The Man of Stone



Minimally IllustratedThe Man of Stone

Howard Phillips Lovecraft, of Providence, Rhode Island, was an American author of horror, fantasy and science fiction.Lovecraft s major inspiration and invention was cosmic horror life is incomprehensible to human minds and the universe is fundamentally alien Those who genuinely reason, like his protagonists, gamble with sanity Lovecraft has developed a cult following for his Cthulhu Mythos, a series of loosely interconnected fictions featuring a pantheon of human nullifying entities, as well as the Necronomicon, a fictional grimoire of magical rites and forbidden lore His works were deeply pessimistic and cynical, challenging the values of the Enlightenment, Romanticism and Christianity Lovecraft s protagonists usually achieve the mirror opposite of traditional gnosis and mysticism by momentarily glimpsing the horror of ultimate reality.Although Lovecraft s readership was limited during his life, his reputation has grown over the decades He is now commonly regarded as one of the most influential horror writers of the 20th Century, exerting widespread and indirect influence, and frequently compared to Edgar Allan Poe Wikipedia

Download ➼ The Man of Stone Author H.P. Lovecraft – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Nook
  • 20 pages
  • The Man of Stone
  • H.P. Lovecraft
  • English
  • 01 February 2017

10 thoughts on “The Man of Stone

  1. says:

    First off I didn t read the Nook version listed I got it free from the HPL website NowHPL s collaborations with Hazel Heald spark some disagreements as to exactly what if anything she contributed Some say she supplied a rough plot and HPL ran with it Others say she did the first draft and HPL rewrote it THE MAN OF STONE provides an interesting source of speculation For starters it is totally unlike HPL in that it doesn t contain of the tongue twisting adjectives that make you rush for t First off I didn t read the Nook version listed I got it free from the HPL website NowHPL s collaborations with Hazel Heald spark some disagreements as to exactly what if anything she contributed Some say she supplied a rough plot and HPL ran with it Others say she did the first draft and HPL rewrote it THE MAN OF STONE provides an interesting source of speculation For starters it is totally unlike HPL in that it doesn t contain of the tongue twisting adjectives that make you rush for the dictionary that or simply throw up your hands and skip over them It is written in straight forward English with nothing to trip you up along the way Also the first third containsdialogue than one normally finds in his work But after that we default to the tried and true cliche diary entry which places us squarely in HPL territory as the person slowly and at great length outlines EVERY detail of what transpired And he tosses in the usual R Lyehian phrases altho this time not so many.I actually enjoyed the first third better than the rest Two guys explore a cave and find statues of a dog and a man only to learn they aren t statues after all but real creatures who have turned to stone How Was there some vapor in the cave that caused it It s an interesting premise that should have been put to better use Instead we get the evil descendant of an evil ancestor who passed down an evil book of spells blah blah blah.As many have said, second rate HPL is better than first rate fill in the blank But perhaps because this was a collaboration, and there are those who say HPL didn t really like Hazel Heald and did it strictly for the money, it may be he only put in enough effort to make a passable story that would sell.An okay effort, but certainly not a great one But at the same time, better than anything another so called King of the genre could come up with

  2. says:

    3.5 by H P Lovecraft and Hazel Heald The Man of Stone is one of those rare stories where a female character is not only in the background Don t get me wrong, this is only an observation since I don t give a damn about whether it s a man or a woman if the story is good Jack, the narrator and his friend Ben arrive in the small remote village to investigate a story about some life like stone statues They also want to find the sculptor Arthur Wheeler They know the man had disappeared somewhere i 3.5 by H P Lovecraft and Hazel Heald The Man of Stone is one of those rare stories where a female character is not only in the background Don t get me wrong, this is only an observation since I don t give a damn about whether it s a man or a woman if the story is good Jack, the narrator and his friend Ben arrive in the small remote village to investigate a story about some life like stone statues They also want to find the sculptor Arthur Wheeler They know the man had disappeared somewhere in that part of the country and they decide to investigate.The villagers warn them not to go to certain places and to keep away from Mad Dan s cabin in the woods It turns out that Arthur Wheeler, the missing sculptor, was Mad Dan s tenant for a while Nobody has seen Dan nor his wife for a very long time Of course Jack and Ben don t listen They can t stop now, especially when they find a statue of a dog in front of a cave and realize that it has to be a real animal somehow turned into stone Then they enter the cave itself and from there the whole horrible mess starts to unravel

  3. says:

    2,5

  4. says:

    Not the best of his I felt as if I knew already what was going to happen though I do have to admit the ending got me a little bit by surprise Enjoyable, at last, I didn t regret reading it It s not as horror, as terrifying as I expected it to be Suspenseful Maybe somewhat Just barely good, hardly passing the rating of nice or alright.

  5. says:

    Wordsworth EditionsLondon 2010.One of Lovecraft s western horror amalgams.The language is powerful and vivid It has high levels of vernacular in it The vernacular in all Lovecraft s opus could be seen as an antimodernist part of the vibe Why Because it is the vernacular of the countryside folk, mostly white, and what do liberals and feminist hatethan the countryside folk, especially white folk The deluded transgender totalitarians hate all people from the hamlets and fields, because t Wordsworth EditionsLondon 2010.One of Lovecraft s western horror amalgams.The language is powerful and vivid It has high levels of vernacular in it The vernacular in all Lovecraft s opus could be seen as an antimodernist part of the vibe Why Because it is the vernacular of the countryside folk, mostly white, and what do liberals and feminist hatethan the countryside folk, especially white folk The deluded transgender totalitarians hate all people from the hamlets and fields, because these people are the strongest force of normality and freedom Leftists hate freedom, leftist want control and slavery What isfree than a family with plenty toddlers and a strong father figure What isnormal than that Feminism, like all totalitarian ideologies, hates family, because with strong families how can one become a pious social justice warrior How can one love the State, love Babylon if he loves most his family How can one question his gender if he was loved by his family That is the main reason to destroy family, family is freedom, family is rebelliion in today s degenerate sustainable and feminist world.But let me show you an example of a vernacular in this novella Wheeler he had finally wheezed Oh, yeh that feller as was all the time blastin rocks and cuttin em into statues So yew knowed him, hey Vernacular never has newspeak in it, not any gender neutral neologisms.Lexically the world feller stands as a vernacular form of the standard fellow Morphologically we got her blastin and cuttin as an abstract vernacular phenomenon The most outstanding morphological example is yew an adjective verb amalgam that I as a Croat never before encountered.And the content This novella depicts devilish queer conditions up there A remote area full of Indian legends and a modern sceptic protagonist who will realise how rationalism is naive.It has a stronger psychologicalhorrorlike nature about it than you usually find in Lovercraft.I recommend it

  6. says:

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  7. says:

    You can tell which parts are not Lovecraft because there is a female character who is not a mother, and she has feelings and they are actually significant to the plot.I wonder if this petrifaction formula is related to the one in The King in Yellow If so, does that mean view spoiler it will eventually wear off dun nun NUHN sequel hide spoiler or does it work differently if you drink it instead of bathe in it You can tell which parts are not Lovecraft because there is a female character who is not a mother, and she has feelings and they are actually significant to the plot.I wonder if this petrifaction formula is related to the one in The King in Yellow If so, does that mean view spoiler it will eventually wear off dun nun NUHN sequel hide spoiler or does it work differently if you drink it instead of bathe in it

  8. says:

    A local bad man, literally named Mad Dan by neighbours discovers through books of black magic left by distant relatives how to turn living things into stone.He uses this to wreak havoc on his lodger who is a sculptor, and his wife who has formed a strong attachment to the new occupant of the house.Enjoyable and original horror.

  9. says:

    This was an interesting one Muchof a mystery story than usual, with a direct series of events and an unambiguous ending It s also one of the only times Lovecraft wrote a female character who is not only prominent but agent, and outwits her male counterpart I like the way the story was delivered, too.

  10. says:

    Enjoyable tale that suffers from being framed as an investigative mystery rather than just, say, alternating between two diaries, maybe with an occasional newspaper article Cruel husband gets his just deserts, but too late to save his victims.

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