The Vagenda: A Zero Tolerance Guide to the Media



❴Read❵ ➪ The Vagenda: A Zero Tolerance Guide to the Media Author Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett – E17streets4all.co.uk HAVE YOU EVER Obsessed over your body s problem areas Killed an hour on the Sidebar of Shame Wondered whether to try Sex Tips to Please Your Man Felt worse after doing any of the above Holly and Rhia HAVE YOU A Zero ePUB ↠ EVER Obsessed over your body s problem areas Killed an hour on the Sidebar of Shame Wondered whether to trySex Tips to Please Your Man Felt worse after doing any of the above Holly and Rhiannon grew up reading glossy mags and, like most women, thought of them as just a bit of fun But over time they started to feel uneasy not just about magazines, but about music videos, page , and women The Vagenda: ePUB Æ being labelled frigid, princesses or trampsSo, following the amazing success of their Vagenda blog, they wrote this book Welcome to your indispensable guide to the madness of women s media.The Vagenda: A Zero Tolerance Guide to the Media

Rhiannon Lucy A Zero ePUB ↠ Cosslett is a columnist, feature writer and editor for The Guardian newspaper In she co founded The Vagenda, a feminist blog which was published in book form by Vintage In Rhiannon was short listed for a press award for young journalist of the year As a freelancer she has written for publications as wide ranging as Elle, Stylist, the New Statesman, The Independent and Time She has extensive radio experience, having appeared The Vagenda: ePUB Æ on Radio s Woman s Hour and the Today programme She was born in Islington, grew up in Wales, spent time living in France and Italy, and has now returned to her birthplace.

The Vagenda: A Zero Tolerance Guide to the Media ePUB
    If you re looking for a CBR and CBZ reader to your indispensable guide to the madness of women s media."/>
  • ebook
  • 304 pages
  • The Vagenda: A Zero Tolerance Guide to the Media
  • Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
  • 15 January 2018
  • 144816172X

10 thoughts on “The Vagenda: A Zero Tolerance Guide to the Media

  1. says:

    My full review is up on Huffington Post of this book so I don t want to replicate it here but I found this book patronising at best, offensive at worst It gives little attention to women who aren t white or straight, it runs down women they don t agree with eg Kim Kardashian, women who like lacy knickers, and plays fast and loose with facts.This book brings nothing new to this subject, which has been covered better before, and in this age, surely the issue for the Vagenda generation is the inte My full review is up on Huffington Post of this book so I don t want to replicate it here but I found this book patronising at best, offensive at worst It gives little attention to women who aren t white or straight, it runs down women they don t agree with eg Kim Kardashian, women who like lacy knickers, and plays fast and loose with facts.This book brings nothing new to this subject, which has been covered better before, and in this age, surely the issue for the Vagenda generation is the internet, not the dwindling circulations of beauty magazines

  2. says:

    It s a rare thing for a book to make me laugh aloud, and fear for the safety sanity of men and women alike.They write like my friends talk, they don t shy away from rude stuff, they swear like real women in the real world swear The conclusion is rightly harrowing The best entertaining but very serious writing on this topic I ve found Will be insisting everyone I know reads it

  3. says:

    I came across Vagenda in the library whilst hunting down Unspeakable Things Sex, Lies and Revolution I opened it and found it so readable and entertaining that I finished it within a day As it is based on a blog which I ve read intermittently , this isn t surprising I wasn t expecting ground breaking feminist theory, as that isn t what the book is for It s a litany of amusingly expressed criticism of women s magazines and their business model of making us feel fat and ugly in order to pu I came across Vagenda in the library whilst hunting down Unspeakable Things Sex, Lies and Revolution I opened it and found it so readable and entertaining that I finished it within a day As it is based on a blog which I ve read intermittently , this isn t surprising I wasn t expecting ground breaking feminist theory, as that isn t what the book is for It s a litany of amusingly expressed criticism of women s magazines and their business model of making us feel fat and ugly in order to push products I used to read such magazines years ago, before I realised that I could find pretty fashion pictures on the internet without advertising Adblock Plus is a wonder or asinine editorialising Despite the deliberately casual tone and detailed mockery uncomfortable underwear gets a lengthy takedown , the underlying points are not ignored There is a certain overlap here with Living Dolls The Return of Sexism, which also decries the way that traditional gender roles and sexual objectification are being sold back to women as empowerment However, that book never quite had the courage to blame capitalism for it Vagenda , by contrast, baldly states All you have to do is look around you to see that capitalist feminism has been a resounding failure Capitalism has never looked kindly upon its underlings, and unfortunately that s what women still are The book ends without any scheme of feminist economics that would deal with this the search continues , but that isn t within its remit Instead, there is a description of the ideal women s magazine, one that treats women as people rather than as ugly dolls in need of fixing Encouragingly, print magazines are going downhill and better online magazines are emerging The underlying issue of commoditised female insecurity remains, though As long as you don t expectthan it promises, a dissection of UK women s magazines and some limited elements of media sexism, this book is a good read I can t say it told me anything really new, but it was an entertainingly written reminder

  4. says:

    The tone is patronising and the view of women and the media they consume narrow It s repetitive and offers nothing new models are airbrushed, editors are influenced by fashion and cosmetics industry PRs, dieting advice is dangerous The book ignores new media completely and looks mostly at Cosmopolitan and other women s monthlies and lad mags like Loaded, making it sound like it was written in the 1990s Something I found particularly problematic was the way the authors criticise Cosmopoli The tone is patronising and the view of women and the media they consume narrow It s repetitive and offers nothing new models are airbrushed, editors are influenced by fashion and cosmetics industry PRs, dieting advice is dangerous The book ignores new media completely and looks mostly at Cosmopolitan and other women s monthlies and lad mags like Loaded, making it sound like it was written in the 1990s Something I found particularly problematic was the way the authors criticise Cosmopolitan s 50 sex tips type of articles with the argument that let s face it, there are only really about 10 sexual moves in existence upholding the same narrow view and control over women s sexuality that they are supposed to be critiquing Needless to say it is very heteronormative lesbianism referred to in one sentence as something you do with your genitals and doesn t really look at representation of race I hate to be so critical of a popular feminist initiative and certainly don t want to see feminist writing restricted to the ivory towers of gender studies departments but we need something better on the market than this

  5. says:

    A good read, an interesting read, often stating the obvious, but sometimes the obvious needs to be stated Sadly it s not offering many solutions to the issues it summarises so well.

  6. says:

    This is a great introduction to feminist issues in the media, and especially in women s magazines At times laugh out loud hilarious, and others sombre and serious, The Vagenda was great to read as a young woman trying to make sense of the shit magazines try to feed us After reading this, I m not sure I ll ever look at magazines the same way I feel weirdly guilty about the collection of Seventeen magazines under my bed, and my recent Victoria s Secret haul I simultaneously feeleducated This is a great introduction to feminist issues in the media, and especially in women s magazines At times laugh out loud hilarious, and others sombre and serious, The Vagenda was great to read as a young woman trying to make sense of the shit magazines try to feed us After reading this, I m not sure I ll ever look at magazines the same way I feel weirdly guilty about the collection of Seventeen magazines under my bed, and my recent Victoria s Secret haul I simultaneously feeleducated about the issues present, and better for reading this book It usually takes an open minded approach although the attitudes to women only enjoying gentle, vanilla sex seemed to prevail until the last chapter, which was a bit better and mostly made me feel better about myself The conclusion was a hopeful one, which I liked, but some of the dieting sections, especially relating to fat women getting paid less in jobs made me hate my own skin Still, a nice read as an intro to the topics raised I checked out the blog, too, having only heard of it from the book, and I like it.Four stars

  7. says:

    This book was entertaining and informative but I admit theI read the less the rating I was contemplating being generous with, became.To combat girls being looked down upon by morally loose men let us become Morally loose our selfs.I mean what else is a sentence like this supposed to inspire Perhaps it s time to stop using the word slut altogether, because if we want women to make their own sexual choices without fear of society s judgement, then the word shouldn t really exist at This book was entertaining and informative but I admit theI read the less the rating I was contemplating being generous with, became.To combat girls being looked down upon by morally loose men let us become Morally loose our selfs.I mean what else is a sentence like this supposed to inspire Perhaps it s time to stop using the word slut altogether, because if we want women to make their own sexual choices without fear of society s judgement, then the word shouldn t really exist at all REALLY I can t evenInstead, here s a thought why not make men feel ashamed of their loose morals by actually having standards and integrity Because at the end of the day an average 25yo woman has no respect for a player not even these players want their daughters to end up with players and why in the world would I want myself to emulate something or someone I don t highly regard

  8. says:

    I give this 4 s because I think it would be great for young adults It s pretty hilarious in places and some of it was still shocking to me the extent of the rape normalisation in university publications for instance It was as someone else said quite young I don t see that as a bad thing I m in my 30s and still got something out of it but would say it s a great book to buy a teen or someone in their 20s if they re new to this kind of thing.

  9. says:

    I have to be honest, I think this book suffers for the fact that I read it straight after Laura Bates Everyday Sexism Whilst Everyday Sexism was a hard hitting read, examining sexism from street harassment, through workplace discrimination, media impact, women in the professional world, and , with Bates supporting her arguments with referenced facts and copious reports made to the Everyday Sexism Project, The Vagenda felt like it suffered in comparison, making a few unsupported statements I have to be honest, I think this book suffers for the fact that I read it straight after Laura Bates Everyday Sexism Whilst Everyday Sexism was a hard hitting read, examining sexism from street harassment, through workplace discrimination, media impact, women in the professional world, and , with Bates supporting her arguments with referenced facts and copious reports made to the Everyday Sexism Project, The Vagenda felt like it suffered in comparison, making a few unsupported statements and, surprisingly, failing to utilise the many contributors to the website Whilst Everyday Sexism has media influence as one of its chapters in which it examines the presence of sexism in media and influence of media on sexism, amidst a much wider serious discussion about sexism in many different areas of society, The Vagenda does it the other way around, the main focus of the book being on how consumerism in the media has promoted sexism, with a conclusion briefly touching on the wider societal implications Simply put, it left me wondering how many times I needed to read about how pointless magazine articles ruthlessly denigrating a celebrity s appearance are, when Bates chapter on the same topic achieved the same effect of highlighting this noxious blend of sexism and consumerism muchsuccinctly The Vagenda is also written in a chatty style that didn t work for me Everyday Sexism s serious tone helped make the impact of the information it was trying to get across, whilst reading The Vagenda I wondered when the authors were going to get down to the point and match its tone to the seriousness of the issues the subtitle of the book is, after all, The zero tolerance guide to the media , which rather implied some hard hitting discussion within I found myself agreeing with some of the sentiments within, but felt that the jokey tone detracted from taking it seriously Others have pointed out that The Vagenda lacks any sort of double discrimination discussion about the challenges faced by those who are not only women but non Caucasian, disabled, bi or homosexual, and transgender Everyday Sexism includes such a discussion, with the admission that it can only scratch the surface of such issues whereas The Vagenda appears lacking in its failure to touch on the topic.I also had a slightly bizarre experience with the book In the introduction, the authors describe howwe had consumed an awful lot of glossy trash over the years glossy trash that had been telling us how to look, think and behave since we first left the local newsagent s clutching a copy of Mizz in our sweaty little sherbet covered fingers As tweenagers, we graduated from the romance comics, spooky stories and I kissed a boy during my first period, am I pregnant problem pages in Shout, Mizz, Sugar or Jackie, dependent on your age, to those with amature demographic such as Just Seventeen later rebranded as J 17 For our own generation, J 17 which everyone knows you read when you were 13 and hid from your scandalised mother, lest she find the bit about 69ing was the go to magazine for sex advice, trading as it did primarily in information and revelations about boys in the same way that Jackie traded in romance and engagement stories in the 1970s But these sorts of stories have a sell by date, and by the time you re a teenager, you re being steered headlong into Cosmopolitan, Company and Grazia An addiction that lasts a lifetime is bornWhy was this bizarre for me I ve never read a magazine and I m the same generation as the authors, incidentally The authors describe a personal experience being hooked into magazines at a young age and progressing toadult versions as part of the process of growing up as a young female, and its clear from reading the book that many women have been through the same experience, to the point where the authors sweepingly address all women in the book, urging our gender to put down the magazines and not to buy into their consumerist crap I seem to be some sort of abnormality a female that wasn t sucked into magazines at a young age and has always been baffled as to why anyone would pick them up in the first place As I read through the authors exhortations and revelations that the magazines are out to make women feel bad about themselves so they will buy the products advertised, I found myself thinking well duh Surely I can t be the only woman who s always thought that such ploys by magazines are transparently obvious and there s absolutely nothing worthwhile within to ever warrant my reading let alone spending money on one of these publications Yet Cosslett and Baxter seem to describe women regularly falling for the nonsense magazines pump out, and then realising, as the authors do at some point during their twenties, that, hang on just a minute, this is all bullshit I m actually rather surprised that I didn t like this bookthan I thought I would Coming off Everyday Sexism I thought The Vagenda would be the perfect follow up, and just a fortnight ago I was chuckling and mentally applauding The Vagenda website for lampooning the ridiculous gossip rag and tabloid celebrity headlines such as Celebrity A flashes cankles during walk to shop eating too much cake and Celebrity B snaps selfie of trim figure what a show off The Vagenda still highlights such ridiculousness here, and rightly so, and for the magazine addicted woman who s never quite been able to figure out her love hate obsession with magazines, the authors point out that their only objective is to take your money through whatever underhanded, body shaming tactics they possibly can But for me the chatty tone detracts from discussing the issues seriously, the authors make a big mistake by not utilising the great resource of contributors to their website, and all in all the book just comes off poorly next to the far better Everyday Sexism, where Laura Bates scrupulous referencing of facts, utilisation of her contributors, succinct chapter on sexism in the media, and serious discussion of almost all the other areas of sexism at least briefly, makes for a compelling, impactful, resonating read that is simply superior I feel bad marking down a book whose authors have goals I basically agree with yes, sexism in magazines is bad, and silly, and people should beaware and stop buying them except, in their conclusion, Cosslett and Baxter don t say people should stop buying magazines which, as another reviewer pointed out, would force magazine editors to sit up and pay attention , they just vaguely outline their ideal world magazine one with women of all shapes and sizes and a distinct lack of body shaming , and encourage women to join other campaigns against sexism Bates Everyday Sexism book actually provides clear advice on how to help in situations of sexist discrimination, what the legal definitions of sexual assault and unfair workplace discrimination are and encourages people to report such occurrences to the police, and share their experiences with others to spread awareness In the acknowledgements, Cosslett and Baxter thank everyone at Elle , who, despite being a women s magazine, were chilled enough to still want to work with us on a brilliant feminist campaign Really Despite blasting Elle, amongst other high profile magazines, the authors endorse them in the acknowledgements One can t help but think that looks odd in a book whose primary purpose is to blast the sexism and consumerism in publications including Elle.5 out of 10

  10. says:

    When I first started this I loved it witty and yet powerful, fact filled yet an easy read It made me think onceabout the power the media hold over us, and how women are portrayed in magazines, adverts and on TV However, the further I got into this book the less I enjoyed it I don t know if that was because the same ground was being covered or if it was because the tone changed in later chapters, becomingsubjective Still, a thought provoking feminist read with a touch of humour When I first started this I loved it witty and yet powerful, fact filled yet an easy read It made me think onceabout the power the media hold over us, and how women are portrayed in magazines, adverts and on TV However, the further I got into this book the less I enjoyed it I don t know if that was because the same ground was being covered or if it was because the tone changed in later chapters, becomingsubjective Still, a thought provoking feminist read with a touch of humour

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