Where the Devil Can't Go



[Read] ➱ Where the Devil Can't Go ➹ Anya Lipska – E17streets4all.co.uk The naked body of a girl washes up on London s Thames foreshore the only clue to her identity a heart shaped tattoo Who is she And why did she die Janusz Kiszka, unofficial fixer to East London s Poli The naked body of a Devil Can't PDF/EPUB å girl washes up on London s Thames foreshore the only clue to her identity a heart shaped tattoo Where the PDF/EPUB or Who is she And why did she die Janusz Kiszka, unofficial fixer to East London s Polish community, and a man with his own the Devil Can't PDF/EPUB ¾ distinctive moral code, has been hired to track down a missing waitress Meanwhile, DC Natalie Kershaw, a rookie detective who s not afraid of breaking a few rules, investigates the suspicious deaths of two Polish girlsThey hail from very different worlds, but Kiszka and Kershaw are set on collision course When Kershaw accuses Kiszka of murder, he escapes to Poland, determined to find the real killer There he discovers a terrible secret from the country s troubled communist past revealing why the girls were murderedBut is he too late to save the life of a third.Where the Devil Can't Go

Anya s debut Where the Devil Can't PDF/EPUB å Devil Can t Go led to her being selected for Val McDermid s prestigious New Blood Panel at Where the PDF/EPUB or the Theakstons Crime Writing Festival in Harrogate Anya went on to write a trilogy following the investigations of Polish fixer Kiszka and Met detective the Devil Can't PDF/EPUB ¾ Kershaw Body Language is her brand new crime novel out October featuring Cassie Raven, a Goth girl mortuary technician who talks to the dead The series will be published by Bonnier Zaffre in the UK and by publishers in Germany, France, Ukraine, and RussiaIn her day job as a producer of factual TV documentaries, Anya has worked on a dizzying range of topics from a missing Leonardo da Vinci masterpiece,to the sex lives of Neanderthals, how to clone a mammoth, and a history of Italian gardens with Monty Don.

Where the Devil Can't Go PDF/EPUB Ä the Devil Can't
    Where the Devil Can't Go PDF/EPUB Ä the Devil Can't breaking a few rules, investigates the suspicious deaths of two Polish girlsThey hail from very different worlds, but Kiszka and Kershaw are set on collision course When Kershaw accuses Kiszka of murder, he escapes to Poland, determined to find the real killer There he discovers a terrible secret from the country s troubled communist past revealing why the girls were murderedBut is he too late to save the life of a third."/>
  • Paperback
  • 424 pages
  • Where the Devil Can't Go
  • Anya Lipska
  • English
  • 04 November 2018
  • 0007504586

10 thoughts on “Where the Devil Can't Go

  1. says:

    If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.I started reading this novel because of the title Really I m familiar with the quote by the German poet Ludwig Tieck The quote in German goes something like this Wo der Teufel nicht selbst hin will, schickt er ein Weib , which means Where the Devil Can t Go, he ll send a woman Kershaw in this particular case After reading the novel, I came to conclude that there s also a polish version of the same proverb Despite the numer If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.I started reading this novel because of the title Really I m familiar with the quote by the German poet Ludwig Tieck The quote in German goes something like this Wo der Teufel nicht selbst hin will, schickt er ein Weib , which means Where the Devil Can t Go, he ll send a woman Kershaw in this particular case After reading the novel, I came to conclude that there s also a polish version of the same proverb Despite the numerous tales and proverbs celebrating the wiseness of old people and promoting their well being, the unwritten lore stories and proverbs and riddles and songs of a culture is replete with reflections of a basic distrustfulness of age.You can read the rest of this review elsewhere

  2. says:

    With her first novel, Anya Lipska has created that lovely thing a crime novel with enough originality to make it a great read for fans of the genre Janusz Kiszka is a Polish ex pat who has been living in London for many years A fixer he is asked to track down a missing Polish girl Meanwhile, the body of a young girl is washed up along the Thames and new officer DC Natalie Kershaw is investigating I loved the background to this novel giving an insight into a different culture within the With her first novel, Anya Lipska has created that lovely thing a crime novel with enough originality to make it a great read for fans of the genre Janusz Kiszka is a Polish ex pat who has been living in London for many years A fixer he is asked to track down a missing Polish girl Meanwhile, the body of a young girl is washed up along the Thames and new officer DC Natalie Kershaw is investigating I loved the background to this novel giving an insight into a different culture within the UK, and some history about their roots, this is as much a political novel as anything else and I found it fascinating reading The characters are terrific well fleshed out and compelling, I was especially fond of Janusz once hoping to enter the scientific community until fate intervened to give him an entirely different existence he is a man of many sides, not all of them good Natalie is very likeable, the interactions between the two are terrific and I hope that their relationship can be further developed in future stories The mystery component of the book is well done, enough twists and turns to make you keep page turning, but the characterisation was the part I was most fond of I love a book where you can really get behind the protagonists and live the story right along with them and this had that in spades The resolution was satisfying and I will certainly be readingfrom this author

  3. says:

    A middle aged Polish fixer and unofficial Private Detective, and a young ambitious female Detective Sergeant find themselves working the same case from different angles in modern day LondonConsidering this a first novel, this book is an astonishing achievement both in terms of plot and characterisation, and it feels like this is the work of a muchmature author Both the two main characters feel utterly real, well rounded and totally believable The story progresses from their points o A middle aged Polish fixer and unofficial Private Detective, and a young ambitious female Detective Sergeant find themselves working the same case from different angles in modern day LondonConsidering this a first novel, this book is an astonishing achievement both in terms of plot and characterisation, and it feels like this is the work of a muchmature author Both the two main characters feel utterly real, well rounded and totally believable The story progresses from their points of view in alternating chapters until they meet in a tense chapter about a third of the way through They thenor less go their own ways until the climatic end of the book The author drops us straight into the unfamiliar world of Polish immigrants in London without any use of dumbing down options such as translations or pronunciation lists This is a good thing, as we are forced to work it out for ourselves, but the clever way in which the author structures her sentences almost always means that we understand what she is saying anyway Equally, her depiction of the life of a British cop feels totally real without resorting to any over worn cliches.The plot just rattles along and never feels forced There s very little wastage or over padding here, and you never feel that you have read a 400 page book The plot does start to go off the rails a little bit towards the end, as the political element comesinto play, and the epilogue was a little underdeveloped given the importance of what happens in it, but these are relatively minor quibbles I came very close to giving this 5 stars, and that s not something I do very often these days This is an author to watch and I would very much like to see the characters she has created here appear again

  4. says:

    Fantastyczny That would be my resounding verdict on this gripping debut by Anya Lipska, set both in the Polish community of East London with a interesting sojourn back to Poland itself This is one read that definitely rises above the simple classification of police procedural in Lipska s capable hands, and proves itself to be a multi layered and culturally interesting reading experience as well.I think what I liked most about the book was the unveiling of a culture and way of life that I had v Fantastyczny That would be my resounding verdict on this gripping debut by Anya Lipska, set both in the Polish community of East London with a interesting sojourn back to Poland itself This is one read that definitely rises above the simple classification of police procedural in Lipska s capable hands, and proves itself to be a multi layered and culturally interesting reading experience as well.I think what I liked most about the book was the unveiling of a culture and way of life that I had very little knowledge of Unafraid to confront the less savoury aspects of Polish society, but illustrating the parallel affection and respect for Polish culture, Lipska lays bare the traditions and mindset of an immigrant community where its inherent traditions are strongly adhered to, but not at the expense of adapting to life in its adopted city The book is peppered with references to the intrinsic qualities of Polish culture, politics and history and what I loved is that although its evident how much Lipska knows about Polish life she didn t fall into the writer s trap of crowbarring in too much factual detail, or give an air of showing off how much she knows, and personally I felt the balance between fact and fiction was perfectly weighted From the smattering of original Polish words, to food, to religion and so on, and a greater exploration of Poland s tempestuous political history, I found this insight into Polish life significantly enhanced my enjoyment of the book, when juxtaposed with the central murder mystery itself.Janusz Kiska is a powerfully constructed character, reflecting perfectly the duality of the immigrant experience being tied to the needs and demands of his community, but also acutely aware of the concessions that need to be made residing in a foreign city When tasked with investigating the disappearance of a young Polish waitress, Janusz proves himself to be a man of great honour with a terrier like determination to track her down In the course of his unofficial investigation, Janusz finds that painful memories of his pre London life are reawakened, and an ill fated trip back to Poland immerses him in a political conspiracy amongst the highest echelons of power Janusz is an extremely empathetic character despite his gruffness, and a man that you would absolutely want on your side in times of trouble I liked the way that Lipska used the character of the jocular and verbose Oskar as a foil to the natural solemnity of Janusz s demeanour Oskar is hilarious, foul mouthed and a total liability, lifting the whole mood of the book whenever he and Janusz cross paths and I enjoyed their robust verbal sparring which proved an indicator of the depth of the friendship Likewise, Janusz also comes to the attention of an eager young detective, Natalie Kershaw, investigating the death of a young girl Kershaw again is a well realised character, with a perfect balance of intuition and naivety, desperate to prove her credentials as a police officer, but at times subject to impulsive and dangerous actions that annoy her superiors At first she has an inherent distrust of the charming Janusz, with the development of their relationship over the course of the book being nicely handled, andimportantly has an air of credibility, reflecting the differing constraints of their roles as civilian police I liked the way that Kershaw is subject to the demands of proving herself as a female detective in an extremely male dominated workplace, and the occasional exposure of chinks in her armour exposing her tendency to doubt herself in matters of the personal.So absolutely no qualms from me about recommending this as a good read with a perfectly weighted balance between fact and fiction, raising the stakes of this debut police procedural You will not be disappointed

  5. says:

    The action is non stop and has incidents and heart stopping moments in both London and in Poland.This multi layered thriller has its soul within the Polish community in the UK conveying through echoes of Poland s recent history the reality of why Poles leave their homeland, the struggles they find in London and their hopes for the future The novel also has a political dimension which is cleverly woven into the plot.An engaging story that works on these various levels it is never the novel you The action is non stop and has incidents and heart stopping moments in both London and in Poland.This multi layered thriller has its soul within the Polish community in the UK conveying through echoes of Poland s recent history the reality of why Poles leave their homeland, the struggles they find in London and their hopes for the future The novel also has a political dimension which is cleverly woven into the plot.An engaging story that works on these various levels it is never the novel you thought you were reading as it comes to grips with different points of view It has the capacity to make you worry, become breathless and shock the reader with the pace of action, involved storytelling and elements of political intrigue.The novel is overlaid with crime in a number of guises from senseless murder to less obvious acts through ambition, betrayal, corruption, greed in criminal classes and basic human frailties demonstrated in church and government office.The book introduces two central characters A Polish fixer, Janusz Kiszka and a DC Natalie Kershaw just at the start of her CID career their paths cross at various times during the story and in each revelation of their own work a final showdown is inevitable He is searching for a missing Polish girl she is investigating a suspicious death after a young woman is dragged from the Thames She looks to him for advice and inside knowledge he could be a suspect but clearly isn t fully truthful holding something back Her frustration at his lack of co operation is made worse by her boss wanting to close the case as a suicide when she feels darker forces are at work She shareswith Kiszka to break the case but can and should she trust him.I love the menace for Kiszka when he feels he is being followed the sense of place is crucial in a number of scenes, neverso for him along the waterfront in Gdansk A place full of familiar streets and mixed memories now tinged with threat, a sense of foreboding and acute danger.This is a remarkable debut novel in this genre It is fresh and familiar at the same time Fresh in its angle, weaving a tale through the diasporic times of Polish immigration timely with the latest influx who perhaps struggle in different ways and challenge an older generation established here who perhaps culture aside feel they are British in many ways and England is their adoptive home Familiar in terms of the powerful writing style that reminds me of Frederick Forsyth at his best Qualities of writing, based on historical events and the consequences for people today caught up in the fallout from those times In the fictional outcomes imagined by such authors a danger remains where once it seemed obvious but now benign Ira Levin and Robert Harris also had this gift in some of their work To them add the name of Anya Lipska as someone who can bring goosebumps to one s reading pleasure

  6. says:

    I very much enjoyed this book This is a tautly gripping thriller mystery Young Polish girls are being murdered in London Janusz Kizska is the main protagonist, who for want of better words is a fixer for the Polish comunity He is asked by the local priest to find a missing Polish girl At the same time Detective Constable Natalie Kershaw is also looking into the murders of Polish girls there isn t much for either of them to go on.It is Janusz the main character who is the most compelling I very much enjoyed this book This is a tautly gripping thriller mystery Young Polish girls are being murdered in London Janusz Kizska is the main protagonist, who for want of better words is a fixer for the Polish comunity He is asked by the local priest to find a missing Polish girl At the same time Detective Constable Natalie Kershaw is also looking into the murders of Polish girls there isn t much for either of them to go on.It is Janusz the main character who is the most compelling A middle aged man battling his own demons and feelings of guilt In the course of his investigation he returns to Poland and is again drawn into themes from his past, Solidarity and Communism.Both Natalie and Janusz discover in the course of their parallel investigations that nothing is quite what it seems This novel was extremely well plotted and never faltered There were enough twists and turns that you were never sure how events would unfold

  7. says:

    Anya Lipska s Where the Devil Can t Gobegins on a building site in London, where an incompetent young Polish builder and decorator gets strong armed by the hero, Janusz Kiszka, for late payment of a sum of money he owes The first few chapters develop the backdrop of East London and the fast money, back of a lorry, gambits to be enjoyed in the erection of sub standard buildings for the Olympic Games.Janusz s troubled character slowly comes into focus A devout but doubting Catholic, a large man Anya Lipska s Where the Devil Can t Gobegins on a building site in London, where an incompetent young Polish builder and decorator gets strong armed by the hero, Janusz Kiszka, for late payment of a sum of money he owes The first few chapters develop the backdrop of East London and the fast money, back of a lorry, gambits to be enjoyed in the erection of sub standard buildings for the Olympic Games.Janusz s troubled character slowly comes into focus A devout but doubting Catholic, a large man whose face carries every trace of worry and wear it has picked up since his twenties, unsuccessful in love, he is fairly well off due to the increase in the value of his apartment He makes his day to day money from intimidation and other small time activities he would never have envisaged when he was a young science student in Poland.A mistake Janusz made in Poland, at the time of Solidarity, cut him off from a potential, respectable career as a scientist Now, he has become a sort of go to man in the Polish working class community in London, partnering often with a loveable but obnoxious loudmouth named Oskar Janusz navigates uneasily between the working class Polish community and his priest, who takes him to meetings and events in respectable institutions, such as the Catholic Church and the Polish Embassy, that still smack of the old, aristocratic Poland Janusz is asked to find a missing Polish girl in London At the same time, the second major character of the novel, Detective Constable Natalie Kershaw, begins to investigate the case of a dead body found in the Thames Then a second dead body appears, and Natalie discovers that they are both Polish In alternate chapters, the reader follows Janusz on a physical journey from London to Gdansk and its area and then back again, on his quest for Weronika, while Natalie seeks out evidence to find out how the two young women died At one point they cross each others pasts and if, at that moment, Janusz had dropped his guard and shared information Natalie s case would have been been quickly solved But Janusz s distrust of the police, based to some extent on his experience in Poland, and the mistake he made, prevents him from talking.On his physical journey to discover the truth, Janusz also engages in a historical journey which illustrates why the novel is titled, Where the Devil Can t Go , that gives the reader an interesting resume of the the Solidarity movement, the struggle to throw off Communism, the way in which informers were used by the Polish secret police to rat on their fellow citizens, and how all that is still influencing the behaviours of a few present day Polish politicians.Janusz is also very aware of the difference between the Polish generations, the old generation that is glad for the most part to have said goodbye to Communism, but that is still suffering from the wounds totalitarianism inflicted on the Polish psyche, and the younger generation, which works hard in England but whose main hedonic pursuits seem to be ego centric, superficial and dismissive of anything older people wish to tell them about the past On his physical and historical trip, at every step of which he is unknowingly spied upon and led where others want him to go, Janusz, who has worked in London forthan twenty years, comes to the realization that he no longer speaks the language of the place where he was born He has become one of those Poles who has been away too long He will never go back home.Janusz and Natalie both discover towards the end of the novel that all the initial assumptions they had made about their respective investigations were wrong Natalie finds out why the two young Polishwomen died In the process of discovering what has become of Weronika, Janusz unearths a sordid tale of collusion with communism and that, in his quest to find the young girl, he had been less of a hunter than the prey.The novel is well plotted, with many surprising twists, and it s very well written The book ends in a very satisfying display of fireworks, in which Janusz and Natalie finally come face to face with the bad guys But that s all I ll say about that I don t want to spoil the novel for everyone of you whom I encourage to read it.I bought the book because of its Polish theme and I was not disappointed Anya Lipska s description of the surprise Janusz felt when he goes back to his home town of Gdansk, which no longer resembles the colourless, joyless town he left behind, reminded me of the gap between the miserable cities of Warsaw or Toru I first saw in 1990 and the illuminated, sophisticated and trendy places they had turned into only 10 years later, after they d had a few years to reconnect with their sophisticated, pre Communist past Although most of the comments about the book I have seen so far tend to concentrate on Janusz Kiszka, I was just as delighted to read the chapters featuring Detective Constable Natalie Kershaw, a young Londoner, who is determined to show her wise, big hearted Sergeant, Streaky Bacon that she is a good detective, while resisting the barrack room humour of her male colleagues, as she tries to resist falling in love with a fellow cop I hope that Anya Lipska will be able to develop both Janusz and Natalie in future novels I will certainly be among the first to buy them

  8. says:

    Mrs Lipska has done her homework well I am impressed by her knowledge of the history and culture of my homeland I appreciate a mystery too, it was interesting and unpredictable.

  9. says:

    At the time of reviewing this Anya Lipska has a fully fledged series under her belt with the third Kiszka and Kershaw novel out in print, yet I had not realised that this book, her first, was originally a self published effort Focusing on the trials and tribulations of Janusz Kiszka, unofficial fixer for the Polish community in East London, and the young and ambitious Detective Constable Natalie Kershaw whose paths just have a way of crossing In essence, effectively a police procedural with At the time of reviewing this Anya Lipska has a fully fledged series under her belt with the third Kiszka and Kershaw novel out in print, yet I had not realised that this book, her first, was originally a self published effort Focusing on the trials and tribulations of Janusz Kiszka, unofficial fixer for the Polish community in East London, and the young and ambitious Detective Constable Natalie Kershaw whose paths just have a way of crossing In essence, effectively a police procedural with a touch of noir and a little added extra in the form of Kiszka A fantastic start to the novel brought to life the growing Polish migrant community in and around Stratford, many engaged in the construction of the London Olympics development Having been resident in the UK for over two decades, Janusz Kiszka seems to have found himself with the role of unofficial fixer for many of his fellow countrymen in the area He is fluent in the English language and with a connection to the local priest he seems to have been shoehorned into the role When Kiszka first arrived it was Father Pietruzki who kept an eye out for him and the elderly man knows Janusz has a good heart, even if he might not occasionally cross the line From his arrival as a builder in the 1980 s Kiskza has managed to purchase his own home in trendy Highbury and established a burgeoning friendship with married stripper Kasia His memories of the years under communism still haunt him and he cannot envisage returning to his homeland When the priest asks him to track down a young Polish waitress who has gone missing he agrees to take a look into the matter and he is nothing if not doggedly determined.Meanwhile the ambitious but naive DC Natalie Kershaw is trying to carve out a name for herself in her male dominated office She is sent to investigate the death of a young girl washed up on the banks of the Thames and the only clue as to her identity is a tattoo bearing two Polish names When the toxicology reports indicate the presence of drugs she refuses to give up and every bit as stubborn as Kiszka Pretty soon Kershaw jumps to several conclusions rather too quickly and mistakenly points the finger at Kiszka Natalie s naivety is cleverly portrayed and it never grates and it soon becomes evident that the fastest way to uncover the truth will involve cooperation between the pair and a begrudging acceptance of this is achieved as things proceed This mutually beneficial sharing of information seems to indicate the direction of the following books in the series and will certainly make for a few fireworks.Kiszka is a wonderfully well drawn character, he has so much depth and personality and I engaged muchwith the sections which focused on him as opposed to those which featured Kershaw Lipska brings Kiszka alive and in close friend Oskar she has created a real contrast who plays off Janusz well Oskar is highly amusing and lightens the proceedings on plenty of occasions In contrast although I warmed to DC Natalie Kershaw closer to the end of the novel she seemed a littleplastic and one dimensional I found it hard to connect with her character and it was the presence of DI Streaky Bacon who I wanted to hearfrom It felt that slightlywork has been done on the portrayal of Kiszka and that perhaps Kershaw wasof an afterthought I would hope in future that her character is brought to life a littleand padded out.The joy of this novel is Lipska s brilliant portrayal of the Polish community in and around East London with the frequent references to food, customs and practices I enjoyed this cross cultural slice of the action and so when the subject matter at the heart of the book turned out to be connected to the history of the Polish nation my interest waned I wanted to hear about how the cultural differences have influenced and impacted on the England of today If I had known the case would be so heavily connected to the martial law era I doubt I would have chosen to read My interest is in seeing how society changes as a community becomesdiverse and the future of Europe is of much greater interest to me than understanding the mistakes of the past With Kiszka taking a trip back home he is forced to recall all the memories of the old era that have left him with mixed emotions and I felt the lines of investigation blurred somewhat with his memories of the period under communism.A debut withthan enough promise to ensure I give the second book in the series a read but overall this was a slight disappointment for me, largely attributable to the highly politicised subject matter The premise for the follow up seemspurely crime based and with a littledepth to the character of Kershaw, this could be a real winner Perhaps the blistering start raised my expectations somewhat, but nothing can detract from the prowess of Anya Lipska s writing and her wry sense of humour In theory this sounded ideal for me and my overall rating would have been a four star if the subject matter had not been so heavily politicised I look forward to the second of the series as there was much to admire and I know have a working knowledge of Polish profanities

  10. says:

    Next to a great piece of literary fiction, there s nothing like a good thriller and Where the Devil Can t Go is certainly that Taut and unpredictable, it s a great read From what I understand, it s the first in a series featuring the two main protagonists Detective Constable Natalie Kerksaw and Janusz Kiszka, unofficial fixer to East London s Polish community Janusz is asked by his parish priest to find a missing girl, who like so many others Poles came to London s East Side to find work B Next to a great piece of literary fiction, there s nothing like a good thriller and Where the Devil Can t Go is certainly that Taut and unpredictable, it s a great read From what I understand, it s the first in a series featuring the two main protagonists Detective Constable Natalie Kerksaw and Janusz Kiszka, unofficial fixer to East London s Polish community Janusz is asked by his parish priest to find a missing girl, who like so many others Poles came to London s East Side to find work But it isn t as simple as that Janusz soon finds himself in the middle of something much larger than coaxing a runaway back to the protective arms of her London caretaker.We meet DC Kerksaw when she is called to investigate a floater found in the Thames River with an amateurish tattoo on her lower back and, soon after, another death, this time with evidence pointing directly at Janusz I pride myself on the fact I can usually figure out the ending of a book or movie fairly quickly But, whenever I thought I had this plot summed up, the author fooled me That s a good thing.Lipska is a master at characterization The story is told through the viewpoints of Kerksaw and Janusz and, with each alternating chapter, I could feel the shift in mood and tone the emotional resonance if I can borrow a phrase from another reviewer generated by the two individual characters The support characters are given the same attention to detail, and you can almost reach out and touch them Good stuff.As I ve said many times before, the best kind of fiction is one that teaches the reader some truths while weaving the fantasy Lipska manages to teach us a little about Polish history and gives us a glimpse of life in modern day Poland and also the Polish community in London I live in an area housing the largest population of Poles in the United States, and also having a few Polish in laws, so I can relate to much of it including the many references to the cuisine Janusz, for all his rough edges, is a bit of a culinary Lipska also manages to teach us a few Polish words and the proper pronunciation of the often difficult to pronounce surnames without it being the least bit tedious And, without getting too preachy, she reveals how many Poles felt living under Komunistow rule, yet she also speaks of the difficulties realized in the shift from socialism to capitalismHalf a million Poles managed to carve a living here, but born and bred Londoner Steve could never find work It was too easy to get by on benefit in this country, he reflected, not for the first time is awash with oil and gas profits and all that cash needs a home perhaps you ll come round to it when you see Poland s GDP go through the roof in five years time Is there any one perfect political economic structure This is my question, not Lipska s The political stuff aside, or because of it, Where the Devil Can t Go is a great thriller with non stop action, lots of OMG moments, and memorable characters ones I m eager to visit again Let me go on to say that if you are an American reader, the use of British slang might trip you up at times, but there weren t that many instances, and the terms really weren t hard to figure out I thought of it as a bonus it gave me a chance to learn some new lingo in case I ever visit the UK One thing I learned is nick can mean police station, prison, or to arrest Go figure Another thing, and I don t know if this is because I received a review copy, but, at times, a blank space between paragraphs could have been used to reflect a change in viewpoint when both Kershaw and Janusz were in the same scenes together Again, a very minor point, as I was quickly able to realize whose head I was in, but a blank space would have made itreadily apparent.Now, I m going to add something that might be considered a spoiler I don t really think so, but stop reading now if you haven t read the book yet I ll end this part of the review by saying I highly recommend it While I found the ending satisfying and believable, if the final consequences would have occurred a year later, instead of four weeks, I think I would have found itrealistic I really don t know why, other than I think it would have taken time to orchestrate It is a very subjective observation and a minor nit as the British would say to an overall great book, and one that didn t spoil my pleasure in reading it You can also find this review on Booksquawk.com

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