A Time of Changes



[EPUB] ✵ A Time of Changes By Robert Silverberg – E17streets4all.co.uk In the far future, Earth is a worn out backwater and humanity is spread across the galaxy on worlds that began as colonies, but now feel like home, each with its own long history of a thousand years o In the far future, Earth is a worn out backwater and humanity is spread across the galaxy on worlds that began as colonies, but now feel like home, each with its own long history of a thousand years or , and each with its own unique culture One of the strangest is on Borthan, where the founding settlers established the Covenant, which teaches that the self is to be despised, and forbids anyone to reveal his innermost thoughts or feelings to A Time PDF or another On Borthan, the filthiest obscenities imaginable are the words I and me For the heinous crime of self baring, apostates have always paid with exile or death, but after his eyes are opened by a visitor from Earth, Kinnall Darival, prince of Salla, risks everything to teach his people the real meaning of being human.A Time of Changes

There are many authors in the database with this nameRobert Silverberg is one of science fiction s most beloved writers, and the author of such contemporary classics as Dying Inside, Downward to the Earth and Lord Valentine s Castle, as well as At Winter s End, also available in a Bison Books edition He is a past president of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America and the winner of five Nebula Awards and five Hugo Awards In the A Time PDF or Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America presented him with the Grand Master Award Silverberg is one of twenty nine writers to have received that distinction.

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    If you re looking for a CBR and CBZ reader of self baring, apostates have always paid with exile or death, but after his eyes are opened by a visitor from Earth, Kinnall Darival, prince of Salla, risks everything to teach his people the real meaning of being human."/>
  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 205 pages
  • A Time of Changes
  • Robert Silverberg
  • English
  • 09 June 2018
  • 0586039953

10 thoughts on “A Time of Changes

  1. says:

    A Time for Changes by Robert Silverberg is difficult to rate and evendifficult to review I can begin by saying that I liked it Silverberg tells a good story, he s a fine writer and his narration draws the reader in Set in the distant future, on a planet inhabited by humans for thousands of years, but still with the knowledge of far off earth as an anachronistic home, we follow the life of Kenal, second son of a king in a strictly primogeniture hierarchy The world is also strictly in th A Time for Changes by Robert Silverberg is difficult to rate and evendifficult to review I can begin by saying that I liked it Silverberg tells a good story, he s a fine writer and his narration draws the reader in Set in the distant future, on a planet inhabited by humans for thousands of years, but still with the knowledge of far off earth as an anachronistic home, we follow the life of Kenal, second son of a king in a strictly primogeniture hierarchy The world is also strictly in the grips of a theocratic culture called the Covenant where it is profane, vulgar and even blasphemous to use I , me , or myself and these words are synonymous with the vilified concepts of self bearing Here is where Silverberg gets you, the psychological, sociological setting where people are so ingrained in the idea that they cannot express individuality that the words, I love you are criminal Kenal discovers a drug a lot like cocaine or ecstasy , scratched from a feral jungle people in the southern continent hmmmm that he becomes addicted to and which ruins his life among this society Published in 1972, and winner of the Nebula Award that year, Silverberg creates a tension where the common ideas of sharing and love have been turned upside down and our protagonist struggles with whether he is a drug fiend or a revolutionary cultural messiah

  2. says:

    This is a surprisingly different read At the very first, I thought it was going to be an alien Odyssey, a SF treatment of the greek legend, with just a hint of something truly interesting, culturally, in that the entire race, or nearly the entire race, is devoted to self abnegation.Imagine, then, instead of relying on the world building adventure that it began with, it turned into a very distinctive novel of the drug culture that reflects 1971 perfectly, changing Ulysses into Timothy Leary, and This is a surprisingly different read At the very first, I thought it was going to be an alien Odyssey, a SF treatment of the greek legend, with just a hint of something truly interesting, culturally, in that the entire race, or nearly the entire race, is devoted to self abnegation.Imagine, then, instead of relying on the world building adventure that it began with, it turned into a very distinctive novel of the drug culture that reflects 1971 perfectly, changing Ulysses into Timothy Leary, and instead of being a Lotus Eater, he s become an LSD like proponent of a drug that allows limited telepathy.And then the cultural cool bit now comes to the fore as the full and major plot point, because it is considered evil to say I , and it s evenevil to say I love you How much worse is it when you can see right into the heart and mind of someone else who takes the drug with you Is it a mystical entwining, an exploration of love and understanding Or is it, as everyone else seems to think, a twisted aberration, an illegal and immoral pastime, or the destruction of everything good and right in the world The tale of the gods does hold a moral, after all.Honestly, I ve read a lot of great drug culture books, fiction and non fiction, but this reads as one of the very best, exploring the highlights and the problems within our own culture and especially of the 60 s and 70 s Not only is it a fascinatingly good story in its own right, but it reflects our world in equal measure, serving a dual duty nearly effortlessly.Just a warning, though, for you readers who might get turned off by free sex and shameless, almost laughable pornography The novel has it Just remember the times It s all about throwing off the shackles of the accepted norm, after all, whether it s conformity, sexual repression, or opening your mind to new experiences If you keep that in mind, I m sure you ll get a kick out of this novel in the spirit it is offered.Oh, and by the way, it was nominated for 72 Hugo and won the 71 Nebula Interesting, no

  3. says:

    Robert Silverberg is a legend, one of the all time greats, and among these all time greats he is probably the most underrated He has Hugo and Nebula Awards up the wazoo but is relatively unknown compared to the giants of the genre like Asimov, Clarke, and Heinlein, IMHO he belongs up there with them in term of accolades A Time of Changes is one of his best novels if his Goodreads page is anything to go by However, if you have never read anything by Silverberg before you may want to start with Robert Silverberg is a legend, one of the all time greats, and among these all time greats he is probably the most underrated He has Hugo and Nebula Awards up the wazoo but is relatively unknown compared to the giants of the genre like Asimov, Clarke, and Heinlein, IMHO he belongs up there with them in term of accolades A Time of Changes is one of his best novels if his Goodreads page is anything to go by However, if you have never read anything by Silverberg before you may want to start with somethingimmediately accessible like Lord Valentine s Castle or Dying Inside That said A Time of Changes is indeed an extremely good and unusual book If you are in the mood for a thought provoking but not action packed book by all means dive straight into this one.The novel gets off to a slow start and never really shifts into high gear However, once you immerse into the story, characters and settings the fascination sets in, and the slow pace becomes a kind of virtuethis planet was settled by men who had strong religious beliefs, who specifically came here to preserve them, and who took great pains to instill them in their descendantsIn a nutshell, the story is set on a human colony planet called Velada Borthan where intimacy is taboo and self denial is the norm Their society operates under a Covenant that prohibits opening up one s feelings except to a designated bondbrother and bondsister The usage of first person pronouns I and me is considered obscene The title of the book refers to the protagonist Kinnall Darival s discovery of a drug that forms a temporary telepathic link between the drinkers After his first experience with the drug, it becomes clear that the Covenant is preventing people from intimacy, and thereby from understanding and loving each other It is actually fairly difficult to synopsize this book briefly and interestingly but it really is a wonderful thought experiment that explores human relationship, religiosity, and empathy A culture where people build walls around themselves to keep everybody at a distance and human interactions are always impersonal have far reaching implications In some way, it is an allegory for impersonal, taciturn human relationships we often encounter in real life.I hesitate to call A Time of Changes a difficult book as the narrative style is straightforward, and even the timeline is almost completely linear except for the frame story at the beginning and the end with only one plot stand and point of view The possible difficulty lies in the unusual theme and slow, contemplative pacing As usual, Robert Silverberg writes beautiful literary prose without lapsing into excessively lyrical passages There is even some mild humour in the polite circumlocution dialogue which is the norm for this planet For exampleI should not have said, One would have a room, but rather, Is there a room to be had At a restaurant, it is wrong to say, One will dine on thus and thus, but rather, These are the dishes that have been chosen And so on and so on, twisting everything into a cumbersome passive form to avoid the sin of acknowledging one s own existenceIn writing this review I find that while I love the book I can not sell it very well because it is not a fun read as such, unless you enjoy pondering thought experiments If you read this book and dismiss it as boring you may want to pause to examine what you want from a novel If it is purely entertainment then this may not be the book for you If you enjoy imagining how our society may operating under very different sets of rules A Time of Changes is endlessly fascinating The Nebula Award 1971 for Best Novel is well deserved

  4. says:

    This is one of Silverberg s best novels from his most prolific and creative period in the late 1960s early 1970s, along with Downward to the Earth and Dying Inside It s about a repressive human society on a distant planet called Borthan, in which the terms I and myself are obscenities, and self bearing is a serious crime It s the story of Kinnall Darival, the second son of a Plutarch essentially a prince , who must leave his home to avoid being a threat to his older brother s claim to r This is one of Silverberg s best novels from his most prolific and creative period in the late 1960s early 1970s, along with Downward to the Earth and Dying Inside It s about a repressive human society on a distant planet called Borthan, in which the terms I and myself are obscenities, and self bearing is a serious crime It s the story of Kinnall Darival, the second son of a Plutarch essentially a prince , who must leave his home to avoid being a threat to his older brother s claim to rulership When he encounters an Earthman trader named Schweiz, he forms an intimate bond that would be unacceptable with others of his kind, and when the Earthman introduces him to a mind altering drug that allows a direct and complete telepathic sharing of the souls of both users, this breaks down the rigid bonds inside him and catalyzes him to form a new movement perhaps religion isaccurate to open up others to their own feelings, since they must learn to love themselves in order to love others The idea of using drugs to break down the artificial barriers of society and the mind is a vintage 1960s 1970s theme.In surprising ways, this book resembled Evgeny Zamyatin s We 1924 and Ayn Rand s Anthem 1938 since it depicted a repressive society that demonizes the individual, venerates the group, and suppresses private feelings In both books, the concept of I is forbidden, and people have numbers in place of names However, those early dystopian classics were written by Russian emigrates who had escaped oppressive totalitarian regimes, and forcibly showed the dangers of suppressing free will and individualism What is most interesting is that Anthem came to a radically different conclusion from A Time of Changes Instead of exhorting readers to love themselves and others and break down barriers, Ayn Rand pushes her famous philosophy of objectivity, which emphasizes self interest, reason, and individual freedom Despite the outward similarities of concept, the messages couldn t be anydifferent.I was also strongly reminded of Ursula K LeGuin s The Left Hand of Darkness Both novels are set on distant planets settled by humanity but relatively isolated and somewhat undeveloped technologically In LeGuin s Gethen, the population consists of hermaphrodites that assume male and female aspects only when in heat kemmer When a human envoy named Genly Ai arrives, he goes through great difficulties understanding their cultures and recognizing his own shortcomings and gender biases The plot has a lot of similarities as Genly s companion Estraven is a powerful bureaucrat that is forced into exile and must hide in various guises as he travels to various kingdoms This is similar to Kinnall Darival s story, the second son of a septarch who must go into exile and disguise himself for political reasons at first, and later because he tries to spread the seditious new religion of self discovery Both books are journeys of self discovery featuring spiritual awakenings and are highly recommended

  5. says:

    Puritans to the stars Something like that As usual, Silverberg delves into a complex issue with realistic characters manages to keep them distant enough that I never manage to care about them This has an interesting premise, a belief system of self containment that our main character eventually fights There are elements from many great classics, Heart of Darkness, The Scarlet Letter, others I could appreciate the complex theme, the world building, tragedy, but it never sucked me in H Puritans to the stars Something like that As usual, Silverberg delves into a complex issue with realistic characters manages to keep them distant enough that I never manage to care about them This has an interesting premise, a belief system of self containment that our main character eventually fights There are elements from many great classics, Heart of Darkness, The Scarlet Letter, others I could appreciate the complex theme, the world building, tragedy, but it never sucked me in He s a great editor a technically accomplished author, but I rarely connect with his characters That made his books a slog when I was younger I thought I d give him another chance Still the same for me, though My library has a few other books by him, but I doubt I ll bother any time soon Like Frank Herbert s books, our interests rarely overlap

  6. says:

    4.0 to 4.5 stars Another intelligent and provocative story by Robert Silverberg who seems to have a real gift for evocative stories This strong, emotional tale involves the journey of a repressed member of a repressed society to open himself up and find his self The novel is set on a distant planet originally colonized from an Earth over populated and polluted The planet s population lives by the Covenant whose most notable characteristic is the complete and utter denial of self Words 4.0 to 4.5 stars Another intelligent and provocative story by Robert Silverberg who seems to have a real gift for evocative stories This strong, emotional tale involves the journey of a repressed member of a repressed society to open himself up and find his self The novel is set on a distant planet originally colonized from an Earth over populated and polluted The planet s population lives by the Covenant whose most notable characteristic is the complete and utter denial of self Words like I and me are obscenities and their use is a crime known as self bearing The central character is Kinnall Darival, a noble who has always found himself troubled by the ways of his people Kinnall, through the use of a new drug finds that he is able to link telepathically with others and share their thoughts and feelings This sharing leads Kinnall to revolt against the oppressive culture The novel is presented in the style of an autobiography, written by Kinnall while he awaits impending capture and imprisonment for his cultural crimes I found this to be a very well written and powerful story by one of the masters of psychological science fiction HIGHLY RECOMMENDED Winner Nebula Award Best Novel 1972 Nominee Hugo Award Best Novel 1972 Nominee Locus Award Best SF Novel 1972

  7. says:

    This 1971 novel won the Nebula Award and was nominated for the Hugo, but I have to confess I found it to be quite underwhelming.Robert Silverberg offers a first person memoir of a future human descended from Earthlings on a far distant planet In his society words like I and me are considered obscenities Burdening others with one s individuality, sharing one s self with them, is held to be a sin that should be limited whenever possible When he meets a man from Earth with a rare and illeg This 1971 novel won the Nebula Award and was nominated for the Hugo, but I have to confess I found it to be quite underwhelming.Robert Silverberg offers a first person memoir of a future human descended from Earthlings on a far distant planet In his society words like I and me are considered obscenities Burdening others with one s individuality, sharing one s self with them, is held to be a sin that should be limited whenever possible When he meets a man from Earth with a rare and illegal drug that allows individuals to fuse their consciousnesses, the protagonist questions and ultimately rebels against his culture s taboos, and he pays the price for his heresy.The novel has problems First, the world building seems poorly thought out If individuality and personal pride and sharing are evil if people must deflect attention from self by saying one instead of I or me why do they have personal names and take pleasure in having namesakes, for instance Over and over again, when inconsistencies reared their heads, it occurred to me that Yevgeny Zamyatin We and George Orwell 1984 offered farsophisticated explorations of how institutions may try to control language and how language in turn affects identity and self perception, and they did it half a century before Silverberg wrote this.Second, for the main character s time of changes to have the proper impact, the reader should empathize with him in some way and appreciate the depth and drama of his awakening and transformation Instead, he s about as unsympathetic as they come flat, uninspiring, oddly two dimensional, and at times genuinely annoying I recognize there was a literary reason for his rambling discussions of his impressive genital size and premature ejaculation issues, but I won t miss them, that s for certain Third, the novel comes across as dated in a way that novels a century older ordo not because of Silverberg s handling of the consciousness expanding drug It bears all the hallmarks of a late sixties early seventies flirtation with the counterculture from a safe distance Karin Boye s depiction of a sharing drug in 1940 s Kallocain is farnuanced for that matter, Robert Heinlein s exploration of the counterculture in Stranger in a Strange Land published ten years before A Time of Changes is farchallenging.In short, if I can be forgiven for collapsing my review into LOLcat speech, I see what Silverberg s doing there, but he s doing it wrong Or, to beprecise, everything this novel attempts has been done better elsewhere by others

  8. says:

    When settlers first colonized Borthan, they set up a society and a religion called The Covenant that makes self bearing into a taboo People cannot share their deepest thoughts with others, with the sole exception being one s bond brother and bond sister One can never say the words I or me , because that indicates a sort of self infatuation, or self bearing Those words are the most terribly obscene words one can possibly utter This science fiction novel is written as an autobiogr When settlers first colonized Borthan, they set up a society and a religion called The Covenant that makes self bearing into a taboo People cannot share their deepest thoughts with others, with the sole exception being one s bond brother and bond sister One can never say the words I or me , because that indicates a sort of self infatuation, or self bearing Those words are the most terribly obscene words one can possibly utter This science fiction novel is written as an autobiography The story is set in the far future, on the world of Borthan Kinall Darival is a prince who feels threatened by his older brother So he runs from his homeland, in order that his brother might not think him a threat to his throne view spoiler While in his self exile, Kinall meets a man from Earth, who tempts him with a consciousness raising drug Neither of them knows exactly what the drug will do as it turns out, it allows all those taking the drug to snoop around in the minds of the others present It tends to raise one s consciousness and is also a mode of self discovery Kinall resolves to bring this drug to the masses, to allow everyone to share their minds with each other This will allow people to break out of this taboo hide spoiler This book was first published in 1971, when hallucinogenic drugs were becoming mainstream and self discovery and cultural freedom were the rage The book is well written, but it is written in a dry style that is not particularly engaging It is written as an autobiography, in a voice that is almost devoid of emotion It is not an adventure story,of a story of self discovery There are some great opportunities for exploring the conflicting philosophies, but those opportunities are not taken

  9. says:

    This book is far, far too preoccupied with its leading man s premature ejaculation.The repetitive fact that he puts his penis in many willing receptacle women but never sticks it in the one woman he truly lusts after really distracted me from the story where he learns to bare his soul or be human Guys, he gets high on a drug and it changes his life.The End.In case you re wondering, view spoiler Kinnall does finally learn to control his ejaculations during sex, for a bit o This book is far, far too preoccupied with its leading man s premature ejaculation.The repetitive fact that he puts his penis in many willing receptacle women but never sticks it in the one woman he truly lusts after really distracted me from the story where he learns to bare his soul or be human Guys, he gets high on a drug and it changes his life.The End.In case you re wondering, view spoiler Kinnall does finally learn to control his ejaculations during sex, for a bit of orgasmic love with a prostitute, once he experiences mind mingling with other human beings I know we were all dying for that bit of closure hide spoiler

  10. says:

    A Time of Changes won the Nebula Award for best novel of 1971 I never numbered it as among my favorite Silverberg titles, and after having listened to the audiobook version I haven t changed my opinion It s a very well written book, nicely paced and plotted, swinging back and forth in time to heighten tension and underline events and emphasize points Silverberg was at his best in portraying complex characters here It s very much a novel of the 1960 s, being the story of finding and being you A Time of Changes won the Nebula Award for best novel of 1971 I never numbered it as among my favorite Silverberg titles, and after having listened to the audiobook version I haven t changed my opinion It s a very well written book, nicely paced and plotted, swinging back and forth in time to heighten tension and underline events and emphasize points Silverberg was at his best in portraying complex characters here It s very much a novel of the 1960 s, being the story of finding and being yourself with lengthy examinations of sex and drugs and philosophy I can t help but wonder if it mightn t have been written in some small part as a response to the most famous novel by science fiction s other famous Robert Heinlein s Stranger in a Strange Land There s no real speculative element other than drug induced telepathy one character is identified as an Earthman and it s stated that the planet is but one of many inhabited by humans, but I believe the real setting of the novel is California and what a long, strange trip it is A Time of Changes is great literature, but not necessarily great science fiction I never understood the original cover that seems to portray a bird growing out of an aboriginal head still don t

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