves better than to be labeled the finest black poet of her generation, as Robert F Kiernan s front cover blurb labels her Brooks is one of the finest poets of her generation, even of her century, period

  3. says:

    I had the honor and privilege of meeting Ms Brooks at a reading she gave at a local college in 1992 She was the first honest to God poet I ever met She was personable and down to Earth and, in her mid to late 70 s at the time, as sharp as the proverbial knife And she proceeded to give an hour reading which left everybody in that room a true blue fan of hers.Brooks poetry has a delightfully strange quality about it at once gentle and powerful, simultaneously spare and voluminous She says I had the honor and privilege of meeting Ms Brooks at a reading she gave at a local college in 1992 She was the first honest to God poet I ever met She was personable and down to Earth and, in her mid to late 70 s at the time, as sharp as the proverbial knife And she proceeded to give an hour reading which left everybody in that room a true blue fan of hers.Brooks poetry has a delightfully strange quality about it at once gentle and powerful, simultaneously spare and voluminous She saysin a few lines than many novelists say in doorstop thick tomes.There are breathing characters and multi level worlds contained in this verse If We Real Cool is the only poem of Brooks you know, then treat yourself and give this fine overview of her work a try

  4. says:

    Their retching rampage among their luminousBlack pudding, among the guttural chained slimeThe weary blues of the Middle Passage led to a poet saying, Nah This is a revolution a way of saying Enough, all the while parsing out the subsequent syllables of civilization Madame Brooks just beat down Robert Frost in the street of long form possibility It was interesting then that she devoted a poem to Frost, they appear to be so dissimilar I ve stayed in the front yard all my life.I want a peek at Their retching rampage among their luminousBlack pudding, among the guttural chained slimeThe weary blues of the Middle Passage led to a poet saying, Nah This is a revolution a way of saying Enough, all the while parsing out the subsequent syllables of civilization Madame Brooks just beat down Robert Frost in the street of long form possibility It was interesting then that she devoted a poem to Frost, they appear to be so dissimilar I ve stayed in the front yard all my life.I want a peek at the backWhere it s rough and untended and hungry weeds grow.A girl gets sick of a rose

  5. says:

    sadlylike 2.5 long, rhymed poems just really aren t my thing

  6. says:

    Gwendolyn Brooks should have been our Inaugural poet, if Clinton valued literature , politics less There s little comparison between her poetry and her sophomoric colleagues We real cool We alone stands as a prosodic and vocal breakthrough in American letters, the voice of the street in spondees, with the line end punctuating the street pause Wonderful, and enlightening Nobody knew you could capture the street in a brief lyric until she did Rappers would do well to master Brooks s Gwendolyn Brooks should have been our Inaugural poet, if Clinton valued literature , politics less There s little comparison between her poetry and her sophomoric colleagues We real cool We alone stands as a prosodic and vocal breakthrough in American letters, the voice of the street in spondees, with the line end punctuating the street pause Wonderful, and enlightening Nobody knew you could capture the street in a brief lyric until she did Rappers would do well to master Brooks spondees here But that s just the beginning of her accomplishment, as this selection shows As for inaugural poets, no politician since JFK had the political smarts to appoint an opponent a lifelong Republican to the post, perhaps because Frost s fame did not deter from the Office of President Now no one poet dominates like that, though Billy Collins is close And Gwendolyn Brooks made up in skill what she lacked in fame

  7. says:

    4.5 stars I mean, it s Gwendolyn Motherfucking Brooks.

  8. says:

    I finished this collection of selected poems by Gwendolyn Brooks I have got the habit now of reading a poem a day, usually before bed Eventhan fiction, a poem takes me out of my own head and into the poet s Ms Brooks was a phenom when it came to publishing books of poetry 19 of them She won a Pulitzer Prize in 1950, the first Black author to do so I am interested in telling my particular truth as I have seen it, she wrote Her truth comes from her life as a Black woman in America I finished this collection of selected poems by Gwendolyn Brooks I have got the habit now of reading a poem a day, usually before bed Eventhan fiction, a poem takes me out of my own head and into the poet s Ms Brooks was a phenom when it came to publishing books of poetry 19 of them She won a Pulitzer Prize in 1950, the first Black author to do so I am interested in telling my particular truth as I have seen it, she wrote Her truth comes from her life as a Black woman in America She only wrote one novel, Maud Martha, 1953 I liked it so much that for years I was upset she didn t writenovels I am no longer upset Her poems are just as good I hope one day to read all of those 19 books.So far in my poetry adventure I have read 20th century poets Now I am ready for the earlier works, the foundations of modern poetry I have dug out The Standard Book of British and American Verse from my shelves It begins with Chaucer 1340 1400 and ends with Vita Sackville West 1892 1962 On the advice of Christopher Morley, who wrote the preface, I am reading it back to front, so that you begin with the contemporary mood and gradually swim towards older words and manners, as he says It is a huge book, 735 pages It may take me the rest of my life to read I feel fine, after Gwendolyn Brooks s rendering of her American experience, about swimming towards earlier beginnings It is part of what we do as we age

  9. says:

    I don t know how old I was when I first read a poem by Gwendolyn Brooks 12, maybe 13 I don t know where I even found the poem But I do remember the specific poem, a song in the front yard, and I do remember reciting my favorite stanza I stayed in the front yard all my life I want a peek at the back Where it s rough and unattended and hungry weed grows A girl gets sick of a rose Of course, I didn t know about symbolism or other poetic devices at the time I just liked the music in her I don t know how old I was when I first read a poem by Gwendolyn Brooks 12, maybe 13 I don t know where I even found the poem But I do remember the specific poem, a song in the front yard, and I do remember reciting my favorite stanza I stayed in the front yard all my life I want a peek at the back Where it s rough and unattended and hungry weed grows A girl gets sick of a rose Of course, I didn t know about symbolism or other poetic devices at the time I just liked the music in her words And I loved the last line A girl gets sick of a rose I still love Gwendolyn Brooks I teach We Real Cool whenever I can, and many other of her poems have been added to my favorites list This past year, I made a resolution on my GoodReads reading group to readcollections from classic poets Brooks is one of the poets whose work I know however, I never read one of her collection in its entirety That s why I read her Selected Poems published by HarperCollins This collection offers segments from her many books including A Street in Bronzeville, Annie Allen and The Bean Eaters This book also contains a mini biography of Brooks life along with a tribute by Nikki Giovanni titled Remembering Gwen In short, this book offered a great time a chance to reread old favorites and be introduced to many of Brooks works I did not know

  10. says:

    I ve stayed in the front yard all my life.I want a peek at the backWhere it s rough and untended and hungry weeds grow.A girl gets sick of a rose From a song in the front yard in SELECTED POEMS by Gwendolyn Brooks Poems written and originally published 1944 1963, this edition by harperperennial 2006.This volume gathers poetry from 20 years of publications by Brooks, the first black Pulitzer Prize winner 1950 and one of the most renowned 20th century American poets.The slice of life poetI ve stayed in the front yard all my life.I want a peek at the backWhere it s rough and untended and hungry weeds grow.A girl gets sick of a rose From a song in the front yard in SELECTED POEMS by Gwendolyn Brooks Poems written and originally published 1944 1963, this edition by harperperennial 2006.This volume gathers poetry from 20 years of publications by Brooks, the first black Pulitzer Prize winner 1950 and one of the most renowned 20th century American poets.The slice of life poetry from her early works, A Street in Bronzeville and The Bean Eaters , were my favorites, and as well as her later elegies to some of her favorite poets, Robert Frost and Langston Hughes There s such power in her words, showing the lives of people in Chicago, Illinois, her life long home, her activism, and her interpretation of 20th century events like The Little Rock Nine, and the murder of Emmett Till.This edition included some fantastic supplemental materials a biography of Brooks, a commemoration by poet Nikki Giovanni, and the transcript of a radio interview and poetry reading with Studs Terkel from 1961.From that interview, Brooks clear and simple messageI myself have only tried to record life and interpret it as I have seen it

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