Knights of the Hawk



➿ Knights of the Hawk Free ➶ Author James Aitcheson – E17streets4all.co.uk The third novel in the compelling Conquest series The Bloody Aftermath from the author of Sworn Sword Perfect for fans of Ben KaneTUMN, The struggle for England has been long and brutal Now, however The third novel in the compelling Conquest seriesThe Bloody Aftermath from the author of Sworn Sword Perfect for fans of Ben KaneTUMN,The struggle for England has been long and brutal Now, however, five years after the fateful Battle of Hastings, only a determined band of Knights of PDF/EPUB ² rebels in the Fens stand between King William and absolute conquestTancred, a proud and ambitious knight, is among the Normans marching to crush them Once lauded for his exploits, his fame is now fading Embittered by his dwindling fortunes and by the oath shackling him to his lord, he yearns for the chance to win back his reputation through spilling enemy bloodBut as the Normans attempts to assault the rebels island stronghold meet with failure, the King grows increasingly desperate With morale in camp failing, and the prospect of victory seeming ever distant, Tancred s loyalty is put to the test as never before.Knights of the Hawk

James Aitcheson was born in Wiltshire in and studied History at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he developed an interest in the Middle Ages, and in Anglo Saxon England and the Norman Conquest in particularHis debut novel, Sworn Sword, featuring the knight Tancred and set Knights of PDF/EPUB ² in the aftermath of the Battle of Hastings, was published in The first volume in the Conquest Series, it has since been followed by two sequels The Splintered Kingdom and Knights of the Hawk The Harrowing, James s fourth novel, was published by Quercus in July and named by The Times as a Book of the Monthjamesaitcheson.

Knights of the Hawk PDF è Knights of  PDF/EPUB ²
    If you re looking for a CBR and CBZ reader attempts to assault the rebels island stronghold meet with failure, the King grows increasingly desperate With morale in camp failing, and the prospect of victory seeming ever distant, Tancred s loyalty is put to the test as never before."/>
  • ebook
  • 448 pages
  • Knights of the Hawk
  • James Aitcheson
  • English
  • 27 November 2017
  • 1409052311

10 thoughts on “Knights of the Hawk

  1. says:

    Being English, I see Hastings from the English side We were invaded They came from Normandy They won, we lost Later, we fought back And lost again I know of course, about how badly we were later treated by them Think Robin Hood It s taken for granted that the Normans are the bad guys One dimensional bad guys at that Until I read James Aitcheson s Sworn Sword , I hadn t actually considered that there might actually be a Norman side to 1066 and all that Which was why, to me at le Being English, I see Hastings from the English side We were invaded They came from Normandy They won, we lost Later, we fought back And lost again I know of course, about how badly we were later treated by them Think Robin Hood It s taken for granted that the Normans are the bad guys One dimensional bad guys at that Until I read James Aitcheson s Sworn Sword , I hadn t actually considered that there might actually be a Norman side to 1066 and all that Which was why, to me at least, Sworn Sword came as such a fresh, wonderful, confusing surprise Suddenly here was I, an Englishman, rooting for Tancred Dinant, one of them A horrid Norman.After reading Knights of the Hawk , over a couple of days, though ator less one sitting, I can safely say that the freshness, the surprise and the satisfaction, are all still there And then some Expertly written, with passion and verve, Knights of the Hawk is by far the best book I will read all year Five of Goodreads finest stars Straight out No doubt No other conclusion possible.Expertly weaving his way in and out of what little we know of the history of this period as Tancred says the seasons turn and the years and the decades pass, the stories grow ever wilder, and the myths growpowerful than the truth James Aitcheson has created a novel a series of novels now brim filled with the energy, with the sights and sounds and not least the smells, of daily life and death on and away from the battlefields of the new Norman Britain Compelling and gripping and packed with nerve tingling, nail biting action, Knights of the Hawk is a story that really could have happened, but one I now think only James could have written.It is five years since the slaughter at Hastings and the English resistance still hasn t been extinguished The Norman invasion of Britain is bogged down, literally, in and around the English rebels stronghold at Ely Something needs to be done to rescue the conquest and someone needs to do it Now Step forward Tancred Dinant A Norman knight who came over with William, who fought at Hastings and who ruled lands in the west of England as vassal to his sworn lord, Robert Malet But who has, despite saving the day on frequent occasions in the years since Hastings, fallen somewhat in the esteem and pecking order amongst his fellow Normans He can t understand why he is reduced to this escort duty , guarding supply wagons, instead of being richly rewarded for his efforts in securing the England for King William Wealth and fame, battle honours and leadership, look to be passing him by While he could be forgiven for giving up and going home, he s still the only one who actually delivers the goods and gets the Normans into Ely.Then, when they ve achieved what they set out to do, reached a point where they might have expected to be able to sit back and enjoy the fruits of all their labours, it starts to unravel for Tancred He has go against his sworn lord and he suddenly finds enemies where he thought he had friends Hell, as a Norman, you must realise you re in trouble when you realise you identify with the English leader who stood between you and all you thought you ever wanted Hereward He and I weresimilar than I d realised We both strove for recognition for our deeds, and struggled against the weighty oaths that bound us Both of us had at one time led whole armies into the field, yet now found ourselves in somewhat humbler circumstances, lacking the respect we craved and which for a while at least we had commanded However, as we find out later, by removing Hereward for the Normans, Tancred has in fact removed the obstacle stopping him from getting on with living his own life.That s just the first part of the story, as the book can be said to divide itself into two parts The first, is in line with what we know of the early years of the conquest The character of Tancred is James invention, but the events the books have described and the five years it took before William had anything that passed for total control over his newly conquered kingdom, the treachery, the back stabbing, the rebellions at Ely led by Hereward, all happened Exactly what happened, we don t know But I ll go for James version if it comes to a vote.The second half of the book moves away from inserting Tancred into known events, and we sail literally off into the unknown Into Tancred s own, self determined future He has to leave, to find himself He has lost his faith in the Norman system, so he must find someone from his past, who can give him a future he can believe in He has been a part of the Norman war machine, he must now go in search of who he, Tancred, really is The Breton had become a Norman, had become bound to England By freeing himself, Tancred realises it can be he who decides who he is and what path his own future should take.It is of course, the character of Tancred that carries the book We ve a reasonable idea of his character from previous novels, but through the course of Knights of the Hawk , he fills out He s always been adaptable, resourceful and believable, now he s a muchnuanced and fully rounded character Actually, he s got the decency you normally associate with being English But Tancred is sometimes too decent, not devious enough, too trusting to imagine for instance, someone might be laying a trap for him Friend or foe As the book progresses, Tancred adapts I won t say he learns , but he becomesaware of other possibilities than the one he has rushed headlong into He is a Knight, an honourable one at that, but this belief in his own honour and trustworthiness, as proved time and time again in the most desperate of circumstances, sometimes blinds him That his fellow Normans might see his honourable actions in a different way, in a maybecynical way and use his trustworthiness against him, that s what he doesn t see at first And it causes frustration, which leads to rashness which leads to murder and exile Not just from a land and friends also an ideal Of honour Leaving all he knew behind and seemingly having his options reduced, as it were, actually helps him become acomplex character Knights of the Hawk begins stealthily, but like a hunting party in the midst of the mists and marshes of Ely, it creeps up and ambushes you Rich with compelling dialogue and vigorously peppered with heart stopping action, desperate feats of derring do, incident and intrigue, this is a book that keeps you on your toes at all times Not least with the unexpected alliances that pop up Unexpectedly The tension, the suspense and the don t dare breathe even though you re just reading the book, in case you give Tancred away those sequences are astoundingly well handled There are highs and lows and heartbreaks, great tragedy and blinking away the tears optimism There is so much to remember this book for, but for now the way James draws out a scene, twisting the tension level up and up and leading to the final delivery of the outcome while you re trying not to break the tension and flick a look at the last lines to see how the paragraph ends is what I will perhaps remember perhaps the most from this novel If you re going to say you devour a book, then this is delicious Oh, and an ending that is well, you ll have to read it, wipe your eyes and trust that Tancred is back soon.This novel has really showcased what a really fine new, young writer we have on the Historical Fiction battle field, in James Aitcheson It surely won t be long before we re comparing people like Bernard Cornwell and Conn Iggulden, to James There is a maturity and confidence to his writing, that if you d said this was James 20th book, you d believe it The surprising thing is, Knights of the Hawk is just James third outing we really are spoiled to still have so much to look forward to from him.And we learned that 11th Century Welshmen liked cleaning their teeth A lot

  2. says:

    Knights of The Hawk is the third book following the adventures of the Norman Knight Tancred I keep wanting to like thison its own merit, but I can not help but compare him to Uthred from the Cornwall Saxon Tales Same issues with lords, same doing stupid shit to get in trouble with the aforementioned lords and then some wild adventure concerning some promise to a random girl Sounds familiar It will to any Saxon tales fan Still, originality aside, this is a fun read since it has the set Knights of The Hawk is the third book following the adventures of the Norman Knight Tancred I keep wanting to like thison its own merit, but I can not help but compare him to Uthred from the Cornwall Saxon Tales Same issues with lords, same doing stupid shit to get in trouble with the aforementioned lords and then some wild adventure concerning some promise to a random girl Sounds familiar It will to any Saxon tales fan Still, originality aside, this is a fun read since it has the settings and some of the incidents fairly accurate The story is actually two parts In the first we have Tancred and his conroi of knights duel it out with an uprising There are some interesting historical figures involved including the Morcar and the famous insurgent leader Hereward Hereward fought a great counter campaign during the time of William the Conqueror s Harrowing of the North to subdue it The Harrowing is very similar to the later 1300 s and on concept of chevauch e, wherein crops and villages were destroyed to gain submission via breaking the enemies will This parts ends with the Battle to capture the city of Ely.Then Tancred pisses of some lords, stabs someone and is unjustly IMHO exiled He then goes on a mission to rescue Osywn, his lost love She isn t dead but has been taken by a Viking warlord pirate known as Haakon He s in the Hebrides isles, north of Ireland During this caper he runs into Magnus, a son of Harold former King of England.I ve enjoyed the setting of Norman England during the invasion While the story and writing are good, they don t compare to Cornwell s story The similarities between Uthred and Tancred are hard to ignore and I found myself comparing the two..and Tancred came off the worse for it Still, characters aside, this is a good read and a fun way to be introduced to the England of the post invasion Norman rule So a fun historical fiction read, just nothing amazing in the storytelling

  3. says:

    The first two books showed a lot of promise, but they had their bugs However, even there it was obvious that the trend was aiming towards something memorable I am glad to say that it happened here This book can finally be compared to stories told by Bernard Cornwell Cannot wait for the next book in the series The first two books showed a lot of promise, but they had their bugs However, even there it was obvious that the trend was aiming towards something memorable I am glad to say that it happened here This book can finally be compared to stories told by Bernard Cornwell Cannot wait for the next book in the series

  4. says:

    3.5 It is difficult to read a very well written story when you dislike the MC.

  5. says:

    Battle books comes in all shapes and sizes there are the shooty stabby thank you to outstanding ECW author, Mike Arnold, for that phrase books of the civil war and on, of which Robert Wilton s Treason s Tide is one of the most outstanding, and then there are the FFF fighting, fornicating and passing wind, in the censored version Roman dark age books that pit Boy s Own heroes against impossible odds and they sweep the bad guys heads off with a single twitch of a blade six inches long, prov Battle books comes in all shapes and sizes there are the shooty stabby thank you to outstanding ECW author, Mike Arnold, for that phrase books of the civil war and on, of which Robert Wilton s Treason s Tide is one of the most outstanding, and then there are the FFF fighting, fornicating and passing wind, in the censored version Roman dark age books that pit Boy s Own heroes against impossible odds and they sweep the bad guys heads off with a single twitch of a blade six inches long, proving that it s not what size it is, it s what you do with it in your dreams that counts.And then there are the good, solid, well researched, battle fests with solidly rounded characters and a strong narrative drive think Ben Kane, Tony Riches, Harry Sidebottom, Simon Scarrow and James Aitcheson, who s latest book, KNIGHTS OF THE HAWK, has recently launched Set in 1071, this continues the story of Tancred a Dinant, a Breton knight of the invading, occupying Norman force that is slowly trying to bring England to heel Tancred is increasingly his own man, setting himself at odds with the king and his lord and against the rebel Hereward, whose death forms one of the by plots in a novel that sees Tancred breaking free of his political bonds and following his heart to its logical and tragic destination.Nobody else is even endeavouring to explore this era James Aitcheson has it all to himself and he s taken the bad guys the enemy, the people we all fought against in our inner imaginings of Hastings and beyond and has made them the good guys Well, some of them are good Some of the time.It s a great achievement when we can root for people we ve loathed since childhood and we do What higher praise can there be Well written, brilliantly researched it does help to be a proper historian not all historians can write fiction, but when they can, it s fantastic , and fast furious blood filled manic Perfect And I love the cover

  6. says:

    Great story, and I enjoyed it quite a bit, as I did the first two books of the series This one had a bitgrit to it, and was a bitintense I felt than the first two books Tancred is a very believable and likable character, as are the other supporting characters of the story Altogether, James Aitcheson has crafted a very interesting story full of excitement, adventure, victory, and loss, and painted a detailed picture of what life on the sword path was like in that time.

  7. says:

    It s fascinating, sometimes, to step behind a story and into the intentions of the writer Now, James Aitcheson is a skilled writer and this is an excellent book it fully deserves the glowing reviews it has received onand Good Reads and elsewhere So let s just take those reviews as read, and move into the swampy mire that is the mind of the writer at work.Now, I thought I had this book worked out Laconic hero from the Norman side although a Breton so, I suppose, a double enemy of t It s fascinating, sometimes, to step behind a story and into the intentions of the writer Now, James Aitcheson is a skilled writer and this is an excellent book it fully deserves the glowing reviews it has received onand Good Reads and elsewhere So let s just take those reviews as read, and move into the swampy mire that is the mind of the writer at work.Now, I thought I had this book worked out Laconic hero from the Norman side although a Breton so, I suppose, a double enemy of the Anglo Saxons faces English folk hero in Hereward, who proves to be as ruthless and determined a killer as, well, William Nice set up of Hereward as the adversary, the assault on the Isle of Ely, Hereward s escape around the half way point of the book, and I m expecting it all to continue through further encounters and skirmishes until a final denouement 150 pages later.Only, it doesn t James does a story swerve on the reader, and completely dumps his expectations in the fen fastness into which Hereward s legend disappears.That s when I started thinking about what James is doing here and in the previous books about Tancred, and I kept on thinking, following trails and suggestions, through to the end of the book There s a clue, I think, in the title of the first Sworn Sword Many of the warrior societies of the early and high Middle Ages were held together by oaths, by the pledging of service and loyalty and arms through the giving of word upon the sacred With limited recourse to law or recompense from human society, a surer, although post mortem sanction was required to hold men in check, and the giving of oaths before and to God provided that, for failure to uphold an oath meant sure and eternal punishment in the afterlife Or did it That is what James Aitcheson is doing in these novels, I think He is working through the implications and understandings of an oath bound society, using his hero to investigate the consequences of this within an imaginative recreation of a historical society And it s quite, quite fascinating.Knights of the Hawk ends with Tancred largely cut free from his previous oaths and obligations, to kings and lords and even the woman he had loved Now, it will be fascinating to see where James takes the story, for both literally and metaphorically, Tancred ends the story at sea and the sea can take you anywhere

  8. says:

    James Aitcheson has now written several successful books about the Norman Conquest This one about Hereward the Wake makes a useful contrast to James Wild s novel, Hereward Wild told his story from the point of view of Hereward Aitcheson tells the story from the point of view of the fictional Tancred of Earnford an equally fictional village in Shropshire Tancred is a Breton who came across the channel as one of William the Conqueror s knights.The campaign against Hereward and the other rebels James Aitcheson has now written several successful books about the Norman Conquest This one about Hereward the Wake makes a useful contrast to James Wild s novel, Hereward Wild told his story from the point of view of Hereward Aitcheson tells the story from the point of view of the fictional Tancred of Earnford an equally fictional village in Shropshire Tancred is a Breton who came across the channel as one of William the Conqueror s knights.The campaign against Hereward and the other rebels at Ely is explained quite well Some is speculative all shows sign that he has researched the topic including visiting Cambridgeshire and Lincolnshire to work out how the story would have played out.However, this part of the novel is completed well within the firat half of the novel leaving room for Aitcheson to develop themes introduced in earlier novels in this series, namely the rescue of Tancred s lover Oswynn and the avenging of the death at Dunholm of Tancred s feudal lord, Robert de Commines by Haakon Thorolfsson Fortunately Haakon is responsible for both the death of Robert and the abduction of Oswynn, so it is just a matter of finding Haakon.Much of the events in the novel are totally fiction Within the historical record, Tancred plays the role we see so often in historical fiction, the unsung hero who helps the king plan his strategy, who is there at the crucial moments ensuring that history is fulfilled It is Tancred who plans and carries out the plotting with Morcar, for Morcar to turn from supporting Hereward and throw in his lot with William.The novel appears to be historically accurate, including the fact that Dublin at that time was a major centre for the slave trade but did slavers also deal in African slaves at that time I particularly liked Aitcheson s prose style There was no concession to the weaker reader with short words and even shorter sentences His descriptions of the landscape and the hurly burly of battle were both compelling reading, particularly the parallel phrasing And so we sat cross legged, huddled in our cloaks beneath the stars, and watched our cooking fires dwindle, while we recounted stories of battles past, of women we had known, of the marvels we had seen on our travels, of things that had happened when we were young and still in training, of fine weapons and horses, of sword brothers long since fallen, of the various dreams and desires to which we all still clung, and we revelled as much in the listening as in the telling Tancred tells the story in the first person which goes some way to making him a sympathetic character We share in his uncertainties in his moments of doubt and fear so he seems quite human and for all that he is a professional soldier a likeable person.The title is a bit of a poser as it is not clear why Tancred and his two knights along with his two friends are the Knights of the Hawk It is not their standard so perhaps it is to describe their behaviour as raptors preying on the English churls Yet Tancred sees himself as a knight bound by the rules of chivalry and his oaths of loyalty to his lord and to the king He is not a nasty brutish bully saving his use of force for his opponents in a fair fight I can only assume the title is there as a marketing device.Aitcheson is a capable writer I would willingly read his other novels about the Norman Conquest and its aftermath

  9. says:

    Minor spoilers This book concludes the Conquest trilogy The stories cover the years in England immediately following the Norman s victory at the Battle of Hastings They focus on Tancred, a Breton, who is frequently in the forefront of the battles against English rebels Knights of the Hawk is split into two events The first covers the siege of the Ilse of Ely in modern day Cambridgeshire The Ilse was held by English rebels, led by Earl Morcar and Hereward the Wake When the story star Minor spoilers This book concludes the Conquest trilogy The stories cover the years in England immediately following the Norman s victory at the Battle of Hastings They focus on Tancred, a Breton, who is frequently in the forefront of the battles against English rebels Knights of the Hawk is split into two events The first covers the siege of the Ilse of Ely in modern day Cambridgeshire The Ilse was held by English rebels, led by Earl Morcar and Hereward the Wake When the story starts the Normans have already made on failed assault of the island They had build a causeway bridge from the marshy fens to the island, but this collapsed under the weight of the knights, leading to many deaths Now a second assault is planned, this time with a new twist, following the capture of Earl Morcar s nephew he met with the King William and for the promise of the restoration of his lands he will switch sides and attack the other rebels once Williams s forces have landed and engaged the defending troops Robert Malet and his soldiers, which include Tancred have been placed at the vanguard and have the dubious honour of leading the Norman s across the newly created pontoon bridge It is a close run thing but King William is eventually victorious and with the subsequent surrender of the remaining English lords finally concludes his conquest of England Things then turn sour for Tancred, he kills a Norman nobleman during a drunken fight at the wake for Lord Robert s father He is immediately dismissed from Robert s service He takes this opportunity to follow up on a piece of intelligence that points the way to his finding the love of his live, Oswyn He travels to Dublin, and thence onto the Hebridean Islands to track done the Danish warlord who now holds her as his property He is entrenched with his Iron Fortress and believes himself and his castle to be safe from assault Can Tancred and the rag tag band of soldiers he has manage to acquire successfully attack the castle and win Overall I ve thoroughly enjoyed the series detailed a period of history I had little knowledge over The series ends with the ultimate future of Tancred left somewhat in the balance and I for one hope the Aitcheson returns to Tancred in the future to complete the story of his life

  10. says:

    I really enjoyed the three books so far in this series I hesitate to put too much faith in historical fiction, but I think I have a better understanding of the social structure that existed during this time period 1066 AD in England Ireland The main character Tangred is almost a bit too virtuous at some points but that is the only slight issue I have with the books.I read these books out of order and they were OK that way, but it would definitely be preferable to start with Sword Sword and I really enjoyed the three books so far in this series I hesitate to put too much faith in historical fiction, but I think I have a better understanding of the social structure that existed during this time period 1066 AD in England Ireland The main character Tangred is almost a bit too virtuous at some points but that is the only slight issue I have with the books.I read these books out of order and they were OK that way, but it would definitely be preferable to start with Sword Sword and finish with this book for better overall flow

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