Gargantua



❮PDF / Epub❯ ☄ Gargantua ✑ Author François Rabelais – E17streets4all.co.uk As a companion volume to Pantagruel, this new edition of Gargantua continues Rabelais acclaimed fantasy of a mythical family of giants Gargantua introduces Pantagruel s father another wondrous giant A As a companion volume to Pantagruel, this new edition of Gargantua continues Rabelais acclaimed fantasy of a mythical family of giants Gargantua introduces Pantagruel s father another wondrous giant As he tells Gargantua s life story from his birth and education to his later life, Rabelais uses the events of the giant s life to parody medieval and classical learning, mock traditional ecclesiastical authority, and proffer his own thoughts on humanism and society Marked with the same warm humor, obsession with food, and scatological wit of Pantagruel, Gargantua is a further striking burlesque on Rabelais contemporaries and a glorious outpouring of Renaissance plenitude.Gargantua

Fran ois Rabelais was a major French Renaissance writer, doctor and Renaissance humanist He has historically been regarded as a writer of fantasy, satire, the grotesque, and both bawdy jokes and songs Rabelais is considered one of the great writers of world literature and among the creators of modern European writing.

Paperback  ↠ Gargantua MOBI ò
  • Paperback
  • 176 pages
  • Gargantua
  • François Rabelais
  • English
  • 22 April 2019
  • 1843910578

10 thoughts on “Gargantua

  1. says:

    They lived and laughed and loved and leftJames JoyceWhen I glance through the reviews in my goodreads updates, the words tears and moving sometimes jump out at me, and my first impulse is to look away quickly But the next impulse is to look again to see what it is that has caused the reviewer to be quite so moved that they have actually shed tears Sometimes the reviewer explains what has moved them in a way that allows me to gain an insight into the powerful writing that has produced s They lived and laughed and loved and leftJames JoyceWhen I glance through the reviews in my goodreads updates, the words tears and moving sometimes jump out at me, and my first impulse is to look away quickly But the next impulse is to look again to see what it is that has caused the reviewer to be quite so moved that they have actually shed tears Sometimes the reviewer explains what has moved them in a way that allows me to gain an insight into the powerful writing that has produced such an intense reaction At other times, I m at a complete loss I do not even begin to comprehend what has produced all the tears, and then I feel a huge gulf between me and the book itself, certain that my reaction would be rather one of laughter, that I would not be able to take such tear inducing scenarios seriously and therefore ought not to read the book Il vaut mieux traiter du rire que des larmes,Parce que rire est le propre de l hommeIt s better to write about laughter than tears,For laughter makes men human Fran ois RabelaisIt s true that I mdrawn to authors who keep their tongues firmly in their cheeks when it comes to the tragic and the shocking, rather than to those who favour describing the shocking and the tragic in shockingly tragic language Several writers I admire are masters at wrapping the tragic in comic garb When I paused just now to think of names to back up that statement, I came up with a curious group Laurence Sterne, for example, and Jonathan Swift Flann O Brien and Samuel Beckett What is curious about the group is that they are all Irish or at least born in Ireland It makes me wonder if there isn t something special in Hibernian air, some earthy element that floats about and encourages a focus on the contradictory, the irreverent, the ribald, the downright scatalogical And that thought brings me by an odious ficafist of literary recirculation back to James Joyce with whom I began this review and whom I always considered the most wonderfully irreverent and scatological of the above group That was the case until I met Rabelais What Joyce can do easily, Rabelais can do with one fist tied behind his back, his thumb protruding between his fingers He s a gargantuan figure in this group of literary giants, and for me, he ll belong in their company from here on in.Of course the big obstacle to grouping him with Joyce company is that he s not Irish and never had the opportunity to inhale the island s earthy element, at least as far as anyone knows, though I personally wouldn t be surprised to hear he was fathered by an Irish monk who travelled through the Loire Valley on his way to Compostela, and who spent a night or two in a hostelry in Chinon perhaps, and who may also have eventually met up with Cervantes mother while he loitered in Spain because Cervantes could easily belong in this group too That scenario might explain why Rabelais is so severe on pilgrims, certain that they would do better to stay at home and mind their own business instead of roaming the world meddling in other people s lives It might also explain why Rabelais became a monk, because clearly, he had no inclination towards obedience, chastity or penance of any kind But without proof for such speculation, the only solution is to make Rabelais an honorary Irishman, which I hereby ordain, rabelaisian being another word for earthy when all is dead and sung.In any case, Rabelais influence, his pantagruelisme , can be seen clearly in the work of these Irish writers Some critics claim that Joyce never read Rabelais Be that whatever truth it is, I found many parallels in the themes and writing styles of both authors Apart from their use of satire against church and state, they each thread jokes and opportunities for laughter into all sorts of subjects even those that touch on serious issues like illness and death They particularly enjoy spoonerisms contrep terie and wordplay of all sorts, in multiple languages en plus, and they make frequent references to bodily organs and functions, especially excremental ones Rabelais really enjoys giving us the details of his characters bowel movements, and in fact, the one reference to Ireland I found in his work is a scene where Panurge shits himself in fear and then tries to pretend that the smell is Irish Saffron C est sapphran d Hibernie , he shouts triumphantly after denying it could possibly be any of a long list of words for turds in several languages.The parallels I ve mentioned regarding Rabelais and Joyce can be found in the work of the other writers in my group to greater and lesser extents Laurence Sterne claimed that Rabelais was his favourite writer, and the influence can be seen in the pleasure Sterne takes in the ribald and the absurd even though Rabelais world of giants and battles is a far cry from the intimate scenes Sterne created in Tristram Shandy On second thoughts, there are battles in Sterne s work too, it s just that they are waged in the smaller domestic arena between Tristram s mother and father or in his Uncle Toby s garden, while the gigantic wars fought by Gargantua and his followers actually have their origin in the stealing of a couple of loaves of bread from a smalltime baker So the themes aresimilar then dissimilar And both authors focus on the birth of their main characters, determined to describe the details as bawdily and repulsively as possible.As in Sterne, there is also a preoccupation in Samuel Beckett s work with the details of birth In the case of characters like Molloy, for instance, and the Unnamable, the details have all the grotesqueness we find in Rabelais, as in characters not being born quite in the usual way In fact Beckett, with his focus on the body and its functions, came to mind several times while I was reading Rabelais, especially when I came across the many examples of propos torcheculatifs toilet talk Jonathan Swift and Rabelais have toilet talk and double meaning language in common but also a giant theme, friendly giants in each case, though Gulliver is perhapstimorous than Gargantua or Pantagruel But since Swift liked to satirise everything that could be satirised he resembles Rabelais most in that aspect of his writing The last of the group, but by no lean feasts, is Flann O Brien Flann and Rabelais share an interest in describing food, though it may be of slightly different quality in each case They each have a love of wordplay, and sentences containing lists, and both enjoy creating fantastical worlds And of course they both have a strong inclination towards earthy humour However, and this thought struck me in a very serendipsodic manner since by chance I d begun reading one of Flann s books while reading about Pantagruel in the Land of the Dipsodes, there is one aspect of Flann s writing which links him to Rabelais most particularly and indeed allows Rabelais the strongest claim to honorary Irishness the important role given to drinking in the text Each is a bon videur de pintes, a pint of plain for Flann, a pint of pur e de septembre for Rabelais, his favourite term for wine The author narrator of Gargantua and Pantagruel is called Alcofribas and is referred to as an abstracteur de quinte essence on the title page While many would see that as a reference to alchemy or philosophy, I think it s quite simply a reference to his main preoccupation distilling the fifth essence, alcohol The language of the text recalls constantly the language of wine making from tramping the grapes to the final drinking process Common notions are transformed where possible Pandora s box becomes Pandora s bottle, for example Many scenarios begin or end with a description of the amount of wine being drunk or about to be drunk or just having been drunk Rabelais addresses us not as readers but as buveurs or drinkers, and he reminds us that it is while he is drinking that he reflects on the world and makes up his stories, and that while writing them down he laughs at life and continues drinking.So in honour of these writing heroes and heroic drinkers, who ve quaffed and laughed and loved and left,I ve created a venue where they can all hang out together and talk about drinking and writing and laughing and drinking Chateau Rabelais view image view spoiler hide spoiler Rabelais creates a really funny scenario involving a debate between a French man and an English man consisting entirely of hand signs The signs, including a ficafist , thumb protruding between the index and middle finger, are openly insolent, especially on the part of the Frenchman example of Rabelais contrep terie femme folle la messe becomes femme molle la fesse a mad women at mass becomes a woman with a sad ass or at least that s my version of Rabelais contrep terie which is an apt word in the circumstances because it encompasses a fart pet and Rabelais loves fart jokes Flann O Brian enjoys the art of contrep terie too, and especially if it concerns anything rude There s a phrase in Irish, N l aon tinte n mar do thinte in fein which means there s no fireplace like your own fireplace or no place like home which Flann spoonerises as follows N l aon t n tinn mar do th in tinn fein which means there s no sore ass like your own sore ass Alcofribas is listed as the author of Gargantua and of Pantagruel but Rabelais signed his own name to the final three books in the series In any case, Alcofribas Nasier is an anagram of Fran ois Rabelais.Image source The image is part alcolised, part apped I used acrylics to paint the bottle and background, mixing sediment from the bottom of a wine bottle into the paint It started out as a joke present to someone who gave me a very special bottle of wine I took a photo of the painting and changed a few details including the thank you label, using the art studio app, and so the bottle was recycled for rabelaisian purposes..Edit September 21st 2016 found another reference to Ireland, this time in Le Cinqui me Livre durant cette descente il ne nous apparaissait pas d autre lumi re, pas plus que si nous avions t dans le trou de saint Patrick en IrlandeReview of Pantagruel

  2. says:

    This was one crazy story It s very reminiscent of Voltaire s Candide but with a great many lewd jokes and a lot of dirty humour.It s bawdy, yes, but it also offers some philosophical insights into society It s hard to believe that this book was written over 5 centuries ago.

  3. says:

    I enjoyed thisthan Pantagruel, which was written earlier but set later Gargantua is better plotted Amongst the extravagant, obscene, bawdy nonsense, it includes an almost serious account of the title character s education, which consists not of rote drills, but of puzzles and games to learn math, readings and discussions for the humanities, visits to craftsmen to learn practical arts, all at a pace to suit the taste of the scholar One wonders if Rabelais seriously thought such an educat I enjoyed thisthan Pantagruel, which was written earlier but set later Gargantua is better plotted Amongst the extravagant, obscene, bawdy nonsense, it includes an almost serious account of the title character s education, which consists not of rote drills, but of puzzles and games to learn math, readings and discussions for the humanities, visits to craftsmen to learn practical arts, all at a pace to suit the taste of the scholar One wonders if Rabelais seriously thought such an education would work It seems not Gargantua learns fencing by dropping in at a salle every once in a while, when it is raining He astonishes the master with his skill, but any other fencer could hardly progress with such a lackadaisacal program I think maybe what Rabelais is saying is, Wouldn t it be grand if we could learn like this And maybe that some elements of Gargantua s education could be included into the curricula of his time with profit.Similarly with the great war Gargantua wages Wouldn t it be grand if wars could end with the enemy swiftly defeated, the one who caused the war escaping to become a bitter day laborer in Lyon, and the defeated army reconciled by our mercy

  4. says:

    In 1980, the comic strip of Dino Battaglia appeared in Italy after the work of Rabelais.The author is accustomed adaptations of literary works.2001 will see the publication in French of the drawings accompanied by the arranged text see for this purpose the explanatory forewords of the genesis of the work and the posthumous adaptation What great gullet you have baptized Grandgousier at the birth of his son Gargantua.The first part of the collection tells us about childhood, adolescence an In 1980, the comic strip of Dino Battaglia appeared in Italy after the work of Rabelais.The author is accustomed adaptations of literary works.2001 will see the publication in French of the drawings accompanied by the arranged text see for this purpose the explanatory forewords of the genesis of the work and the posthumous adaptation What great gullet you have baptized Grandgousier at the birth of his son Gargantua.The first part of the collection tells us about childhood, adolescence and maturity of the giant hero.His education sponsored by the humanist Ponocrates, his departure for Paris the episode of Notre Dame is edifying , his many learnings where we see here the pedagogy advocated by Rabelais in addition to studies, lessons of things , lessons of life in opposition with the rigorous teaching, ex cathedra of Sorbonnards.Gargantua returns to the country when the picrocholine war breaks out, one perceives in the father as in the son a reflection different from the obscurantism of the attackers.Also appears the famous Brother Jean of Entommeures, monk of action in a century blinded by a dominant and domineering religion.The Middle Ages ends, the sixteenth century is announced references to medicine Rabelais was a doctor , geographical discoveries, good food famine the outline of the humanist spirit.It is particularly seen in the second part devoted to Pantagruel, son of the previous one.Wars, travels, meetings and quest are the path of the heir of Grandgousier and Gargantua.We meet Panurge whose name is always quotedThroughout this book wager, we find excerpts from the original text in modernized French and the popular rabelaisian truculence that can still disturb the cold minds.The drawings of the Italian master of the ninth art, Dino Battaglia, with the coloring of Laure, his companion, are a delight.Perfectly adapted to the story, they break the habits of the comics, go beyond the traditional frameworks and we restore the gigantism of the heroes, the wars, the movements and the noises.Laughs and reflections are at the rendezvous and in the text and in the illustration

  5. says:

    Gargantua was printed and edited first in 1534 1535, printing had just been invented, Pantagruel, son of Gargantua, was published first in 1532 By Fran ois Rabelais, 1495 1553 America had just been discovered, To make any sense of the works of Rabelais, we must take into account the historical environment of his time Religious inquisitions could and still did lead to accusation of heresy, the convicted would be burned alive in public.Braving these dangers, Rabelais whirled up a literary du Gargantua was printed and edited first in 1534 1535, printing had just been invented, Pantagruel, son of Gargantua, was published first in 1532 By Fran ois Rabelais, 1495 1553 America had just been discovered, To make any sense of the works of Rabelais, we must take into account the historical environment of his time Religious inquisitions could and still did lead to accusation of heresy, the convicted would be burned alive in public.Braving these dangers, Rabelais whirled up a literary dust storm.He imagined his supersized, larger than life, stronger than Hercules, not intelligent, but good natured heroes, Gargantua and Pantagruel, son of Gargantua They could eat and drink especially drink from morning to night, smash any castle, beat any army, outsmart any aggression, in short, were invincible In a humorous, witty, farcical, funny and even low and dirty language, exempt of all moral and psychology, he invented new words and expressions, often taken from popular origins, in short, the author wants his readers to laugh out loud.Then, smartly woven into of the adventurous events of the story, the attentive reader will notice the heroes lash out critics against lying preachers, lazy monks, stealing lawyers, stupid aristocrats, and mad kings etc.It takes some time to get used to the language at first, but these works are a literary milestone and therefore a MUST READ on my list It appears that Cervantes with his Don Quixote, fifty years after Rabelais, worked on a similar idea

  6. says:

    I had much, much higher expectations I was expecting something similar to Voltaire s Zadig which I adored Something with a much greater idea.Honestly This is only making fun of certain aspects of 16th century French society I found no philosophy hidden in this book that might have made it worthwhile It is supposed to be fun Parody and stuff But really, I just found it incredibly dull I took TWO weeks to read the 70 pages that constitute this book My point is, this was boring Not in a I had much, much higher expectations I was expecting something similar to Voltaire s Zadig which I adored Something with a much greater idea.Honestly This is only making fun of certain aspects of 16th century French society I found no philosophy hidden in this book that might have made it worthwhile It is supposed to be fun Parody and stuff But really, I just found it incredibly dull I took TWO weeks to read the 70 pages that constitute this book My point is, this was boring Not in an it was a bit too serious or I like YA better way I was not expecting action packed chapters and beautiful metaphors or anything I was ready for an average, educational read But I learned NOTHING from it and I enjoyed no second of it So Pointless read for me

  7. says:

    When I started to read the book, I was surprised to see that the book isn t like it was written in the 16th century at all It is adaptable to all ages and its absurdity was funny in the 16th century, and it is funny in the 21st century as well.

  8. says:

    Review of the Burton Raffel translation The book is at it s strongest with the ridiculous imagery and farcical situations the impetus for the war between Grandgousier Pichrocole, Gargantua s horse pissing a flood downing thousands of soldiers, a seemingly indestructible not so monkish, Brother John, etc The vignettes such as Gargantua eating pilgrims in a salad, or using a giant tree as his staff are very good.Unfortunately, the book is repetitious to an ingratiating extent There is an on Review of the Burton Raffel translation The book is at it s strongest with the ridiculous imagery and farcical situations the impetus for the war between Grandgousier Pichrocole, Gargantua s horse pissing a flood downing thousands of soldiers, a seemingly indestructible not so monkish, Brother John, etc The vignettes such as Gargantua eating pilgrims in a salad, or using a giant tree as his staff are very good.Unfortunately, the book is repetitious to an ingratiating extent There is an ongoing gag of saying long sentences in Latin and then immediately saying it in English this could be a translation thing , but what definitely isn t are his infamous lists You will be bombarded with every type of thing in a category If someone mentions a bird, you will be given a list of ten to fifteen different types of birds they have or possess There is also a running gag , I guess, of being precise with large amounts of things money, soldiers, etc This is present throughout the entire book Because of the Rabelasian lists, the book became a chore to read, but the book contains memorable moments and if you let your eyes skim over the pointless lists, it will be a lotenjoyable I felt like it was funny at first, but Rabelais doesn t seem to know when a joke is dead I suspect this continues in the next four books

  9. says:

    I didn t read this particular edition I read from the Great Works books.The whole story is hyperbole It s satire It s supposed to be irreverent and funny Some of the word combinations are unusual and its lists sometimes made me feel like I was reading a thesaurus There s what I d call eleven year old boy humor full of cod pieces, private parts, and rivers of urine For some reason I kind of like when Gargantua eats the salad and happens to eat six or so people at the same time who survive, I didn t read this particular edition I read from the Great Works books.The whole story is hyperbole It s satire It s supposed to be irreverent and funny Some of the word combinations are unusual and its lists sometimes made me feel like I was reading a thesaurus There s what I d call eleven year old boy humor full of cod pieces, private parts, and rivers of urine For some reason I kind of like when Gargantua eats the salad and happens to eat six or so people at the same time who survive, of course.The book is about a giant, Gargantua It follows his outrageous birth, his education, goes through a war started because of cakes, and then to an abbey which is established after the battle is won in part thanks to a monk Because of the monk s help, he is given the reward of being able to establish an over the top, extravagant, anti religious abbey where the only rule is something like, Do whatever you want I can t say I liked it I didn t hate it I was glad to finally finish reading it

  10. says:

    Well, this was quite odd This is a famous French renaissance novel, and I didn t know what to expect Turns out that this is a crossover between an insolent satire, knight novel, fairytale, and didactic writing And first thing that you realise about it is that it is one of the most saucy novels with such an over the top squeamish humour concerning every known bodily fluid, that it would be considered trash if published today, under a modern name.But I had no problem with it s bodily fluid obss Well, this was quite odd This is a famous French renaissance novel, and I didn t know what to expect Turns out that this is a crossover between an insolent satire, knight novel, fairytale, and didactic writing And first thing that you realise about it is that it is one of the most saucy novels with such an over the top squeamish humour concerning every known bodily fluid, that it would be considered trash if published today, under a modern name.But I had no problem with it s bodily fluid obssession In fact, I found it the better part of the book Things such as overeating until vomiting, being drunk all the time and cursing god and saints, shitting diarrhea in the woods until your intestines burst and wiping your ass with skins of every imaginable animal are common themes in this novel Fun and grotesque, to say at least And clergy is pictured as a bunch of greedy, insolent and half retarded idiots.The problem is that only a half of the book is that entertaining The second half is like written by another person grotesque jokes cease almost entirely as an endlessly boring war creeps into the narration Also, the book tries to be didactic all of the sudden, after all that hillarious fart, shit, piss and cock jokes And it doesn t work It simply begins to get boring

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *