Javatrekker: Dispatches from the World of Fair Trade Coffee



In Each Cup Of Coffee We Drink The Major Issues Of The Twenty First Century Globalization, Immigration, Women S Rights, Pollution, Indigenous Rights, And Self Determination Are Played Out In Villages And Remote Areas Around The World In Javatrekker Dispatches From The World Of Fair Trade Coffee, A Unique Hybrid Of Fair Trade Business, Adventure Travel, And Cultural Anthropology, Author Dean Cycon Brings Readers Face To Face With The Real People Who Make Our Morning Coffee Ritual PossibleSecond Only To Oil In Terms Of Its Value, The Coffee Trade Is Complex With Several Levels Of Middlemen Removing The Million Growers In Fifty Distant Countries Far From You And Your Morning Cup And, According To Cycon, Percent Of The People Involved In The Coffee Economy Have Never Been To A Coffee Village They Let Advertising And Images From The Major Coffee Companies Create Their WorldviewCycon Changes That In This Compelling Book, Taking The Reader On A Tour Of Ten Countries In Nine Chapters Through His Passionate Eye And Unique Perspective Cycon, Who Is Himself An Amalgam Equal Parts Entrepreneur, Activist, And Mischievous Explorer Has Traveled Extensively Throughout The World S Tropical Coffeelands, And Shows Readers Places And People That Few If Any Outsiders Have Ever Seen Along The Way, Readers Come To Realize The Promise And Hope Offered By Sustainable Business Principles And The Products Derived From Cooperation, Fair Pricing, And Profit SharingCycon Introduces Us To The Mamos Of Colombia Holy Men Who Believe They Are Literally Holding The World Together Despite The Severe Effects Of Climate Change Caused By Us, Their Younger Brothers He Takes Us On A Trip Through An Ancient Forest In Ethiopia Where Many Believe That Coffee Was First Discovered , Years Ago By The Goatherd Kaldi And His Animals And Readers Learn Of Mexico S Infamous Death Train, Which Transported Countless Immigrants From Central America Northward To The US Border, But Took A Horrifying Toll In Lost Lives And Limbs Rich With Stories Of People, Landscapes, And Customs, Javatrekker Offers A Deep Appreciation And Understanding Of The Global Trade And Culture Of CoffeeIn Each Cup Of Coffee We Drink The Major Issues Of The Twenty First Century Globalization, Immigration, Women S Rights, Pollution, Indigenous Rights, And Self Determination Are Played Out In Villages And Remote Areas Around The WorldWhat Is Fair Trade Coffee Coffee Prices Paid To The Farmer Are Based On The International Commodity Price For Coffee The C Price And The Quality Premium Each Farmer Negotiates Fair Trade Provides An Internationally Determined Minimum Floor Price When The C Plus Premium Sinks Below Per Pound For Conventional And For Organics That S Us As Important As Price, Fair Trade Works With Small Farmers To Create Democratic Cooperatives That Insure Fair Dealing, Accountability And Transparency In Trade Transactions In An Industry Where The Farmer Is Traditionally Ripped Off By A Host Of Middlemen, This Is Tremendously ImportantCooperatives Are Examined By The Fairtrade Labeling Organization FLO , Or The International Fair Trade Association IFAT , European NGOs, For Democratic Process And Transparency Those That Pass Are Listed On The FLO Registry Or Become IFAT Members Cooperatives Provide Important Resources And Organization To Small Farmers In The Form Of Technical Assistance For Crop And Harvest Improvement, Efficiencies In Processing And Shipping, Strength In Negotiation And An Array Of Needed Social Services, Such As Health Care And Credit Fair Trade Also Requires Pre Financing Of Up To Sixty Percent Of The Value Of The Contract, If The Farmers Ask For It Several Groups, Such As Ecologic And Green Development Fund Have Created Funds For Pre Finance LendingJavatrekker: Dispatches from the World of Fair Trade Coffee

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  • Paperback
  • 239 pages
  • Javatrekker: Dispatches from the World of Fair Trade Coffee
  • Dean Cycon
  • English
  • 22 February 2017
  • 1933392703

10 thoughts on “Javatrekker: Dispatches from the World of Fair Trade Coffee

  1. says:

    Three things I liked about the book 1 The good things he accomplishes for coffee farmers and amputees 2 His sense of humor 3 His sense of perspective He gets a little anti American and anti capitalistic sometimes we ve earned it but he doesn t gloss over the dictators, the thugs, the weapons, the crimes, revolutionaries and counterrevolutionaries or even the eccentricities and anti socialism of the people in the countries in which he works He is pretty good at laughing at himself a Three things I liked about the book 1 The good things he accomplishes for coffee farmers and amputees 2 His sense of humor 3 His sense of perspective He gets a little anti American and anti capitalistic sometimes we ve earned it but he doesn t gloss over the dictators, the thugs, the weapons, the crimes, revolutionaries and counterrevolutionaries or even the eccentricities and anti socialism of the people in the countries in which he works He is pretty good at laughing at himself and not running other people or their religions or social or government systems down He takes us into Ethiopia, Kenya, Columbia, Peru, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Mexico, El Salvador, Sumatra and Papa New Guinea His business is coffee, his company is Dean s Beans and his motive is helping people Put it all together and he calls it Javatrekking My coffee, Tony s Espresso Noir, is fair trade but it doesn t say on the bag where the beans were grown One note needs better editing On the death train and amputee section Dean writes about a coffee farmer from Honduras and says, Things got quiet as Wilmer looked down at two stumps cut off above where his knees were There is a picture of Wilmer in the book and he is missing one leg from above the knee The other leg is whole and intact as you can see as he is wearing shorts

  2. says:

    I have to admit I was a bit reluctant to read this book at first, as I am not the biggest fan of nonfiction and as it sometimes turned out to hold an agenda of its own However, I stand corrected and Javatrekker impressed me There is so little we know about where our coffee comes from and about the way of life of people that plant and harvest it, then intermediate its route to our cups El Tren de la Muerte was what touched me the most, but nonetheless there are heartwarming and even funny stor I have to admit I was a bit reluctant to read this book at first, as I am not the biggest fan of nonfiction and as it sometimes turned out to hold an agenda of its own However, I stand corrected and Javatrekker impressed me There is so little we know about where our coffee comes from and about the way of life of people that plant and harvest it, then intermediate its route to our cups El Tren de la Muerte was what touched me the most, but nonetheless there are heartwarming and even funny stories throughout the book

  3. says:

    An Amazing read This book will tell you what really happened, so that you could get your morning coffee See the highs and lows, Amazing true stories of coffee farmers from all over the world A real gem I brought this book from my local Trade Aid shop with my birthday money and I plan on registering the book on www.Bookcrossing.com and sending it on it s own adventure, to help spread the word An Amazing read This book will tell you what really happened, so that you could get your morning coffee See the highs and lows, Amazing true stories of coffee farmers from all over the world A real gem I brought this book from my local Trade Aid shop with my birthday money and I plan on registering the book on www.Bookcrossing.com and sending it on it s own adventure, to help spread the word

  4. says:

    This was a very interesting book but somehow it took me much longer to read than expected and I can t figure out why Maybe it has to do with me been quite preoccupied with other stuff right now, I don t know.I didn t have specific expectations from the book, so I found it an interesting insight on coffee industry, Fair Trade movement and indigenous people s coffee farmers lives around the world, still I found it a bit all over the place Javatrekker This was a very interesting book but somehow it took me much longer to read than expected and I can t figure out why Maybe it has to do with me been quite preoccupied with other stuff right now, I don t know.I didn t have specific expectations from the book, so I found it an interesting insight on coffee industry, Fair Trade movement and indigenous people s coffee farmers lives around the world, still I found it a bit all over the place Javatrekker Dispatches from the World of Fair Trade Coffee doesn t seem to focus enough on each issue, so someone unfamiliar with the topic can hardly get a deeper understanding on things The book consists of snippets from Dean Cycon s experiences all around the world which aren t detailed enough to getthan a glimpse on each issue area, while the author doesn t restrict his self on the coffee production and coffee trade field, but roams on other fields too Interesting fields for sure, but the book feels somehow fragmental There is core material for several different books here Further, while in general I think the author is a good guy making an important work, I can t stop feeling than this book trims some corners a bit Don t get me wrong, I don t mean the author tells lies in purpose or something, but I m sure that as it happens in most memoirs etc, often he focuses on the positive side of things and doesn t mention what went wrong on some projects or various small mischiefs that surely must have happen during his trips And I m not talking about an upset stomach or specific people on a specific location slamming their doors to him, but on how it s possible overcoming bureaucracy in countries run by corrupted governments without never ever giving a bribe, or meeting a local mafia guy due to a misunderstanding while talking to the hotel receptionist, or how it happens having people drive you in the middle of nowhere for no apparent reason and without apparent consequences and so on Not very convincing Then of course, it s easy to judge by one sofa while others trek the world trying to improve people s lives I m glad I read this book, although I don t think it s something that calls for a re read , Dean s Beans ,Dean Cycon, , Fair Trade, ,, , , Fair Trade, , , , , , ,Javatrekker Dispatches from the World of Fair Trade Coffee ,, ,, , , , , ,, ,

  5. says:

    If you care what s in your cup, read this book

  6. says:

    This is a good book for anyone interested in fair trade coffee Its a good first hand write up of the travels and daily life of Dean as he treks around the coffee regions of the world It seems to get a little long winded to me at times but then I can imagine all the traveling itself was sometimes a chore, especially all the long drives and hikes to remote locations I now have a better picture of the culture these beans are coming from when I purchase a package with geographical origin on them This is a good book for anyone interested in fair trade coffee Its a good first hand write up of the travels and daily life of Dean as he treks around the coffee regions of the world It seems to get a little long winded to me at times but then I can imagine all the traveling itself was sometimes a chore, especially all the long drives and hikes to remote locations I now have a better picture of the culture these beans are coming from when I purchase a package with geographical origin on them If you drink coffee you should read this

  7. says:

    Unfortunately the theme was relatively uncommon throughout I certainly learned a lot about fair trade coffee and the places that produce this kind of coffee I wish the book were a littleorganized, directed, and gave an overview of fair trade among other things I always felt like I was starting a paragraph in the middle of a conversation with this guy.

  8. says:

    Loved this book It is really eye opening and informational about the coffee industry around the world.

  9. says:

    Dean tells fascinating stories from around the world A pleasure to read

  10. says:

    An eye opener This book was informative, but a slow read Some chapters were fascinating and grabbed me from the start, some were overly political and lost me completely I ve been picking this up and putting it down again for several months so it s quite a relief to reach the end On the other hand, I have full respect for the work of Dean Cycon, founder of Dean s Beans He has travelled to the source of his supplies and treats his farmers with compassion and dignity.The chapters each refer to An eye opener This book was informative, but a slow read Some chapters were fascinating and grabbed me from the start, some were overly political and lost me completely I ve been picking this up and putting it down again for several months so it s quite a relief to reach the end On the other hand, I have full respect for the work of Dean Cycon, founder of Dean s Beans He has travelled to the source of his supplies and treats his farmers with compassion and dignity.The chapters each refer to one visit, one area of the world, dating between 1997 and 2007 I had no idea there were so many coffee producing areas Dean s main message to the farmers is to work together to cut out the money grabbing middle man and, via co operatives, to produce Free Trade coffee of uniform quality To this end he supports them by providing fairly inexpensive equipment that facilitates the process of hulling the beans and returns a percentage of the profits directly to the farmers for improvements within the area This may be schooling, social improvements, wells etc.Some parts are quite distressing, such as the Death Train, which refers to a freight train that runs from the border of Guatemala and Mexico, right up to the US border It is swarming with desperate people who are unable to feed their families due to the poor prices they earn for their coffee These people travel in all weathers, squeezed betwen carriages or sitting on cargo Meanwhile others use violence and extortion to steal what little these poor people may be carrying And there s no guarentee of work when they arrive Many fall from the train and are injured on the line, losing limbs or even their lives.Fortunately other chapters are upbeat, such as Dean s visit to Papua New Guinea These people are self sufficient in food production and coffee is just a part of their produce They greeted Dean with song and dance, many of them plastered with mud of various colours.I certainly learned a lot and am now better informed about the source of the coffee I drink.3 stars for the book itself but 5 stars for the great work that Dean Cycon is doing around the world

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