Lupercal



❰Reading❯ ➾ Lupercal Author Ted Hughes – E17streets4all.co.uk The authors second collection which prints some of his most revered work including Pike, Hawk Roosting and November The authors second collection which prints some of his most revered work including Pike, Hawk Roosting and November.Lupercal

Edward James Hughes was an English poet and children s writer, known as Ted Hughes His most characteristic verse is without sentimentality, emphasizing the cunning and savagery of animal life in harsh, sometimes disjunctive linesThe dialect of Hughes s native West Riding area of Yorkshire set the tone of his verse At Pembroke College, Cambridge, he found folklore and anthropology of particular interest, a concern that was reflected in a number of his poems In he married the American poet Sylvia Plath The couple made a visit to the United States in , the year that his first volume of verse, The Hawk in the Rain , was published Other works soon followed Hughes stopped writing poetry almost completely for almost three years following Plath s suicide in the couple had separated earlier , but thereafter he published prolifically, often in collaboration with photographers and illustrators, as in Under the North Star He wrote many volumes for children, including Remains of Elmet , in which he recalled the world of his childhood From he was co editor of the magazine Modern Poetry in Translation in London Some of Hughes s essays on subjects of literary and cultural criticism were published as Winter Pollen After decades of silence on the subject of his marriage to Plath, Hughes addressed it in the poems of Birthday Letters In he was appointed Britain s poet laureateTed Hughes was the father of Frieda Hughes and the brother of Gerald Hughes.

Paperback  Ê Lupercal PDF/EPUB ò
  • Paperback
  • 63 pages
  • Lupercal
  • Ted Hughes
  • English
  • 22 March 2018
  • 0571092462

10 thoughts on “Lupercal

  1. says:

    I honestly feel bad for giving it such a low rating The thing is that I just couldn t understand what he wanted to say I felt utterly lost Also, I struggled with the vocabulary But this wasn t the reason why I didn t like it and I trully wanted to like it You see, when I am reading poetry I want the poet to shake me to speak to me I don t fancy just well written poems,I want to feeland unfortunately, and it pains me to say it, Ted Hughes didn t manage to do so Mind that this is just I honestly feel bad for giving it such a low rating The thing is that I just couldn t understand what he wanted to say I felt utterly lost Also, I struggled with the vocabulary But this wasn t the reason why I didn t like it and I trully wanted to like it You see, when I am reading poetry I want the poet to shake me to speak to me I don t fancy just well written poems,I want to feeland unfortunately, and it pains me to say it, Ted Hughes didn t manage to do so Mind that this is just my personal opinion and I by no means underestimate Hughes s talent He just wasn t for me Nevertheless, I still am looking forward to reading the Birthday Letters

  2. says:

    Ted Hughes is not an easy read This is especially true if you don t want to stop and research those things you do not understand in a text I found myself stopping to look up Greek gods and 16th century poets to make sure I was comprehending the context However, once you do the work, there is so much to appreciate about Lupercal Hughes is able to bridge the centuries, nature, mythology and the Cold War all into one book This book was published in 1960 and is not confessional if that is what Ted Hughes is not an easy read This is especially true if you don t want to stop and research those things you do not understand in a text I found myself stopping to look up Greek gods and 16th century poets to make sure I was comprehending the context However, once you do the work, there is so much to appreciate about Lupercal Hughes is able to bridge the centuries, nature, mythology and the Cold War all into one book This book was published in 1960 and is not confessional if that is what you are looking for Hughes is interested in big ideas and how these ideas all come together His love of nature and myth are truly the highlights of this book Two of my favorite poems in this collection are Nicholas Ferrer and The Perfect Forms While this book is dedicated to his wife at the time, Sylvia Plath, and she probably typed the manuscript for him, don t expect to find endless love poems or revealing anecdotes about their life together Read this book because it is good and solid, not because of Hughes private life

  3. says:

    Hughes poetry really is like a spell Hear him reading some of his poetry and you d think he was summoning some moss and twig covered spirits I prefer Crow to this But perhaps I m ignorant of somethingspecial here His writing from the perspective of a hawk in hawk roosting is so powerful, the hawk becomes something godly If I could write something that moved readers to anything near where Hughes does me to place beyond the simple romantic view of nature, to a world of myth, where Hughes poetry really is like a spell Hear him reading some of his poetry and you d think he was summoning some moss and twig covered spirits I prefer Crow to this But perhaps I m ignorant of somethingspecial here His writing from the perspective of a hawk in hawk roosting is so powerful, the hawk becomes something godly If I could write something that moved readers to anything near where Hughes does me to place beyond the simple romantic view of nature, to a world of myth, where you feel like a child in his hands, I would be a happy little amateur poet

  4. says:

    Poets like Ted Hughes make the rest of us feel and seem inadequate He is a master with words Witches , Of Cats and Historian being my favourites in this collection of poems He paints so precisely the images he wants you to see, and places his punctuation just so, so that reading about the acrobats soaring and the tense audience watching them, you become out of breath and tense yourself He is a wonder and I enjoy reading him immensely Did that sound pretentious My bad.

  5. says:

    I found some of these poems rather self consciously poetic, and some I just could not see what he meant but his writing is so strong, The Bull Moses, and View of a Pig, so real and vivid, this is an early collection but clearly the work of a Real Poet.

  6. says:

    Pike makes this entire book worthwhile The rest of the book, though, doesn t disappoint.

  7. says:

    When I sat down to write about my first reading of this collection of poetry, I drew a blank I knew nothing of Ted Hughes until he was mentioned in a comment about my reading of T.S Eliot s The Waste Land, along with Sylvia Plath I d heard of Plath I didn t hate the poetry, nor did I like it But it seemed strange I knew it was about animals, but that was the extent of the experience of my first reading So I took to some research and made some enlightening discoveries.Hughes was the UK s P When I sat down to write about my first reading of this collection of poetry, I drew a blank I knew nothing of Ted Hughes until he was mentioned in a comment about my reading of T.S Eliot s The Waste Land, along with Sylvia Plath I d heard of Plath I didn t hate the poetry, nor did I like it But it seemed strange I knew it was about animals, but that was the extent of the experience of my first reading So I took to some research and made some enlightening discoveries.Hughes was the UK s Poet Laureate, just like Alfred, Lord Tennyson There had to be something I was missing.In an interview with The Paris Review from 1995, Hughes mentions a number of issues concerning The Art of Poetry , such as the differences in drafting verse in handwriting versus typing In response to the question Is a poem ever finished , Hughes mentions a struggle he has had with the singular or plural in the middle of the poem, Hawk Roosting Neither worked satisfactorily.So I start there My feet are locked upon the rough bark.It took the whole of CreationTo produce my foot, my each feather Now I hold Creation in my footAnd he s right Swap feet for foot and back again, and neither works grammatically But it works as it is in the poem.I tried another poem, Urn Burial On the first reading, my mind was clouded by seeing some of the oldest remnants of human urn burials in Bahrain on a visit during my sabbatical in 2009 All I could picture were the skeletal remains curled up in the large stone urns No animals in sight.Then, like a 3D picture, the symbolism became clear Oh, it s a weasel It even reads weasel , but I was off in another dimension It started to make sense.This was not entirely my own doing I had to digress with Hughes ars poetica, The Thought Fox Hughes basically tells me how to read his poetry It s very clever, but maybe a littleacademic than I was expecting.Hughes fascination with animals came from his childhood experience His older brother, ten years his senior, loved to hunt Hughes acted as his older brother s retriever and this continued for something like twenty years Hughes is also famous for his children s books.Like many readers these days, I had fallen victim to the general decline in reading poetry for fun Except epic and didactic poetry such as Homer, Virgil, and Hesiod This year I have read Frank O Hara, Sir Walter Ralegh, T.S Eliot, and Alfred Lord Tennyson, and I am now a convert I also read Nietzsche s The Gay Science and I am currently reading Harold Bloom s The Anxiety of Influence, both works about poetry It makessense to read poetrythan once, and with some study in between Hughes said this in his Paris Review interview, too Had I not read up about Hughes, I would have been none the wiser And I would certainly be missing out.The icing on the cake was the name of the collection, Lupercal, is derived from an ancient Roman pastoral or fertility festival, Lupercalia, held annually on my birthday This madesense of the numerous classical references that had confused me in my first reading.Perhaps I am now a Ted Hughes fan

  8. says:

    4.5 stars Resplendent nature poetry hinting at Hughes obsession with obsessed women CLEOPATRA TO THE ASPThe bright mirror I braved the devil in itLoved me like my soul, my soul Now that I seek myself in a serpentMy smile is fatal.Nile moves in me my thighs splayInto the squalled Mediterranean My brain hides in that AbyssiniaLost armies foundered towards.Desert and river unwrinkle again.Seeming to bring them the waters that make drunkCaesar, Pompey, Antony I drank.Now let the snake reign.A ha 4.5 stars Resplendent nature poetry hinting at Hughes obsession with obsessed women CLEOPATRA TO THE ASPThe bright mirror I braved the devil in itLoved me like my soul, my soul Now that I seek myself in a serpentMy smile is fatal.Nile moves in me my thighs splayInto the squalled Mediterranean My brain hides in that AbyssiniaLost armies foundered towards.Desert and river unwrinkle again.Seeming to bring them the waters that make drunkCaesar, Pompey, Antony I drank.Now let the snake reign.A half deity out of Capricorn,This rigid Augustus mountsWith his sword virginal indeed and has shornSummarily the moon horned riverFrom my bed May the moonRuin him with virginity Drink me, now, wholeWith coiled Egypt s past then from my deltaSwim like a fish toward Rome Ted Hughes, LupercalWelcome addition to any poetry collection

  9. says:

    This is the first collection of poetry I have read, but I really enjoyed this Ted Hughes writes accessible poetry that commands your attention The poems on animals and English countryside were particularly good Recommended by someone new to poetry

  10. says:

    I didn t expect to give this book five stars while reading it After I finished it I had to It expands my idea of what poetry can do And that s the best thing, really.

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