The Reluctant Admiral: Yamamoto and the Imperial Navy



❮PDF / Epub❯ ✅ The Reluctant Admiral: Yamamoto and the Imperial Navy ❤ Author Hiroyuki Agawa – E17streets4all.co.uk An intimate portrait of the man who planned the attack on Pearl Harbor and died a dramatic death in the South Pacific An intimate portrait of the Admiral: Yamamoto Epub á man who planned the attack on Pearl Harbor and died a dramatic death in the South Pacific.The Reluctant Admiral: Yamamoto and the Imperial Navy

Hiroyuki Agawa Agawa Hiroyuki is Admiral: Yamamoto Epub á a Japanese author born on December , , in Hiroshima, Japan He is known for his fiction centered on World War II, as well as his biographies and essaysAs a high school student Agawa was influenced by the Japanese author Naoya Shiga He entered the Tokyo Imperial University to study Japanese literature Upon graduation in , Agawa was conscripted to serve in the The Reluctant PDF \ Imperial Japanese Navy, where he worked as an intelligence officer breaking Chinese military codes until the end of the war He returned to Hiroshima, where his parents had experienced the atomic bomb, in March After World War II Agawa wrote his first short story Nennen Saisai Years upon Years, , which was a classic I Novel, or autobiographical novel, recounting the reunion with his parents It follows the Reluctant Admiral: Yamamoto Kindle Ò style of Naoya Shiga, who is said to have praised the work August as Agawa notes in a postscript, combines the stories of friends and acquaintances who experienced the bombing into the testimony of one family Occupation censorship at the time was strict, but the story passed because, the author later observed, it made no reference to the problems of after effect and continued no overt criticism of the US Agawa came to popular and critical attention with his Citadel in Spring , , which was awarded the Yomiuri Prize He later revisited the same theme of his experiences as a student soldier in Kurai hato Dark waves, Ma no isan Devil s Heritage, , a documentary novel, is an account of the bombing of Hirosima through the eyes of a young Tokyo reporter, handling, among other topics, the death of his Hiroshima nephew and survivors reactions to the Atomic bomb Casualty Commission, the US agency that conducted research on atomic victimsAgawa s four major biographical novels are Yamamoto Isoroku , , Yonai Mitsumasa , , Inoue Seibi , , and Shiga Naoya , His other major works include Kumo no bohyo Grave markers in the clouds, , and Gunkan Nagato no shogai The life of the warship Nagato, Agawa was awarded the Order of Culture Bunka Kunsho in from Wikipedia.

The Reluctant Admiral: Yamamoto and the Imperial Navy
  • Hardcover
  • 397 pages
  • The Reluctant Admiral: Yamamoto and the Imperial Navy
  • Hiroyuki Agawa
  • English
  • 11 December 2019
  • 0870113550

10 thoughts on “The Reluctant Admiral: Yamamoto and the Imperial Navy

  1. says:

    This provides a refreshing perspective on Admiral Yamamoto, and is well translated It portrays him as a very human man, with a lot of intelligence and foresight The Yamamoto portrayed by this book is a man to be admired, who found himself faced with an impossible problem.There are a few points in the book where the book departs from being a biography and turns into an expository essay meant to argue a point that must have been a contentious issue at the time For example, the section on whet This provides a refreshing perspective on Admiral Yamamoto, and is well translated It portrays him as a very human man, with a lot of intelligence and foresight The Yamamoto portrayed by this book is a man to be admired, who found himself faced with an impossible problem.There are a few points in the book where the book departs from being a biography and turns into an expository essay meant to argue a point that must have been a contentious issue at the time For example, the section on whether or not the United States knew about pearl harbour before the attack As someone two generations away from the second world war who is neither American nor Japanese, that section made me feel like I was reading someone summarize an argument they had on a random internet forum You can tell that sensitive topics such as these invoked a considerable amount of emotion.The part of the book I liked the least and the reason I gave it three stars instead of four is that the author came across in numerous places to be a very superstitious person, who believes in omens and other such things

  2. says:

    I had the opportunity to live for 3 years as a child in Niigata, Japan, not far from where Yamamoto was buried I found the book very educational in describing the man who wished so much to prevent Japan joining the Tripartite pact with Germany and Italy and to prevent the subsequent decision by Japan to enter the WWII Some minor historical errors and perhaps a little bit of inaccuracy in reports of action There was mention that during the battle of Midway the aircraft carrier Hiryu had been I had the opportunity to live for 3 years as a child in Niigata, Japan, not far from where Yamamoto was buried I found the book very educational in describing the man who wished so much to prevent Japan joining the Tripartite pact with Germany and Italy and to prevent the subsequent decision by Japan to enter the WWII Some minor historical errors and perhaps a little bit of inaccuracy in reports of action There was mention that during the battle of Midway the aircraft carrier Hiryu had been hit by 26 torpedos, plus 70 bombs, yet still had an operating flight deck A bit of exaggeration there, but that happens in battle Good read overall despite the book being now almost 50 years old

  3. says:

    I was originally perplexed but ultimately fascinated by Mr Agawa s account of Adm Yamamoto s life I was perplexed because the book does not cover Adm Yamamoto s life before the 1930 s The book begins with his appointment as Commander in Chief of the Imperial Japanese Navy IJN , then flips back to the early 1930 s, when he was a delegate to the London Naval Conferences, when England, the United States and Japan sought to reach agreement on the size of their navies to prevent an arms race I was originally perplexed but ultimately fascinated by Mr Agawa s account of Adm Yamamoto s life I was perplexed because the book does not cover Adm Yamamoto s life before the 1930 s The book begins with his appointment as Commander in Chief of the Imperial Japanese Navy IJN , then flips back to the early 1930 s, when he was a delegate to the London Naval Conferences, when England, the United States and Japan sought to reach agreement on the size of their navies to prevent an arms race The story continues through the rest of Yamamoto s life through his death in 1943 but never tells us much about the time before 1930, which I found odd Nevertheless, this is a fascinating read for several reasons First of all, the author is Japanese I read the book in translation and he undoubtedly approaches and treats his subject in a way that is different from what a Western writer would do The author seemed to have an easy understanding of the geisha culture, which Yamamoto clearly enjoyed The author also interviewed or talked with people who knew and interacted with Yamamoto or were otherwise important to his story I suspect these individuals werecomfortable talking about Adm Yamamoto with a fellow countryman than they would have been in talking with someone who was not Japanese, although that is conjecture on my part A most interesting period in the book and one that is probably not that well known is when Adm Yamamoto was Vice Minister of the Navy in the late 1930 s In this position, he strongly opposed the view of the Japanese Army that Japan should draw closer to Germany in foreign affairs since he knew this would ultimately pit Japan against England and the United States In fact, he was so outspoken and persistent in his views that many of his friends and colleagues feared he would be assassinated It is believed that one reason Yamamoto was named Commander in Chief of the IJN was to get him out of Tokyo and harm s way Once it became clear to Yamamoto that the Army and its supporters in the government were intent on going to war against England and the U.S., Yamamoto devised the plan to attack the U.S Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor Yamamoto has been reviled for this but the book makes clear that he was opposed to war hence the title of The Reluctant Admiral and came up with the plan as the only way he could see to win a war with the U.S Having lived in the U.S twice, and having seen the factories in and around Detroit and the sprawling oil fields in Texas, Yamamoto realized that Japan could not possibly win a protracted war and had to land a knockout blow early on to have any hope of winning the war or at least obtaining a favorable negotiated peace It seems that, oddly, once war came, the IJN did not have a clear plan of what it would do after the attack on Pearl Harbor The planning for what became the attack on Midway was not completed until April of 1942 and little time was set aside for the Japanese carrier force, the Kid Butai, to rest and regroup after it had ranged far and wide in the Indian Ocean, where it sank some British warships at Sri Lanka Yamamoto s thinking and mindset after Midway became increasingly pessimistic, at least as revealed in letters to close friends, since he clearly knew that, the longer the war lasted, the weaker were Japan s chances of winning or achieving an acceptable negotiated peace.To bolster morale in April of 1943, Yamamoto went to Rabaul, the main Japanese base for the campaigns on Guadalcanal and in the Solomon Islands, to visit units and talk with soldiers and sailors The idea of getting yet closer to the front appears to have originated with Yamamoto himself and, when other naval officers learned he planned to fly closer to the combat zone, they urged him not to He went ahead, of course, and his plane was intercepted and shot down over Bougainville The portions of the book dealing with what became Yamamoto s last flight and the valiant efforts of soldiers and sailors to find the downed plane are poignant and sad I would say they are also well written but writing throughout the book was good.In the pages of this fine biography, Isoroku Yamamoto comes across as an interesting and extremely intelligent man who had few peers He loved gambling and games and once said that, if he really wanted to help his country, he should move to Monaco and win a lot of money for Japan at games of chance Yamamoto was also playful One of my favorite stories in the book is about one night when he went out with a woman and while walking away from a restaurant, walked bowlegged for several hundred feet in an effort to imitate Charlie Chaplin Some sailors saw him and could not believe they were looking and laughing at the great Isoroku Yamamoto, the C in C, as they called him.I was genuinely sad when Yamamoto met his demise and this fine book came to an end He comes across as a likable man who viewed the IJN as a defensive force, not as a weapon to wage a war of aggression against a major industrial power he knew Japan was unlikely to defeat Perhaps if there had beenmen like Yamamoto in high places in the Japanese government in the late 1930 s, the horror of World War II in the Pacific could have been avoided

  4. says:

    I pretty much never read nonfiction, but after visiting the Pearl Harbor museum just outside my hometown of Honolulu, I grew interested in Admiral Yamamoto, the Japanese admiral who launched the attack on Pearl Harbor The Reluctant Admiral is excellently translated I really like the writer s voice clear, informed, and opinionated in a way that is compelling rather than overbearing It is at its best as a character study of Isoroku Yamamoto and the various members of the Japanese Navy Yamam I pretty much never read nonfiction, but after visiting the Pearl Harbor museum just outside my hometown of Honolulu, I grew interested in Admiral Yamamoto, the Japanese admiral who launched the attack on Pearl Harbor The Reluctant Admiral is excellently translated I really like the writer s voice clear, informed, and opinionated in a way that is compelling rather than overbearing It is at its best as a character study of Isoroku Yamamoto and the various members of the Japanese Navy Yamamoto is known for opposing the Tripartite Pact with Nazi Germany, his reluctance in going to war with America, and of course staging the gamble of the Pearl Harbor attacks He is a fascinating and complex man, taciturn yet startlingly emotional, stoic yet mischevious, charismatic yet coarse, defined by both the gambler s crudeness and foresight.There are a number of great little vignettes surrounding him One of my favorites is when he hails a taxi cab with a gloved hand, signaling a generous 50 sen tip But upon arriving at his destination, he pays 30 sen and reveals that his two left index fingers have been blown away during his time in the Japan Russo War how could he possibly hold up five fingers There s another excellent episode in which, while serving as head of the Aeronautics department, he takes on an aide with incredible superstitious, prescient power in determining optimal pilots in one glance, this aide can size up whether a man is a pilot and how good of a pilot he is The shock of the skeptical officers at his accuracy is hilarious Yamamoto s superstition and intuition certainly form an intriguing part of his character, as though it in no way defines him he himself criticizes the cultural crutch of using the will of the gods as an ideological vehicle for the actions and desires of man he has moments of foresight that defy logic Agawa himself is reasonable and logical in his analyses, but has his own small moments of suggestively supernatural or romantic belief In any other work they might be frustrating, but here I found that they gave this highly incisive work evenflavor.Though perhaps a womanizer, Yamamoto is emotionally defined by his relationships with three particular women His most personal letters are often in correspondence with his mistress Chiyoko, and these really round him out, portraying his intimate self doubts, whims, and desires I enjoyed these interludes immensely.When the spotlight began to move away from Yamamoto and focus on the catastrophe at Midway and the slow decline of Japan s wartime power, I began to lose interest, as I m not really much of a military buff the nitty gritty of military movements was mostly lost on me The navy and international politics are quite interesting, full of game theory which informs the various historical personalities who populate this biography.Overall, what an interesting and well written biography I d recommend it wholeheartedly to anyone who is interested

  5. says:

    I happened to catch a part of Tora Tora Tora on TCM, and watching S Yamamura as Admiral Yamamoto got me interested in learningabout the architect of the attack on Pearl Harbor.A quick research on the web showed that this book was considered the best biography of the man I really enjoyed reading about him, and was surprised to discover that he was actually opposed to fighting America and Britain It was also interesting to learn about the ideological differences between the Japanese Ar I happened to catch a part of Tora Tora Tora on TCM, and watching S Yamamura as Admiral Yamamoto got me interested in learningabout the architect of the attack on Pearl Harbor.A quick research on the web showed that this book was considered the best biography of the man I really enjoyed reading about him, and was surprised to discover that he was actually opposed to fighting America and Britain It was also interesting to learn about the ideological differences between the Japanese Army and Navy As an American, one thought of all Japan as singularly driven, solely focused on imperialism Highly recommended

  6. says:

    Jan 2016 I read this a long time ago On rereading Parshall and Tully on Midway, I discovered a copy of a letter I had written to the authors about Yamamoto In Parshall and Tully s book, they had stated that In he matter of lac of moral courage, Yamamoto, Nagumo, and Yamaguchi were all quie guilty as charged I wrote to them to ask if their conclusion might have been too simple, founded on the tactical or strategic issues, as I remember I had read Agawa s book in which he quoted Yamamoto fro Jan 2016 I read this a long time ago On rereading Parshall and Tully on Midway, I discovered a copy of a letter I had written to the authors about Yamamoto In Parshall and Tully s book, they had stated that In he matter of lac of moral courage, Yamamoto, Nagumo, and Yamaguchi were all quie guilty as charged I wrote to them to ask if their conclusion might have been too simple, founded on the tactical or strategic issues, as I remember I had read Agawa s book in which he quoted Yamamoto from a letter to Hori Teikichi on Oct 11, 3 I find my present position extremely odd obliged to make up my mind to and pursue unswervingly a course that is precisely the opposite of my personal views Perhaps this, too, is the will of Heaven On reading that, I thought to myself that Admiral Yamamoto was a deeply conflicted man Indeed, Agawa s book seems to build such a picture throughout So I asked Parshall and Tully, Isn t it possible that the contradictions in Admiral Yamamoto s personality had some part in leading to contradictions in his choice of strategy Basically, he was trying to avoid losing a war which he deeply believed Japan should not commence and could not win

  7. says:

    Fascinating look, not only at the life of Yamamoto, but at the Imperial Navy during the leadup and first phase of the war in the Pacific The writing style is somewhat quaint, with liberal amounts of dialogue and surprising attention to passing details like palm readers and quack alchemists However, that does not detract from the abundance of detail about Yamamoto s staunch anti war positions, his mostly correct predictions as to the hopelessness of waging war against America, and his keen unde Fascinating look, not only at the life of Yamamoto, but at the Imperial Navy during the leadup and first phase of the war in the Pacific The writing style is somewhat quaint, with liberal amounts of dialogue and surprising attention to passing details like palm readers and quack alchemists However, that does not detract from the abundance of detail about Yamamoto s staunch anti war positions, his mostly correct predictions as to the hopelessness of waging war against America, and his keen understanding of the shift to aerial warfare One side point that is very interesting is that it seems that he believed that the war would last decades, with Japan slowly being sucked dry Therefore, though he thought there was no hope of victory, he seems to have underestimated how determined the Americans would be to avenge Pearl Harbor or how quickly and successfully they would be able to harness their advantages in population size and industrial capacity for the war effort Perhaps he believed that, if Japan proved difficult enough to conquer, some sort of negotiated solution could still take place

  8. says:

    A fascinating, well researched and quite gripping book It is a portrait of a living person rather than an admiral, as interesting as life itself in those difficult days before and during WW2 Sadly, the Polish language edition I have read is rather clumsily translated I recommend getting the English original.

  9. says:

    Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto is remembered as the mastermind behind the attack on Pearl Harbor However, this wonderful biography reveals the fascinating complexity of the man and the issues of his time and place.

  10. says:

    Book of the Year 1996

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