Shadows in the Sun: Healing from Depression and Finding the Light Within



[Read] ➪ Shadows in the Sun: Healing from Depression and Finding the Light Within By Gayathri Ramprasad – E17streets4all.co.uk A first of its kind, cross cultural lens to mental illness through the inspiring story of Gayathri s thirty year battle with depression This literary memoir takes readers from her childhood in India w A the Sun: Healing from ePUB Æ first of its kind, cross the Sun: ePUB ´ cultural lens to mental illness through the inspiring story of Gayathri s thirty year battle with depression This literary memoir takes readers from her childhood in India where depression is thought to be a curse to life in America where she eventually finds the light within by drawing on both her rich Hindu heritage and Western medicine to find Shadows in PDF \ healingAs a young girl in Bangalore, Gayathri was surrounded by the fragrance of jasmine and flickering oil lamps, her family protected by Hindu gods and goddesses But as she grew older, demons came forth from the dark corners of her idyllic kingdom with the scariest creatures lurking within herThe daughter of a respected Brahmin family, Gayathri began to feel different I can hardly eat, sleep, or in the Sun: PDF ☆ think straight The only thing I can do is cry unending tears Her parents insisted it was all in her head Because traditional Indian culture had no concept of depression as an illness, no doctor could diagnose and no medicine could heal her mysterious maladyThis memoir traces Gayathri s courageous battle with the depression that consumed her from adolescence through marriage and a move to the United States It was only after the birth of her first child, when her husband discovered her in the backyard clawing the earth furiously with my bare hands, intent on digging a grave so that I could bury myself alive, that she finally found help After a stay in a psych ward she eventually found the light within, an emotional and spiritual awakening from the darkness of her tortured mindGayathri s inspiring story provides a first of its kind cross cultural view of mental illness how it is regarded in India and in America, and how she drew on both her rich Hindu heritage and Western medicine to find healing.Shadows in the Sun: Healing from Depression and Finding the Light Within

Gayathri the Sun: Healing from ePUB Æ Ramprasad is the Founder and the Sun: ePUB ´ President of ASHA International myasha a non profit organization promoting personal, organizational, and community wellness She is also a Certified Peer Specialist CPS Gayathri is a member of the Global Speakers Federation and the winner of the prestigious Eli Lilly Welcome Back Award for Lifetime Achievement, the Voice Award for Consumer Leadership sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Shadows in PDF \ Health Services Administration SAMHSA , and the Outstanding Alumna Award from her alma mater George Fox UniversityGayathri s successful battle in overcoming life threatening mental illness and her amazing recovery taught her the power of hope and holistic healing in overcoming chronic illness Now, she shares that message with others Her ability to transform trauma into triumph has inspired and empowered thousands of audience members nationally, in the Sun: PDF ☆ and internationally Individuals and organizations alike applaud Gayathri as an agent of hope and transformational changeGayathri received her first undergraduate degree in science from Bangalore University in India, a second undergraduate degree in Management and Information Systems, and a Masters in Business Administration, from George Fox University in Newberg, OR She lives in beautiful Portland, OR with her family.

Shadows in the Sun: Healing from Depression and Finding
    If you re looking for a CBR and CBZ reader flickering oil lamps, her family protected by Hindu gods and goddesses But as she grew older, demons came forth from the dark corners of her idyllic kingdom with the scariest creatures lurking within herThe daughter of a respected Brahmin family, Gayathri began to feel different I can hardly eat, sleep, or in the Sun: PDF ☆ think straight The only thing I can do is cry unending tears Her parents insisted it was all in her head Because traditional Indian culture had no concept of depression as an illness, no doctor could diagnose and no medicine could heal her mysterious maladyThis memoir traces Gayathri s courageous battle with the depression that consumed her from adolescence through marriage and a move to the United States It was only after the birth of her first child, when her husband discovered her in the backyard clawing the earth furiously with my bare hands, intent on digging a grave so that I could bury myself alive, that she finally found help After a stay in a psych ward she eventually found the light within, an emotional and spiritual awakening from the darkness of her tortured mindGayathri s inspiring story provides a first of its kind cross cultural view of mental illness how it is regarded in India and in America, and how she drew on both her rich Hindu heritage and Western medicine to find healing."/>
  • Paperback
  • 240 pages
  • Shadows in the Sun: Healing from Depression and Finding the Light Within
  • Gayathri Ramprasad
  • 06 June 2019
  • 1616494751

10 thoughts on “Shadows in the Sun: Healing from Depression and Finding the Light Within

  1. says:

    Oh, where do I even start I think I must begin by requesting, nay, begging everyone out there to grab a copy and read this book.One day, you meet someone And you know that someone is beautiful because you look at them and a split second later, you look at them again Something about them has spoken to you She has the most gentle walk his smile seems too big to hold his face Her eyes shine, his nose twitches She has a duck walk, his hair does a cute floppy thing It attracts you it leaves Oh, where do I even start I think I must begin by requesting, nay, begging everyone out there to grab a copy and read this book.One day, you meet someone And you know that someone is beautiful because you look at them and a split second later, you look at them again Something about them has spoken to you She has the most gentle walk his smile seems too big to hold his face Her eyes shine, his nose twitches She has a duck walk, his hair does a cute floppy thing It attracts you it leaves you wanting .But. I don t know Maybe that isn t it that isn t what leaves you yearning a single second s lifetime with them.Maybe Maybe it s their soul.And you want that You want to be a part of that, you want to be a part of their journey because something somewhere has left an indelible impression on you But of course you re scared You ve never felt anything like it you re scared the fire you feel for her will consume you instead You re scared the burning desire for him will singe you, scar you.So, what do you do Do you jump the burning abyss and hope against hope that she ll be there to catch you Or do you step back, into the shadows, and hope that he ll find you one day Shadows in the Sun is a love story.It is a love story between the author and her book.Very rarely, very rarely, you find a book that comes alive because it has its own soul It invites you to be a part of the story it narrates and almost helplessly, knowing you ll be burnt, you find yourself pulled in.Straight sentences, crisp words, blunt phrases and the author weaves poetry She doesn t let you be a part of her entire story, no With melodic precision, she zooms in and out of her childhood, sharpening her focus here, blurring an event there She pulls you in slowly, excitedly, like she s creeping towards a firecracker to light it.And somehow, before you know it, she s lit the fuse at her home on Rama Iyengar Road And in one 200 page explosion, you re living 40 years of her life.The pain Oh, the pain It s such a thin line, this line of awareness, between this side to safety and that side to lost frenzy a parent s disapproval, a lost love, repressed freedom What do you do other than call yourself mad when you don t know mental illness How do you not want to die Did the author make the choice to be burnt, scarred all over again when she wrote this out Oh, how I d like to know.Shadows in the Sun hits home to anybody who has suffered any form of mental illness But it is muchthan that.It is a book on humanitarianism told through one person s story It tells us without telling us why, at the end of it all, we crave one thing and one thing only people And their love Love brings acceptance Acceptance brings joy, joy compassion.And that love lets you dream, it lets you fly All the way to the sun and back and you realize one day that you aren t getting burnt any.One word Read

  2. says:

    Trigger warning Depression, eating disorder, suicide, sexual harassment, anxiety, hsopitilization, drug induced violence, postpartum depression.Oh God This book is everything I needed at the moment Shadows in the Sun is Gayathri Ramprasad s memoir Through the book she shares her journey, her almost a decade long battle with anxiety and depression Mrs R is amazing The narrator grows up in a very strict Hindu household with her loving parents and siblings The first parts of the book talks a Trigger warning Depression, eating disorder, suicide, sexual harassment, anxiety, hsopitilization, drug induced violence, postpartum depression.Oh God This book is everything I needed at the moment Shadows in the Sun is Gayathri Ramprasad s memoir Through the book she shares her journey, her almost a decade long battle with anxiety and depression Mrs R is amazing The narrator grows up in a very strict Hindu household with her loving parents and siblings The first parts of the book talks about her slow descent into adolescent depression It s so genuinely written that it gets painful to read Especially if you re someone who grew up in a similar household with a mental illness She talks about her struggle with finding her identity as a teenager growing up and finding a balance between being the pleaser of the family as well as being her own person The author manages to beautifully her love hate relationship with her conservative mother as well as the Gods that she was rigidly taught to worship.The middle part talks about her marriage to a software engineer, Ramprasad and her migration to America This part deals with the contrast in the lives lead in both the countries and her struggle with finding herself now that she is no longer a part of a huge family with a predetermined role to play.The next part deals with postpartum depression, her descent into the worst parts of her life with depression and finally hospitalization and her awakening or healing.Gayathri Ramprasad is very candid about her battle She shares her thoughts without filters and I think that s what this made the book endearing She does not try to paint herself or her family as anything other than themselves Reading her story about growing up in a Hindu household in India with a family who considered depression a myth or a weakness made me feel understood and normal I realized a lot of things about my own struggle with mental illness while reading this book.The biggest battle that she faces in her life is the fear that she is not normal and she shares how she overcame this through sharing her story and how she adopted a holistic method to heal herself and free herself of the stigma associated with mental health.Finally, my first 5 star book of 2020 I thank the Gods for making me pick up this book last year at a used bookstore It made me cry like a baby way too many times I would recommend it to everyone who grew up in a similar background and have dealt with mental illness I would also recommend it to people who would love to understand how depression works or the stigma related to it in a country like ours.P.S Gayathri Ramaprasad is the founder of a non profit called ASHA International, which strives to provide inclusion and empathy to people battling mental illness

  3. says:

    A little background on me, because I think sometimes people wonder why certain books resonatewith others My masters degree in in clinical psychology, and much of my research in both undergrad and grad school centered around cross cultural education for mental health service providers So I have an academic if not professional, since I never got licensed and have never practiced interest in the topic at hand, but also a personal one It doesn t come up much here, but I ve been fairly ope A little background on me, because I think sometimes people wonder why certain books resonatewith others My masters degree in in clinical psychology, and much of my research in both undergrad and grad school centered around cross cultural education for mental health service providers So I have an academic if not professional, since I never got licensed and have never practiced interest in the topic at hand, but also a personal one It doesn t come up much here, but I ve been fairly open over the years about my own experiences with depression, being in therapy, being medicated, etc And if you haven t heard me talk about it hi ask my about my experience with mental health care So I usually jump at the chance to review books that touch on things like this, and Shadows in the Sun was certainly an excellent one to pick The author shares her at time heartbreaking struggle with her own depression and anxiety, gone diagnosed for so long, with so many people in her life telling her to just shake it off, get over it, stop being so emotional, etc It s hard to read sometimes because you know that she desperately needs better help than she s getting Gayathri doesn t shy away from showing the real toll that depression takes on a person.This book is very well written and engaging The descriptions are vivid, and you can imagine sitting around her family s table in India, being at her wedding, experiencing America for the first time, etc She writes beautifully, and really pulls you into her story, her state of mind, her suffering as she tried to deal with her condition Dealing with mental illness in the first place is difficult, but even so when you throw in different cultural norms and expectations into the mix, and the author handles making that balance clear very well I would recommend this book to anyone looking for an interesting, true look at both mental illness and cultural differences

  4. says:

    I almost didn t finish this book It was dark and depressing for far too long But every time I thought about delving into alight hearted read, this found it s way into my hands instead The last 2 paragraphs made it 100% worth reading In a life filled with love and light, from time to time, my moods continue to cast shadows in the Sun But I no longer curse the shadows, for they have become my greatest teachers Depression in no longer a demon I dread, but a teacher whose wisdom I seek I almost didn t finish this book It was dark and depressing for far too long But every time I thought about delving into alight hearted read, this found it s way into my hands instead The last 2 paragraphs made it 100% worth reading In a life filled with love and light, from time to time, my moods continue to cast shadows in the Sun But I no longer curse the shadows, for they have become my greatest teachers Depression in no longer a demon I dread, but a teacher whose wisdom I seek Although depression has caused a great deal of pain and suffering in my life, it has also blessed me with many gifts It has taught me the power of love to heal all wounds, the fragility of life, and the invincible resiliency of the human spirit Most of all, it has taught me not to fear the darkness in our lives For it is in our darkest hour that we discover the light within the light of love, wisdom, courage and compassion Awesome quote, right Maybe you don t need to read the book haha

  5. says:

    I had the good luck to have met Gayathri Ramprasad at a training she did here in Portland a while back She is an eloquent, engaging speaker and an amazingly bright and industrious person The work she does for the community is incredible I had a hard time imagining her ever having suffered from mental illness, much less being completely debilitated by it After reading the first few chapters of this, I had to put it down Not because it was poorly written it s not, and her descriptions of he I had the good luck to have met Gayathri Ramprasad at a training she did here in Portland a while back She is an eloquent, engaging speaker and an amazingly bright and industrious person The work she does for the community is incredible I had a hard time imagining her ever having suffered from mental illness, much less being completely debilitated by it After reading the first few chapters of this, I had to put it down Not because it was poorly written it s not, and her descriptions of her home in India are vivid to the point you can taste the food and smell the jasmine but because of how close to home it was for me As a mental health clinician with my own struggles with bipolar depression and PTSD, I just wasn t in the right place for it It mirrored too much of my own feelings of hopelessness But I picked it back up after running out of other things to read, and am glad I did There is a lot of sadness and suffering to get through, and if I didn t already know that she made it out on the other side, I might not have stuck with it this time around either In the end, it was an inspiration to me, and I think would be an inspiration to anyone else who suffers from depression, or has a loved one who does Gayathri is a testament not only to the fact that depression isn t dependent on what you have or don t have in life she mentions multiple times that she feels guilty for having a perfect life and not being able to enjoy it , but that there is hope for recovery I m glad I didn t give up on this, butimportantly, I m glad Gayathri never gave up

  6. says:

    As a second generation Indian American woman with depression, I definitely resonated with the way the author described her relatives reacting to her illness the stigma surrounding it I wish she had dug a little deeper and that there wasn t so much exposition about her daily life.

  7. says:

    I have become concerned with learning about mental illness, particularly clinical depression, since a dear friend told me they were diagnosed with it Along with being shocked and unable to absorb the fact that my friend has just unrevealed to me, I realized that I do not know anything about this mental disorder except for its name I decided to learn about clinical depression and this book was one of a few books I listed to read Aside from my adornment for Indian culture, I found this book qui I have become concerned with learning about mental illness, particularly clinical depression, since a dear friend told me they were diagnosed with it Along with being shocked and unable to absorb the fact that my friend has just unrevealed to me, I realized that I do not know anything about this mental disorder except for its name I decided to learn about clinical depression and this book was one of a few books I listed to read Aside from my adornment for Indian culture, I found this book quite interesting and generally helpful in spreading awareness about mental disorders, which is very needed especially in developing countries Gayathri takes us through her experience of suffering with her inner demons of dark and suicidal moods to her journey to find light within Learningabout how painful and dark it is makes my heart ache for my friend and those who suffer I know how important it is to support and embrace those people in their suffering and journey to heal, not only by believing there is hope, but also by truly believing in their ability to heal and thrive Thanks Gayathri and everyone who share their stories with the world bringing light and awareness to our minds and hearts

  8. says:

    The title of this book can be a bit off putting, because it appears to be a self help book I got a few odd looks when I was reading it But don t let that turn you away from it It s a fascinating memoir of one woman s struggle with mental illness and social stigma I learned a lot from this book about Indian culture, human nature, relationships, and yes, depression It was very emotionally moving and a good reminder that you can never know what another person is going through Highly recomm The title of this book can be a bit off putting, because it appears to be a self help book I got a few odd looks when I was reading it But don t let that turn you away from it It s a fascinating memoir of one woman s struggle with mental illness and social stigma I learned a lot from this book about Indian culture, human nature, relationships, and yes, depression It was very emotionally moving and a good reminder that you can never know what another person is going through Highly recommend

  9. says:

    This ebook was free when I downloaded it to my Nook library from Barnes and Noble It is a creative nonfiction type of memoir because the author must fill in her memories, lost to ECT shock treatment for her depression, with stories told by her family members.I recommend it to readers who want to understand behaviors of others who need better mental health treatments.

  10. says:

    one of the best books i have ever read

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *