Shamans: Siberian Spirituality and the Western Imagination



[Read] ➺ Shamans: Siberian Spirituality and the Western Imagination ➶ Ronald Hutton – E17streets4all.co.uk With their ability to enter trances, to change into the bodies of other creatures and to fly through the northern skies, shamans are the subject of both popular and scholarly fascination In Shamans Ro With their ability to Spirituality and eBook ✓ enter trances, to change into the bodies of other creatures and to fly through the northern skies, shamans are the subject of both popular and scholarly fascination In Shamans Ronald Hutton looks at what is really known about both the Shamans of Siberia and about others spread throughout the world He traces Shamans: Siberian PDF or the growth of knowledge of shamans in Imperial and Stalinist Russia, describes local variations and different types of shamanism and explores recent western influences on its history and modern practice This is a challenging book by one of the world s leading authorities on Paganism.Shamans: Siberian Spirituality and the Western Imagination

Ronald Hutton born Spirituality and eBook ✓ is an English historian who specializes in the study of Early Modern Britain, British folklore, pre Christian religion and contemporary Paganism A professor of history at the University of Bristol, Hutton has published fourteen books and has appeared on British television and radio.

Shamans: Siberian Spirituality and the Western Imagination
  • Hardcover
  • 224 pages
  • Shamans: Siberian Spirituality and the Western Imagination
  • Ronald Hutton
  • English
  • 10 June 2019
  • 1852853247

10 thoughts on “Shamans: Siberian Spirituality and the Western Imagination

  1. says:

    This book came highly recommended to me, as I was looking for something that would get at the history of the word shaman and how it was used in Siberian Shamanism I found it to be a well researched and well written book about precisely what is known about the shamanic experience in Siberia Hutton certainly dug out all of the relevant sources and put them into a cogent and easily read narrative It is well documented with extensive notes and sources In the last three chapters of the book, Hu This book came highly recommended to me, as I was looking for something that would get at the history of the word shaman and how it was used in Siberian Shamanism I found it to be a well researched and well written book about precisely what is known about the shamanic experience in Siberia Hutton certainly dug out all of the relevant sources and put them into a cogent and easily read narrative It is well documented with extensive notes and sources In the last three chapters of the book, Hutton overlays what I will characterize as his perspective on famous writers in the field of contemporary shamanism, most prominently, Mircea Eliade and Michael Harner, although he certainly covers a great manyHe wishes to see what use has been made of the Siberian tradition by historians and anthropologists, and in this he is both critical and skeptical He sees much that is speculative in the writing, and sees no real consensus Much of his criticism seems to be aimed directly at the contemporary notions of what shamanism was and how it is put to use in contemporary society He does acknowledge evidence of Finnish shamanism, and proceeds to debunk much of the rest of it, including notions of druid shamanic traditions and even that of the Norse other than the Saami Finland He then proceeds on to investigate what he terms neoshamanism or urban shamanism , which he describes as .an application to modern needs of techniques derived to some extent from traditional peoples, of the sort which scholars have dubbed shamanic He highlights 4 components of this, starting with the connection to the writings of Michael Harner and Carlos Castaneda My sense is that he is somehow critical of the fact that both left a strict academic environment in order to carry teachings to the lay population It seems to me that he finds that the complexity of the indigenous methodology has been distilled dumbed down for the contemporary western market He next focuses on Eliade s vision of shamanism as a world wide and ancient phenomena, an assertion which he believes is by no means proven, though he does not cite extensive sources for his perspective He discusses two other points which he deems relevant At the end of the day, while the first part of the book is well researched, I remain in the dark as to what Hutton s points and assertions are regard the contemporary applications

  2. says:

    This book is highly informative, critical and important to read if one wants to find out what we really do and do not know about a practice first encountered by Europeans in Siberia and Mongolia and termed shamanism by western scholars, the problems regarding the definition of this term, where Mircea Eliade was wrong, the influence of neoshamanism and

  3. says:

    If you read only one book on Siberian religion, this should be it It does an excellent job of historicizing what Eliade and others have sought to make timeless and primitive In laying out the historic context of shamans, and the Russian and other European expeditions that encountered them, Hutton also offers a decent introduction to Siberian history at large.

  4. says:

    Although I had to read this book for class, it honestly wasn t bad It gave a lot of insights and I liked how he gave a lot of definitions This book was good BUT it seemed to flip flop around My mind felt like it went through the wringer Not to mention it got very dense as you went on.

  5. says:

    The great thing about Hutton is his books are essentially a survey of the available secondary materials on a subject, with his brief analysis of their usefulness SO handy Great as always.

  6. says:

    reminds self authors don t choose cover work authors don t choose cover work.

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