Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others



[PDF / Epub] ☆ Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others ✩ Sara Ahmed – E17streets4all.co.uk In this groundbreaking work, Sara Ahmed demonstrates how queer studies can put phenomenology to productive use Focusing on the orientation aspect of sexual orientation and the orient in orientalism, A In this groundbreaking work, Sara Ahmed demonstrates how Orientations, Objects, Kindle Ø queer studies can put phenomenology to productive use Focusing on the orientation aspect of sexual orientation and the orient in orientalism, Ahmed examines what it means for bodies to be situated in space and time Bodies take shape as they move through the world directing themselves toward or away from objects and others Being orientated means feeling at home, Queer Phenomenology: MOBI :ò knowing where one stands, or having certain objects within reach Orientations affect what is proximate to the body or what can be reached A queer phenomenology, Ahmed contends, reveals how social relations are arranged spatially, how queerness disrupts and reorders these relations by not following the accepted paths, and how a politics of disorientation puts other objects within reach, those that might, at first glance, seem awryAhmed proposes Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Epub Þ that a queer phenomenology might investigate not only how the concept of orientation is informed by phenomenology but also the orientation of phenomenology itself Thus she reflects on the significance of the objects that appear and those that do not as signs of orientation in classic phenomenological texts such as Husserl s Ideas In developing a queer model of orientations, she combines readings of phenomenological texts by Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau Ponty, and Fanon with insights drawn from queer studies, feminist theory, critical race theory, Marxism, and psychoanalysis Queer Phenomenology points queer theory in bold new directions.Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others

Sara Ahmed is a feminist writer, scholar, and Orientations, Objects, Kindle Ø activist Her research is concerned with how bodies and worlds take shape and how power is secured and challenged in everyday life worlds, as well as institutional cultures.

Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others eBook
    Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others eBook Heidegger, Merleau Ponty, and Fanon with insights drawn from queer studies, feminist theory, critical race theory, Marxism, and psychoanalysis Queer Phenomenology points queer theory in bold new directions."/>
  • Paperback
  • 223 pages
  • Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others
  • Sara Ahmed
  • 02 February 2019
  • 0822339145

10 thoughts on “Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others

  1. says:

    Philosophy The foundation pit of all the sciences and all the arts and all the humanities, no Philosophy A praxis of thinking about stuffthan usual, of following the trail of ideas, seeing where we can go with them something like that It s how I would describe Sara Ahmed s writing An image for it might be going for a walk on a beach and examining the shells, turning them over, listening to them, seeing what colour they are on the inside Except that sounds a bit floaty and whimsic Philosophy The foundation pit of all the sciences and all the arts and all the humanities, no Philosophy A praxis of thinking about stuffthan usual, of following the trail of ideas, seeing where we can go with them something like that It s how I would describe Sara Ahmed s writing An image for it might be going for a walk on a beach and examining the shells, turning them over, listening to them, seeing what colour they are on the inside Except that sounds a bit floaty and whimsical, which this emphatically isn t, it s just that it s an investigation of the often overlooked, a hearing of the seldom heard For example, thinking about Husserl thinking about tables, Ahmed thinks about the labour involved in keeping the table and the space around it clear and available for Husserl to sit and think and write at, labour performed by others, presumably women Ahmed asks what s going on behind Husserl while he s thinking and writing at his writing table She asks and suggests lots of other things too related to the way people are facing, what they are able, thereby, to notice, what effect spaces and objects and work have on bodies, how these effects depend on those bodies, whether they are read as bodies of colour, female bodies, queer bodies.Thinking about orientations around things and toward things shows how things get missed, how barriers that stop some can be invisible to those they let pass Racism isn t much of a problem these days, say my class of white students I was taught, as a student of philosophy, not to value the personal, but to admire the objective Yet, philosophers have spoken as if their own thoughts were universal By investigating the personal, queer feminists of colour like Ahmed have rehabilitated the specificity of experiences, opening paths and windows onto nodes of commonality, meeting points, communal tables as well as places of tension and friction.I m sure I ll read this again and keep making connections, keep following paths I d never noticed One point of affinity I felt was with Elizabeth Grosz s essay Refiguring Lesbian Desire in which she elaborates on the preposition that desire, rather than being a painful lack, is creative and productive For Ahmed desire, specifically lesbian desire, certainly is that it creates paths, reshapes the world I love reading Ahmed, not just because I recognise and learn to recognise the world spoken differently to the way I have been trained to hear it, but because of this pathbrea making world shifting potential she points to

  2. says:

    It s confession time I like to read books on theory, philosophy and semantics for fun One of my recent fun reads and taken off my lengthy wishlist was Queer Phenomenology by Sara Ahmed Since I read this book for fun over a three day weekend, this will be an informal post only and not anything meant to be construed as academic.The cover image of Queer Phenomenology explains quite succinctly what the book is about Phenomenology is the study of structures and space from first person point of It s confession time I like to read books on theory, philosophy and semantics for fun One of my recent fun reads and taken off my lengthy wishlist was Queer Phenomenology by Sara Ahmed Since I read this book for fun over a three day weekend, this will be an informal post only and not anything meant to be construed as academic.The cover image of Queer Phenomenology explains quite succinctly what the book is about Phenomenology is the study of structures and space from first person point of view It is related to other studies such as ontology and epistemology So it s the why is this space the way it is and how does it affect me orgenerally people in the space.Sara Ahmed s four chapter book starts with a dining room scene with a table and chair and asks the questions what does it mean to be oriented What does it mean to be sexually oriented What does it mean then to queer Is it disorientation From a casual reader s point of view, the first chapter was fascinating Looking at a spatial set up often taken for granted, even if the decor may differ from room to room, and applying it to the language of sexual identity was mind blowing But as the book progressed and the same room and the same table and chair were reevaluated over and over, I began to want somethingI wanted analysis of different rooms, or different interpretations of what a dining room space is or even just a table and chair I wanted some examples of queer space if there is such a thing or be challenged into imagining such a thing.So for me, the book was a good starting point I noted down some of theinteresting sounding references and have added them to my wishlist I hope to get to them as I progress through that list

  3. says:

    I m going to say up front that what follows is my interpretation of Sara Ahmed s book, as it stands now This a book that rewards multiple readings and I feel already that my understanding is going to change and grow as I return to it as far as I m considered, that openness to re reading is the pinnacle of what a good philosophical discussion should strive for, and she nails it.I ve read a lot of phenomenology, while still feeling like a neophyte on the subject I ve read some of Heidegger s wo I m going to say up front that what follows is my interpretation of Sara Ahmed s book, as it stands now This a book that rewards multiple readings and I feel already that my understanding is going to change and grow as I return to it as far as I m considered, that openness to re reading is the pinnacle of what a good philosophical discussion should strive for, and she nails it.I ve read a lot of phenomenology, while still feeling like a neophyte on the subject I ve read some of Heidegger s work, some Bernard Stiegler, some of the object oriented ontology folk Essentially, phenomenology is the study of what we perceive around us, as opposed to ontology, the study of our being there s a lot of overlap The problem with a lot of approaches to phenomenology, in my opinion, is that they ignore subjectivity in favour of exploring a universal approach to what it means to be human and perceive things From the ground up or maybe the table up , Ahmed centers her work around the notion of orientation, how our sense of phenomenology is never this abstract, objective thing but shaped by our past bodily experiences.As such, the book is divided into three parts the first part is a general discussion of orientation and phenomenology, the second specifically a queer female phenomenology, and the third, phenomenology as an issue of race The figure of the table plays a major part of the book, as Ahmed gives a very thorough exploration of how past philosophers have used the table as a metaphor for the project of philosophy, and how their orientation to that table reveals or hides aspects of their larger orientation I m always impressed when scholars manage to meaningfully draw on their own experiences, and Sara Ahmed s life as a queer PoC absolutely plays a major role in discussion She also does another thing that I always appreciate in a scholarly book the conclusion is not something that s a tossed off summary, almost afterthought on what came before, but a true culmination and extension of her ideas into the future Adrienne Shaw s Gaming at the Edge is another exemplar of the well written academic book conclusion If the book has any faults, it s that the first chapter felt a little unfocused, especially compared to the latter chapters Perhaps that s deliberate it would make sense that a study of orientation would mean first letting yourself get a little lost Or maybe it s something that will become clearer on re reading, when I re orient myself to her text.I think a good encapsulation of what I found so valuable about this text are the following two quotations.This is from Barthes book on photography, where he indulges in an aside about his aunt this sister of my father never married, lived with her mother as an old maid, and I had always been saddened whenever I thought of her dreary life 53 In contrast, here is one of Ahmed s footnotes In a way, it is fitting that it is the lives and loves of politically active women that sustains this connection to her Pakistani roots women who refuse to define themselves through men, and who orientate their lives creatively around other women This became an especially important connection when my father ended contact with me when I told him about my queer life It is only through aunts that any connections to my Pakistani family is now possible It is interesting to imagine how family stories might be told differently through the very affective labor of the women who don t reproduce the family line who in a conventional family tree would just be an end point In an alternative or queer genealogy, life might even unfold from such points Barthes words have always echoed with me, in the way they are affectionate to the aunt, but simultaneously dismissive and condescending, how quickly he surmises her life must have been dreary and empty Without addressing Barthes directly, Ahmed presents a counterargument Both philosophers are using asides to tie their family relations to their philosophical action, but Ahmed recognizes the potential value of a woman s experience to a family beyond just getting married and perpetuating the lines of inheritance I think it s a perfect example of what a queer orientation has to offer phenomenology and philosophy at large

  4. says:

    Phenomenology provides Ahmed a set of tools for thinking about orientation, or bodily spatial awareness How do you orient yourself, how to follow or what it means to follow a direction, which line shall you follow Through an exhaustive analysis of alternate orientation and philosophical tables yes, actual writing tables as the metaphor that ties this book together from beginning to end Ahmed explores how spatial distinctions and awareness are implicated in how bodies get directed in speci Phenomenology provides Ahmed a set of tools for thinking about orientation, or bodily spatial awareness How do you orient yourself, how to follow or what it means to follow a direction, which line shall you follow Through an exhaustive analysis of alternate orientation and philosophical tables yes, actual writing tables as the metaphor that ties this book together from beginning to end Ahmed explores how spatial distinctions and awareness are implicated in how bodies get directed in specific ways The orientation, for Ahmed, is about how the bodily, the spatial, and the social are entangled

  5. says:

    Sara Ahmed, when she is really on, is one of those rare thinkers who can explore a topic like a comet, casually dropping these fascinating gems of insight on everything and anything that comes to mind along the way I feel this way about Beauvoir s Ethics of Ambiguity, Annemarie Mol s writing, and a few others.And Ahmed gets somewhere, in this book at least, that has major implications She starts chapter one from the basic but enlightening point that all consideration of an object rests on an o Sara Ahmed, when she is really on, is one of those rare thinkers who can explore a topic like a comet, casually dropping these fascinating gems of insight on everything and anything that comes to mind along the way I feel this way about Beauvoir s Ethics of Ambiguity, Annemarie Mol s writing, and a few others.And Ahmed gets somewhere, in this book at least, that has major implications She starts chapter one from the basic but enlightening point that all consideration of an object rests on an orientation and a history that enables that object to appear, weaving threads of Husserl and Marx to look behind phenomenology She does this with a playful and really masterly focus on the table as the object of somewhat embarrassing philosopherly attention from Husserl to Descartes to Marx, Fanon, and so forth It s the most fun crash course in phenomenology I ve experienced.Chapter two takes it profoundly home to the family and heterosexuality, to the shaping of an embodied life from preexisting lines of orientation and the objects that are made available to one This chapter deals with the question of what possibilities are available to a person for whom objects in the world and existing orientations are needed to facilitate the I can both of action and of desire and loving Merleau Ponty, Freud The method has a generous dose of memory and storytelling from her own queer mixed family history.Ch 3 moves to the question of what bodies are not extended or at home in the given world with its available linesthemes are racialization, orientalism, whiteness, habit, drawing on Fanon and again Merleau Ponty, but never losing sight of that table This long chapter concludes with a notion of mixed orientations that can be productively read alongside Anzald a s nepantlera and Mestiza consciousness.The conclusion returns to the queer, objects and perspectives askew, oblique lines of living Her argument here is that deviation should not be enshrined or fetishized as the ground for queer politics, while at the same time the normative lines cannot be followed without falling into a melancholic orientation This sounds negative, but her engagement is so warm and lively, she brings a lot of positive projects to the table as it were It s a powerhouseand a joy to readmaybe this makes Ahmed a failed killjoy, or it makes me guilty, as she would perhaps say, of converting negative affects into the positive Either way, really worth orienting oneself toward this book and letting your table dance

  6. says:

    This is the smartest book I ve ever read It s also one of the most lucid and clearest books I ve ever read Sara Ahmed writes so fluidly, with such insight and clarity, and without the opaque academic jargon you might expect from a book with the word Phenomenology in the title It s rare I get excited over a theoretical philosophical text, but Ahmed s perspective here is truly mind changing This is a book that won t let you look at the world around you the same way again Ahmed is attentive This is the smartest book I ve ever read It s also one of the most lucid and clearest books I ve ever read Sara Ahmed writes so fluidly, with such insight and clarity, and without the opaque academic jargon you might expect from a book with the word Phenomenology in the title It s rare I get excited over a theoretical philosophical text, but Ahmed s perspective here is truly mind changing This is a book that won t let you look at the world around you the same way again Ahmed is attentive to the background in this book the way that we inhabit the world around us, and how the spaces we inhabit, and the bodies and objects within those spaces, shape and are shaped by our contact with them Ahmed ultimately pushes for a politics of disorientation of looking at the world askew, of allowing new bodies and objects to come into view as we take up new perspectives and see the world from a different angle Ahmed reveals how our ways of living and relating to others are shaped by the repetitions of certain gestures and social formations over time, and she looks to new pathways to follow, or to moments where we deviate from following the well worn straightened lines that have come before us, and it is in these moments we can become disoriented in order to shape new contours into the world This is a book I would recommend to anyone 10 10

  7. says:

    It s the kind of books that broaden your mind on a variety of subjects Pretty difficult to read at first, as the first chapter explains what phenomenology is, but if you just hold on, then it helps pretty much to get a lot about what queer is, but also how the world is shape by heteronormativity and how difficult impossible it is not to be affected by it One of those eye opener and ground breaking book.

  8. says:

    A great primer for anyone with an interest in objective analysis of human relationships without employing the scientific lens that puts you, the viewer, above the observed, the object, creating a power dynamic that skews perspective Ahmed wonderfully investigates her world and the objects in it without becoming those objects, putting herself in her environment but still separating herself enough to analyze the great question, why do I feel this way about that

  9. says:

    Never thought I ll ever have a favourite book , but here we are Beautifully written with an incredibly eloquent approach to the subject of phenomenology and that comes from someone who has never read anything on phenomenology Will come back to this time and time again, not only as a reference but as a genuinely enjoyable text to read and reflect on A piece of work full of hope Basically love it love it love it.

  10. says:

    As a PhD student, I spend a lot of time reading highly academic and theoretical textswith that said, this book was so pretentious, I struggled through every page It kind of felt like I was just reading a really artsy, arrogant, overly educated person s journal Most of the other students in my cohort loved it and even organized an Ahmed reading and conference to devote an entire semester s course to readingof this stuff Personally, this is not for me.

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