Venices



❆ Venices kindle Epub ❤ Author Paul Morand – E17streets4all.co.uk DIPLOMAT, WRITER AND POET, traveller and socialite, friend of Proust, Giraudoux and Malraux, Paul Morand was out of the most original writers of the twentieth century He was French literature s globe DIPLOMAT, WRITER AND POET, traveller and socialite, friend of Proust, Giraudoux and Malraux, Paul Morand was out of the most original writers of the twentieth century He was French literature s globe trotter, and his delightful autobiography is far from being yet another account of a writer s life Instead it is a poetic evocation of certain scenes among Morand s rich and varied encounters and experience, filtered through the one constant in his life the one place to which he would always return Venice.Venices

Paul Morand was a French diplomat, novelist, playwright and poet, considered an early ModernistHe was a graduate of the Paris Institute of Political Studies better known as Sciences Po During the pre war period, he wrote many short books which are noted for their elegance of style, erudition, narrative concision, and for the author s observation of the countries he visited combined with his middle class viewsMorand s reputation has been marred by his stance during the Second World War, when he collaborated with the Vichy regime and was a vocal anti Semite When the Second World War ended, Morand served as an ambassador in Bern, but his position was revoked and he lived in exile in SwitzerlandPost war, he was a patron of the Hussards literary movement, which opposed Existentialism Morand went on to become a member of the Acad mie fran aise his candidature was initially rejected by Charles de Gaulle, the only instance of a President ever exercising his right to veto electees to the academy Morand was finally elected ten years later, though he still had to forgo the official investiturePaul Morand was a friend of Marcel Proust and has left valuable observations about him.

Paperback  Á Venices eBook ò
  • Paperback
  • 256 pages
  • Venices
  • Paul Morand
  • 10 May 2019
  • 1908968877

10 thoughts on “Venices

  1. says:

    I look on that world of yesteryear without resentment, nor regret quite simply, it no longer exists for me, at least, since it continues, without any bother or fuss, in a universe that is a littlebrutal, a littledoomed, and in which the average level of virtues and vice must have remainedor less constant It is merely that its ways are no longer mine there s nothing left for me to do down here except make way I shall never accustom myself to electronic gadgetry, nor to I look on that world of yesteryear without resentment, nor regret quite simply, it no longer exists for me, at least, since it continues, without any bother or fuss, in a universe that is a littlebrutal, a littledoomed, and in which the average level of virtues and vice must have remainedor less constant It is merely that its ways are no longer mine there s nothing left for me to do down here except make way I shall never accustom myself to electronic gadgetry, nor to living in a country whose fate is being determined six thousand kilometers from where I live Everything sets one s teeth on edge in this world where it is always rush hour and where children want to be EinsteinsThroughout History, Venice has shown two faces sometimes a pond, sometimes the open sea, one moment peddling lethargy in bookshop windows, the next exploding into a far flung imperialismThat black little canal at the far end, at the very top of the perspective, there is a house of a dull red colour as the sun goes down, its beams suddenly alight on the fa ade and illuminate it just as one lights a candle.Water lends a depth to the sounds, a silky retentiveness that can last for over a minute it is as if one was sinking into the depths.This reader, having but a fraction of Morand s education and none of his worldly experience, can only half comprehend the splendour that gilds his prose, but even if understood only in part, it fully fascinates The writing reflects the author cultured, elegant in thought, musing but not rambling, exhibiting a control that is not imposed but learned, permeating This book is part sketch of a place and part autobiography Moving from a dignified past to the years of World War Two to finally face an unexpected and uncertain present, details Venice not just as a place, but as an experience His observations of the city unfold in sensory, personal, aesthetic, and historical dimensions, and attesting to the cultivated mind behind their conception, there are no strict boundaries between these types of reflections The memory of witnessing the auctioning of an art collection April 1964, Crazy Bidding provokes a Proust quotation, the history of the Palazzo Labia, the venue of the auction, appears casually, and, between the suggested disconnection between art and the market or rather, the incomprehension that these two wildly different concepts would ever meet, and that they do, any hope of reassuring reconciliation lurks something like sadnessBeneath M.R s ivory hammer, an entire art lover s world would vanish artefacts have no master Only the Tiepolos would remain, their fate bound to that of the walls of the empty building Above them was the throng of goddesses, painted as permanent frescoes, and who were now mistresses of a deserted Palazzo Labia, laughing for all eternity, like the Rhinemaidens Detached from their supports, in whose arms would these beautiful women now lie Where would these Bacchuses parade their drunkenness, or these Ceres their harvests The dignity of this passage belongs to the lament Although Morand at other instances is quick to assume indifference, that loss seeps through It leaves one wondering whether such insouciance is dignified concealment which is probably the best

  2. says:

    Morand raconte ses Venises Il narre plusieurs pisodes de son existence plus ou moins li s Venise et aux visites ou s jours qu il y fit.Le r cit est truff d anecdotes historiques et souvent passionnantes tant sur la ville que sur ses mondanit s dont Morand tait particuli rement friand.Malheureusement, certaines histoires font trop de r f rences un monde perdu et des c l brit s aujourd hui inconnues ce qui nuit parfois l int r t du r cit.Une vision litt raire qui reste toutefois passio Morand raconte ses Venises Il narre plusieurs pisodes de son existence plus ou moins li s Venise et aux visites ou s jours qu il y fit.Le r cit est truff d anecdotes historiques et souvent passionnantes tant sur la ville que sur ses mondanit s dont Morand tait particuli rement friand.Malheureusement, certaines histoires font trop de r f rences un monde perdu et des c l brit s aujourd hui inconnues ce qui nuit parfois l int r t du r cit.Une vision litt raire qui reste toutefois passionnante sur une poque et une ville qui reste ternelle

  3. says:

    Almost like Sebald in his depth and pursuit of knowledge At times a little old fashioned, still has some exquisite scenes.

  4. says:

    Une l gie brillante et r actionnaire Venise.

  5. says:

    Finished this applauding in my head What a wonderful read Paul Morand is now holding a place on my short list of people I d happily be stranded on a deserted island with invite to dinner, living or dead whose books I d rescue from the burning libraryand on Morand is a knowing romantic He grasps where his romanticism comes from and where it led him Venice as the thread of his life is a perfect anchor for the roaming, romantic soul Naive and foolish, it never occurred to me that we hav Finished this applauding in my head What a wonderful read Paul Morand is now holding a place on my short list of people I d happily be stranded on a deserted island with invite to dinner, living or dead whose books I d rescue from the burning libraryand on Morand is a knowing romantic He grasps where his romanticism comes from and where it led him Venice as the thread of his life is a perfect anchor for the roaming, romantic soul Naive and foolish, it never occurred to me that we have duties toward Beauty p.33 I have never learnt grammar it s nothing to be proud of, but it seems to me that if I were to learn it today, I should no longer be able to write my eye and my ear were my only teachers, the eye especially Good writing is the opposite of writing well p 11 Well brought up people do not swearI immediately make up a list of all the swear words I can remember p.155

  6. says:

    Cr tica pendente

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