Fairy Tales and Stories



➛ Fairy Tales and Stories free download ➠ Author Hans Christian Andersen – E17streets4all.co.uk This book contains the complete Andersen s fairy tales and stories in audiobook and hardcopy formatHans Christian Andersen was a Danish author and poet Although a prolific writer of plays, travelogues This book contains the complete Andersen s Fairy Tales and Stories in audiobook and hardcopy formatHans Christian Andersen was a Danish author and poet Although a prolific writer of plays, travelogues, novels, and poems, Andersen is best remembered for his fairy tales, a literary genre he so mastered that he himself has become as mythical as the tales he wrote Andersen s popularity is not limited to children his stories called eventyrs, or fantastic tales express themes that transcend age and nationalityDuring his lifetime he was acclaimed for having delighted children worldwide and was feted by royalty Andersen Fairy Tales Epub / s fairy tales, which have been translated into thanlanguages, have become culturally embedded in the West s collective consciousness, readily accessible to children, but presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity for mature listeners readers as well They have inspired motion pictures, plays, ballets, and animated filmsNNING TIME hrs and minsPublic Domain PAL Studio.Fairy Tales and Stories

Hans Christian Andersen often referred to in Scandinavia as H C Andersen was a Danish author and poet Although a prolific writer of plays, travelogues, novels, and poems, Andersen is best remembered for his fairy tales Andersen s popularity is not limited to children his stories called eventyr, or fairy tales express themes that transcend age and nationalityAndersen s fairy tales, which have been translated intothan languages, have become culturally embedded in the West s collective consciousness, readily accessible to children, but presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity for mature readers as Fairy Tales Epub / well Some of his most famous fairy tales include The Little Mermaid , The Ugly Duckling , The Nightingale , The Emperor s New Clothes and manyHis stories have inspired plays, ballets, and both live action and animated films.

Fairy Tales and Stories eBook Ú Fairy Tales  Epub /
    If you re looking for a CBR and CBZ reader which have been translated into thanlanguages, have become culturally embedded in the West s collective consciousness, readily accessible to children, but presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity for mature listeners readers as well They have inspired motion pictures, plays, ballets, and animated filmsNNING TIME hrs and minsPublic Domain PAL Studio."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 408 pages
  • Fairy Tales and Stories
  • Hans Christian Andersen
  • English
  • 14 March 2018

10 thoughts on “Fairy Tales and Stories

  1. says:

    The Complete Fairy Tales The complete collection, Hans Christian AndersenHans Christian Andersen often referred to in Scandinavia as H C Andersen, 2 April 1805 4 August 1875 was a Danish author All the best loved fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen The Tinder Box Little Claus And Big Claus The Princess And The Pea Little Ida s Flowers Little Tiny Or Thumbelina The Saucy Boy The Travelling Companion The Little Mermaid The Emperor s New Suit The Goloshes Of Fortune The Daisy The Complete Fairy Tales The complete collection, Hans Christian AndersenHans Christian Andersen often referred to in Scandinavia as H C Andersen, 2 April 1805 4 August 1875 was a Danish author All the best loved fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen The Tinder Box Little Claus And Big Claus The Princess And The Pea Little Ida s Flowers Little Tiny Or Thumbelina The Saucy Boy The Travelling Companion The Little Mermaid The Emperor s New Suit The Goloshes Of Fortune The Daisy The Brave Tin Soldier The Wild Swans The Garden Of Paradise The Flying Trunk The Storks The Elf Of The Rose What The Moon Saw The Wicked Prince The Metal Pig The Shepherd s Story Of The Bond Of Friendship A Rose From Homer s Grave The Buckwheat Ole Luk Oie, The Dream God The Swineherd The Angel The Nightingale The Ugly Duckling The Top And Ball The Fir Tree The Snow Queen The Little Elder Tree Mother The Elfin Hill The Red Shoes The Jumper The Shepherdess And The Sweep Holger Danske The Bell Grandmother The Darning Needle The Little Match Seller The Sunbeam And The Captive By The Almshouse Window The Old Street Lamp The Neighbouring Families Little Tuk The Shadow The Old House The Drop Of Water The Happy Family The Story Of A Mother The Shirt Collar The Flax The Phoenix Bird A Story The Puppet Show Man The Dumb Book The Old Grave Stone The Conceited Apple Branch The Loveliest Rose In The World In A Thousand Years The Swan s Nest The Story Of The Year There Is No Doubt About It A Cheerful Temper A Great Grief Everything In The Right Place The Goblin And The Huckster Under The Willow Tree The Pea Blossom She Was Good For Nothing The Last Pearl Two Maidens In The Uttermost Parts Of The Sea The Money Box A Leaf From Heaven Jack The Dullard Ib And Little Christina The Thorny Road Of Honor The Jewish Maiden The Bell Deep The Bottle Neck Soup From A Sausage Skewer The Old Bachelor s Nightcap Something The Last Dream Of The Old Oak The Marsh King s Daughter The Races The Philosopher s Stone The Story Of The Wind The Girl Who Trod On The Loaf Ole The Tower Keeper Anne Lisbeth Children s Prattle The Child In The Grave Two Brothers The Pen And The Inkstand The Farm Yard Cock And The Weathercock Beauty Of Form And Beauty Of Mind A Story From The Sand Hills The Butterfly The Bishop Of B0rglum And His Warriors The Mail Coach Passengers The Beetle Who Went On His Travels What The Old Man Does Is Always Right The Snow Man The Portuguese Duck The Ice Maiden The Psyche The Snail And The Rose Tree The Old Church Bell The Silver Shilling The Snowdrop The Bird Of Popular Song The Will O The Wisp Is In The Town, Says The Moor Woman The Windmill In The Nursery The Golden Treasure The Storm Shakes The Shield Delaying Is Not Forgetting The Porter s Son andOthers 2013 1384 1470 19 28 39 32 53

  2. says:

    Book Review4 out of 5 stars to The Complete Fairy Tales, written in 1835 by Hans Christian Andersen Many people are familiar with the fairy tales written by the Grimm brothers, but sometimes don t realize there were several different versions or collections by different authors Another popular one is the series written by Hans Christian Anderson The two I was the most familiar with were The Ugly Duckling and The Emperor s New Clothes In both, you see some of the horror thatBook Review4 out of 5 stars to The Complete Fairy Tales, written in 1835 by Hans Christian Andersen Many people are familiar with the fairy tales written by the Grimm brothers, but sometimes don t realize there were several different versions or collections by different authors Another popular one is the series written by Hans Christian Anderson The two I was the most familiar with were The Ugly Duckling and The Emperor s New Clothes In both, you see some of the horror that you see from other classic fairy tales, but these areabout reality and real life situations that could occur Also, they don t always end up a positive note A few movies have been made from them, and countless cartoons and TV shows I enjoyed some of them, but not all of them I do think they are worth a read, as they provide some insight into the goings on of a working mind nearly 200 years ago It s true to form stories that have a basis in moral lessons versus coming of age sentiments Both are valuable, but they are a bit different Not quite for young children, probably better for pre teens or teenagersAbout MeFor those new to me or my reviews here s the scoop I read A LOT I write A LOT And now I blog A LOT First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at where you ll also find TV Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I ve visited all over the world And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who what when where and my pictures Leave a comment and let me know what you think Vote in the poll and ratings Thanks for stopping by

  3. says:

    Not a fan of Hans Christian Anderson at all Most of his stories were short and pointless and the ones with morals made me feel like I was being preached to I just can t get with the religious tone of his stories or the weird way women are treated like the little mermaid sacrificing herself off the boat, or the prince who tries to court the emperor s daughter but she rejects him so he pretends to be a swine herder and tricks her into getting disowned with him for kissing him and then basically Not a fan of Hans Christian Anderson at all Most of his stories were short and pointless and the ones with morals made me feel like I was being preached to I just can t get with the religious tone of his stories or the weird way women are treated like the little mermaid sacrificing herself off the boat, or the prince who tries to court the emperor s daughter but she rejects him so he pretends to be a swine herder and tricks her into getting disowned with him for kissing him and then basically leaves her homeless because that s what she deserves for rejecting an honest prince, or when the guy who journey s with the other guy beats the princess while following her and she thinks its a hail storm I could go on and on I literally did not get anything constructive from reading any of the stories and only finished reading the book because I have this compulsive need to finish a book once I start it

  4. says:

    If you want to read the real stories that inspired the lion s share of Disney films, definitely read Mr Andersen s collection of fairy tales Do not expect happy endings however leave those to Walt Co Instead imagine families trying to scare their kids into behaving in order to survive the many dangers in this world represented fantastically by witches and wolves and other beasties and meanies A wonderful collection If you want to read the real stories that inspired the lion s share of Disney films, definitely read Mr Andersen s collection of fairy tales Do not expect happy endings however leave those to WaltCo Instead imagine families trying to scare their kids into behaving in order to survive the many dangers in this world represented fantastically by witches and wolves and other beasties and meanies A wonderful collection

  5. says:

    Hans Christian Andersen once said,Life itself is the most wonderful fairy taleAnd his life certainly was an extraordinary rags to riches story In all Hans Christian Andersen wrote 156 fairy tales, of which forty are in this luxury, large format edition, to represent the cream of the crop It is a beautiful, sumptuous book, the semi matt purple cover slightly textured and embossed, giving almost a padded feel It has a feature reminiscent of medallions in old books in this case an inset Hans Christian Andersen once said,Life itself is the most wonderful fairy taleAnd his life certainly was an extraordinary rags to riches story In all Hans Christian Andersen wrote 156 fairy tales, of which forty are in this luxury, large format edition, to represent the cream of the crop It is a beautiful, sumptuous book, the semi matt purple cover slightly textured and embossed, giving almost a padded feel It has a feature reminiscent of medallions in old books in this case an inset glossy illustration of a mermaid The paper throughout is glossy, and most pages are bordered with patterns and old gold surrounds Three gold colours are used the spine is a slightly brighter gold, and the page edges are shiny and gilt edged, plus there is a gold ribbon bookmark attached There is an interesting introduction by the translator, Neil Philip, plus copious, carefully drawn illustrations by Isabelle Brent These are mostly in gouache, and the illustrator makes much use of jewel colours, patterning and many magnificent gold highlights It is a book which simply begs to be picked up.The choice of purple and gold is perhaps significant, since it is clear that Hans Christian Andersen believed himself to be a member of the royal family Not only that, but he tortured himself with the belief that he was unacknowledged royalty, who had been cast out, and this conviction plagued him all his life Interestingly, although there will probably never be any proof of Hans Christian Andersen s true birth, it is not simply an idle dream, but a genuine possibility.Hans Christian Andersen may have been the illegitimate son of Crown Prince Christian Frederik, later Christian VIII, and the teenage countess Elise Ahlefeldt Laurvig He was born in 1805 at Broholm Castle near Odense Both Hans Christian Andersen s official parents worked at the castle, his mother as a nursemaid, and his father , a cobbler for the family There had also been a precedent for an illegitimate daughter Fanny to have been adopted by another servant of the Royal family a year earlier.Hans Christian Andersen seems to have had a privileged position with this family Rather than play with the other poor children, he was allowed to play with Prince Christian Frederik s son, Prince Fritz, who was three years younger than him When this prince later died, Hans Christian Andersen was the only person, not in the family, who was allowed to view the body privately.When he was seven years of age, Hans Christian Andersen s official father was paid to serve in the Napoleonic wars, in place of a local landowner He returned four years later, a broken man, and died in the Spring Hans s mother was now destitute, with few choices as she was illiterate, so she took in washing, standing waist deep for hours in the icy river, trying to stay warm by taking nips of schnapps Two years later she married another shoemaker, who took no interest in the young Hans Hence Hans Christian Andersen grew up in heartbreaking poverty, and all his life remained self conscious about his lower class background, despite his success Perhaps it is because he was born poor that he was obsessed with social class, and always trying to claw his way to the top He seemed to both worship the nobility but also resent them for holding him at arm s length He was of course dependent on the patronage of the wealthy to create his art Whatever the cause, Hans Christian Andersen s stories portray everyone from invented royalty, to the truly destitute He believed,Every man s life is a fairy tale written by God s fingers Hans Christian Andersen was awkward and earnest gawky, ill at ease, and always feeling he was picked on by all and sundry Many of his protagonists are obvious depictions of himself caring a lot what other people thought of them and worried about fitting inThe Emperor s New ClothesandThe Ugly Ducklingare clear examples Yet even battling all his worries, Hans Christian Andersen managed to find his voice and write his stories In many of his stories he seems to explore ideas about wealth, self worth, and the meaning of life.Many other aspects of the author s life feed into his stories, which were quite an eye opener to read If you think that he wrote nice stories for children, then perhaps think again Some of them are very dark in tone, and most are quite depressing He has been called apoet of human sufferingStory after story ends in rejection, humiliation or disappointment Many of the stories feature a downtrodden protagonist Sometimes the main character will work hard, and then have a wonderful fairytale ending Perhaps they are lucky, becoming rich, or famous, or falling in love, or a combination of these Sometimes our downtrodden protagonist works hard, and is just about to achieve fulfilment in one of these ways but then suddenly dies for no particular reason Sometimes there is no change at all, and the downtrodden protagonist remains downtrodden And then probably dies The downtrodden protagonist is not alwaysheSometimes it is asheOr equally often it may be a household object, or a flower, a tree, or an animal Hans Christian Andersen s stories are fantasies, like dreams or visions The object or creature will have a personality of its own, often showing a boastful or arrogant side it will talk to other creatures or objects and then die Sometimes the story does not even seem to be a moral fable perhaps the object does not seem to have a bad side but it will probably die nonetheless His stories often feature children usually a perfect vision of children who are like miniature adults doing various good things Sometimes they die too Sometimes the protagonists do not themselves die, but lose a loved one, and must accept that God is in charge of everything even when they do not understand the reason And in this way, through every single story, there seems to be a common thread Hans Christian Andersen s tales are full of ideas about God, angels, faith, the Bible, the afterlife, and sin He constantly reflects on what it takes to get into heaven, the various wicked things people do, and the nature of God, love, and forgiveness Considering that the author himself said the stories were for children, it seems remarkable that they are so preoccupied with the darker side of being human People sin, he says, and darkness often lives in our hearts and souls He clearly thinks that all humans are sinners and should live in fear of God, but he also keeps reinforcing the redemptive power of love and faith Many of Hans Christian Andersen s stories end up with the characters in heaven Although not exactly a Catholic, his views and expressed beliefs certainly inclined that way.Hans Christian Andersen did not start out by writing fairy tales, although that is what we remember him for Even as a child he had artistic leanings, becoming swept up by theTales from the Arabian Nightswhich his father told him, and the toy theatre his father had made The young Hans played with this, and made clothes for his dolls, dreaming of becoming an actor, a singer or a dancer After his father died he left home to seek his fortune in Copenhagen, committed to an artistic life He attached himself to various well to do families, successfully courted the attention of wealthy and influential people, one after another, and even had his fees at the Ballet School of the Royal Theatre paid However this attendance was a short lived experience His teachers there crushed him by saying that helacked both the appearance and the talent necessary for the stageHans Christian Andersen was incredibly sensitive to slights all his life Every cruel remark, or casual, careless comment would be taken to heart and never forgotten So his wealthy patrons transferred their money to educating him at a private school for gentlemen But he found this experience a torment too, saying,it will destroy my soulIt led to him writing a sentimental, maudlin poem calledThe Dying ChildBut with a stroke of luck, the poem was published in the newspaperThe Copenhagen Postin 1827, and the young man s future was assured Hans Christian Andersen s first writing projects included a play, a book of poetry and a travelogue The promising young author then won a grant from the king, and this enabled him to travel across Europe and work on being an author He wrote a novel about his time in Italy, which was published in 1835, the same year as he began writing his stories calledeventyr , or fairy tales and often based on ideas from folk tales that he had heard or read as a child.Another of his preoccupations was to try out new places He had a wanderlust, and an urge to flee from what he considered to be provincial life There are echoes of this in his works InFive Peas in the Same Podall the peas are happy until one needs to explore the world outside InThe Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep , the couple brave all kinds of adventures, in search of something better There are many instances of someone trying out their wings Hans Christian Andersen himself travelled relentlessly, but had a morbid fear of death Wherever he laid his head, there next to him was a coil of rope which he took everywhere with him, and a handwritten notice, saying,I only seem deadHe was obsessed with the thought that he might lapse into a coma, and be buried before he could come round In fact he kept this strange morbid dread of being buried alive through to the very day he died Over the next few decades, until his death in 1875, he continued to write for both children and adults He wrote several autobiographies, and also travel narratives and poetry about the Scandinavian people In 1845, English translations of Hans Christian Andersen s fairy tales and stories began to gain the attention of foreign audiences He became a friend of Charles Dickens, who was already enormously popular, although this friendship ended in failure after Hans Christian Andersen had overstayed his welcome at the great author s home Charles Dickens rather spitefully put up a notice on the wall of his bedroom, after Hans Christian Andersen had left It read,Hans Christian Andersen slept in this room for five weeks which seemed to the family AGESIt was in England that Hans Christian Andersen s stories first became classics, despite originally being written in Danish They had a strong influence on subsequent British children s authors, including George MacDonald, Oscar Wilde, A.A Milne and Beatrix Potter Over time, Scandinavian audiences then discovered his stories, and now of course they are known world wide.Hans Christian Andersen s tales seem to have universal appeal, no matter what language they are read in His stories express themes that transcend age and nationality often presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity They are written in a very chatty intimate style, which won him no favours from his original literary critics, who considered this tone inappropriate But once he found his voice, he found he could not stop writing them, saying,They forced themselves from meA friend once expostulated,You re capable of writing about anything even a darning needleAnd sure enough, the author rose to the challenge, in his story entitledThe Darning NeedleThe stories are clearly cathartic, but also full of beauty, tragedy, nature, religion, artfulness, deception, betrayal, love, death, judgement and penance And very occasionally one has a happy ending.The author called his autobiographyThe Fairy Tale of my Life , and indeed his life reads like a traditional fairy tale Think what the blurb might beThe son of an illiterate washerwoman and a poor cobbler, who may secretly be a royal prince, who, through sheer persistence and influential help from an unlikely source, becomes a world famous author, in a privileged position, hobnobbing with royaltyperhaps Ironically, at the age of fourteen, when he left home, he had predicted this outcome,First you go through terrible suffering and then you become famous Charles Perrault had collected fairy tales from many cultural traditions in 1697, and just over a century later in 1808 Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm collected German folk and fairy tales Later still, Hans Christian Andersen s first fairy tales followed this template of rewriting a traditional story, but in fact only eight out of a total of 156 are direct retellings of Danish folk tales He quickly moved on to writing his own and you can certainly tell Every single one seems to be about an aspect of himself, and he freely admitted,I was always the chief person , the gawky ugly duckling who didn t quite fit in His friend H.C Orsted had said to him,Your novel will make you famous, but the fairy tales will make you immortal .I have rarely felt such ambivalence towards an author These fairy stories are probably by the only author for whom my personal rating of works varies between one and five stars He is an extraordinary writer, but I cannot say that I have enjoyed very many of his tales many of them I have had to steel myself to read It will certainly be a while before I read another big book of fairy stories, after ploughing through two collections ofTales from the Arabian Nightsand now this one The stories vary in standard and taste so much, that I have given this volume my default rating of three stars And because of this, I have felt it necessary to review nearly all in fact thirty five of the stories in this collection separately, whenever they have been published as individual books Please see my shelves for links, if you wish to read my review of a particular story.The 40 stories in this volume are The Princess and the Pea Thumbelina The Swineherd The Buckwheat The Wild Swans The Darning Needle The Nightingale The Teapot The Ugly Duckling The Snow Queen The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep The Last Dream of the Old Oak Tree The Shadow It s Perfectly True Grief Father s Always Right The Snowman The Snail and the Rose Tree Something The Fir Tree The Tinderbox Little Ida s Flowers The Little Mermaid The Emperor s New ClothesThe Steadfast Tin SoldierThe Flying TrunkThe Sweethearts She Was No Good The BellThe Little Match Girl The CollarThe Goblin at the Grocer sIn a Thousand Years TimeFive Peas from the Same Pod The Beetle The Toad Dance, Dance, Dolly Mine The Flax The Gardener and his MasterThe Book of Fairy Tales

  6. says:

    Although some of the tales are really disturbing, the fantasy and imagination behind them is indisputable I grew up reading this book and I m sure it ll be valuable for all future generations.

  7. says:

    Strangely, despite four decades on Earth, I have almost no familiarity with this gentleman Hans If I can live another 4 decades, I doubt I ll forget about him from here on out What is most generally striking perplexing to me is how these stories came to be known as children tales, came to be widely accepted and popular rather than scorned I don t think it s just my glasses that view Hans Christian Andersen as a soul that sensesdarkness than light Yes, every year the trees have new, fr Strangely, despite four decades on Earth, I have almost no familiarity with this gentleman Hans If I can live another 4 decades, I doubt I ll forget about him from here on out What is most generally striking perplexing to me is how these stories came to be known as children tales, came to be widely accepted and popular rather than scorned I don t think it s just my glasses that view Hans Christian Andersen as a soul that sensesdarkness than light Yes, every year the trees have new, fresh leaves, but that is not true of the human heart From a Window in Vartov HCA desperately wants and loves beauty, yearns for music and poetry and life and innocence, and so we get this at the center of so many of his tales, but at the same time it is mostly apparent that these ideals are but dreams that we must continually reach for, work for, cherish when they sparingly come, because what this world is really filled with is darkness He seems to say, feel both beauty and evil, know them both, accept them both, but my heart pains that the former will never have the upper hand Throughout his tales I find his dreamy poetics are amazingly served with a shimmering personal touch they are not distant, community built folktales There are also wonderful juxtapositions, magical paradoxes, and a communicative simplicity that can travel, like a drop in the lake, as deeply as the reader wishes to take things At the same time, there are many stories of a different breed which will never make it to Disney Stories like Two Virgins Two Maidens, In the Duck Yard, and The Cock and the Weathercock dish out satire as sharp as any I ve ever encountered Sharp not only in its depth of understanding, but also in both heavy handedness and bitterness Word play, symbolism, and connections in these stories are as far from innocence and naivete as you will find.Other not so well known stories such as A Drop of Water and The Shadow are probably my favorites so far Both are extremely intense and particularly revelatory regarding how HCA views human behavior and human nature Very direct, dark and twisted, but done in unique and colorful ways, they continue to show that HCA was not a simple children s man or the one trick pony that permeates much of his recognition.And at some point, I don t recall exactly when, I began to think a lot of Kafka while reading HCA What are the connections In a time when the construction of myths and fairy tales is practically extinct, when even the originals are mostly watered down and considered antiquated, Mr Andersen delivered his most pleasant winds not so long ago and they stretch back to not only the earliest of human experience, but also connect just as strongly to us sensitives amongst moderns This is a tome to keep bedside, never finishing, never repeating

  8. says:

    You should call things by their true names, and even if you don t do so usually, you ought to in a fairy tale. HCA, The Rose Tree Regiment I enjoyed most the first section, from The Sandman, a series of pleasant dreams for good children I ll have to read it in full some time.As for the rest, they were mostly better known Andersen tales, all of which I had read before, some even previously illustrated by Zwerger as stand alone picture books So, nice illustrations, big text blocks, familiar You should call things by their true names, and even if you don t do so usually, you ought to in a fairy tale. HCA, The Rose Tree Regiment I enjoyed most the first section, from The Sandman, a series of pleasant dreams for good children I ll have to read it in full some time.As for the rest, they were mostly better known Andersen tales, all of which I had read before, some even previously illustrated by Zwerger as stand alone picture books So, nice illustrations, big text blocks, familiar stories Nothing to wrote home about unless you ve not read them before.My favorite was from Thumbelina, because doesn t the flower fairy prince totally look like a douche trying to make it with some innocent teen

  9. says:

    There are some good stories here, and some that scarred my childhood Between dead match girls and trashed fir trees not to mention frightening Snow Queens the Thumblinias were sometimes needed Still they last Excuse me I didn t get much sleep last night, there was something poking my back under my 20 mattresses.

  10. says:

    This is an absolutely fantastic collection of Hans Christian Andersen s best work The translation, by Tiina Nunnally, is sublime and her notes on past translations of Andersen s stories makes it clear just how sublime it is If you wanted to read a version closer to H.C Andersen s original, you d have to read these in Danish.Jackie Wullschlager s introduction is easily one of the best I ve read and an essential lens through which to better understand these tales Short of reading Wullschlager This is an absolutely fantastic collection of Hans Christian Andersen s best work The translation, by Tiina Nunnally, is sublime and her notes on past translations of Andersen s stories makes it clear just how sublime it is If you wanted to read a version closer to H.C Andersen s original, you d have to read these in Danish.Jackie Wullschlager s introduction is easily one of the best I ve read and an essential lens through which to better understand these tales Short of reading Wullschlager s biography of Andersen, Hans Christian Andersen The Life of a Storyteller , I think you d be hard pressed to read awonderful account of Andersen s life and stories than this 32 page introduction.And what about the stories themselves The stories are, of course, phenomenal This is the first time I ve read any of Andersen s stories since I was a child and, if possible, I enjoyed reading them evenas an adult All the witticisms and references to Andersen s life that you don t pick up on as a child are to be savored as an adult.Many of these stories I had never read or heard before, so I was also surprised and brought back to what it was like to be a child again so enrapturing are these tales There are a total of 30 to be found in this lovely collection, some utterly delightful, others surprisingly dark, and still others that perhaps pale in comparison to the rest But one thing that is for sure is that these tales are rendered by Tiiny Nunnally to be enjoyed better than ever before in English.1 The Tinderbox 5 StarsYes, this is a 5 star story to be sure More folk than fairy, this tale is in fact based on an older Danish folktale that Andersen transformed with his characteristic wit It features an A decapitation and glorious references to sugar pigs, cake wives, and social status It s stupendous.2 Little Claus and Big Claus 5 starsSo when I saw the title for some reason I thought that this was going to have something to do with Santa Claus until I realized that, oh yes, Claus is actually a name for ordinary people as well specifically, Germanic men But that aside, this is a hilarious story, also based on a Danish folktale, about an awfully clever little fellow who performs some delightful tricks 3 The Princess on the Pea 5 starsThis is a simple little story but I liked it all the same One of Andersen sfamous, it has been at last been rendered into English with the correct title previously this was widely known in English as The Princess AND the Pea A princess who s able to feel a pea beneath 20 mattresses and 20 quilts Why, that s something special indeed How the pea didn t get squashed is something I would have enjoyed learning.4 Thumbelina 5 starsAnother Andersen classic, Thumbelina is a delightful tale and at times a bit scary Inspired by the folktale Tom Thumb , this one concerns a little thumb sized lady and her adventures out in the big wide world You ll never look at moles the same way 5 The Traveling Companion 5 starsThis is the first story in the collection that I don t remember having heard before And it is absolutely fabulous Quite darker than the ones that preceded it as well To call it the Danish Rumplestiltskin doesn t quite do it justice, and I actually think I liked it better than that famous Grimm Brothers tale 6 The Little Mermaid 5 starsThe most famous of Andersen s stories and, in my opinion, the best The Disney adaptation, which is almostfamous now than the original, is one of Disney s best films and it is still a terrible adaptation This has it all, including an almost perfect ending I saw almost because the last page of this feels tacked on The Little Mermaid throws herself from the ship into the sea, and her body dissolves into foam That should have been the end But instead we get a bizarre bit about daughters of the air and an obvious plea to children to be good That tarnishes what would have otherwise been a perfect tale But, even tarnished, this is still the great writer s best.7 The Emperor s New Clothes 5 starsAfter The Little Mermaid , this is likely my favorite of Andersen s stories, and after The Little Mermaid it s also probably his most famous You all know the story, no need for me to recap it here, but I was surprised to learn that the little boy s famous cry at the end of But he doesn t have anything on was hastily added by Andersen after the story had already been sent off to the printer s This is a satire as excellent and brilliant today, in the age of Trump, as ever.8 The Steadfast Tin Soldier 5 starsDelightfully poetic This is the first of Andersen s stories in this collection to feature inanimate objects brought to life I d never noticed how clearly Andersen influenced later films like Toy Story until I read this story about the quite appropriately named Steadfast Tin Soldier.9 The Wild Swans 5 starsAnother classic, albeit one I wasn t too familiar with This one is also based on a classic European folktale, and it s got all the famous elements we see in other tales like Cinderella Evil stepmother, a bit of magic, and the transformative power of love.10 The Flying Trunk 3 starsThis is a sort of story within a story, one involving matches and some dishware, and the other the titular trunk and a Turkish engagement If only our rich merchant s son could have resisted the urge to set off those fireworks11 The Nightingale 5 starsSurprisingly sweet, this story of the Chinese Emperor and his obsession with the nightingale took a number of unexpected turns Andersen was clearly in high spirits when he wrote this one.12 The Sweethearts 4 starsThis thought provoking tale feels like something Andersen wrote after having become the most famous writer in Denmark and one of the most famous in all Europe and thinking back on when a woman he loved rejected him and, lo and behold, it was All I can say is, that ball deserved it.13 The Ugly Duckling 5 starsCome on You know you love this one Another one with clear allusions to Andersen s life.14 The Fir Tree 4 starsIt s only once you ve grown up that you realize that all that urgency to grow up was unwarranted A reminder to slow down and savor life while you can.15 The Snow Queen 5 starsThis is one of Andersen sbeloved tales, and it features some beautiful moments and spectacular images The first part, about the mirror, is haunting, and thisthan any of Andersen s other tales seems to deal with the battle between good and evil Reading it, I was reminded of Philip Pullman s His Dark Materials trilogy.16 The Red Shoes 3 starsBehave yourselves, children Don t you wear red shoes when you ought to be wearing black ones or you ll be forced to dance dance dance 17 The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep 3 starsWorth it just for the final line and they loved each other until they broke.18 The Shadow 5 starsWoah I was not expecting that This reads muchlike something Franz Kafka would have written than Hans Christian Andersen Surprisingly dark and spookily strange There s nothing else quite like it in Andersen s oeuvre 19 The Old House 4 starsThere s something surprisingly spooky about this store, reportedly much beloved by Charles Dickens That poor tin soldier20 The Little Match Girl 5 starsSpeaking of Charles Dickens, this gorgeous and heartwrenching story is H.C Andersen at his most Dickensian The image of the Little Match Girl, shuddering with cold while staring into the windows of those whose tables were laden with New Year s feasts is absolutely haunting One of Andersen s best.21 The Story of a Mother 4 starsAndersen s misery at his repressed bisexuality and societal isolation made for some incredible tales, not least this one It all begs the question whose stories are better Happy Hans or Miserable Hans 22 The Collar 3 starsSo I ve decided I m not as big a fan of Andersen s stories that feature inanimate objects as primary characters as much as I am the others This one I found rather ho hum Though it is amusingly self deprecating.23 The Bell 3 starsThis one was pleasant enough, but failed to leave much of an impact.24 The Marsh King s Daughter 2 starsI thought this one was much too long, featured too many religious overtones, and was ultimately quite unmemorable Overshadowed by many, much better, stories.25 The Wind Tells of Valdemar Daae and His Daughters 2 starsI don t think the wind told it best.26 The Snowman 4 starsOne can once again see evidence of Andersen s suppressed desires in the Snowman s desperately wanting to be with the Stove Something that European society at the time would have certainly found most unnatural.27 The Ice Maiden 5 starsThis fantastic story, set in Switzerland, is one of the best in the collection Two people, stranded on the island in the little lake, until the Ice Maiden calls the other away An image both beautiful and haunting.28 The Wood Nymph 4 starsBeautiful, uncorrupted nature versus the corrupt hustle and bustle of the city Andersen as environmentalist, perhaps 29 The Most Incredible Thing 5 starsOn art and those who would seek to eradicate it Used during WWII by the Danish Resistance Without art, without culture, there is nothing.30 Auntie Toothache 4 starsThis was the last story Hans Christian Andersen ever wrote Andersen suffered from toothaches his entire life 19th century European dentistry not being what it is today , and here he has his protagonist, a poet, receives a visit from the titular Auntie Toothache, who promises pain unless the poet should give up writing forever Humanity has to be grateful that Andersen himself never made such an agreement

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