At the Back of the North Wind



❰Reading❯ ➼ At the Back of the North Wind Author George MacDonald – E17streets4all.co.uk Diamond, son of a poor coachman, is swept away by the North Wind a radiant, maternal spirit with long, flowing hair His life is transformed by a brief glimpse of the beautiful country at the back of t Back of PDF Ç Diamond, son of a poor coachman, is swept away by the North Wind a radiant, maternal spirit with long, flowing hair His life is transformed At the PDF or by a brief glimpse of the beautiful country At the Back of the North Wind This Victorian fairy tale has enchanted readers for than a hundred the Back of PDF ✓ years, and combines a Dickensian regard for the working class of mid th century England with the invention of an ethereal landscape.At the Back of the North Wind

Back of PDF Ç George MacDonald was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian ministerHe was educated at Aberdeen University and after a short and stormy career as a minister At the PDF or at Arundel, where his unorthodox views led to his dismissal, he turned to fiction as a means of earning a living He wrote over booksKnown the Back of PDF ✓ particularly for his poignant fairy tales and fantasy novels, MacDonald inspired many authors, such as GK Chesterton, W H Auden, JRR Tolkien, C S Lewis, and Madeleine L Engle Lewis wrote that he regarded MacDonald as his master Picking up a copy of Phantastes one day at a train station bookstall, I began to read A few hours later, said Lewis, I knew that I had crossed a great frontier G K Chesterton cited The Princess and the Goblin as a book that had made a difference to my whole existence Elizabeth Yates wrote of Sir Gibbie, It moved me the way books did when, as a child, the great gates of literature began to open and first encounters with noble thoughts and utterances were unspeakably thrilling Even Mark Twain, who initially disliked MacDonald, became friends with him, and there is some evidence that Twain was influenced by MacDonaldForinformation, please see.

At the Back of the North Wind ePUB ✓ At the  PDF or
    If you re looking for a CBR and CBZ reader mid th century England with the invention of an ethereal landscape."/>
  • Paperback
  • 272 pages
  • At the Back of the North Wind
  • George MacDonald
  • English
  • 08 March 2018
  • 1428070818

10 thoughts on “At the Back of the North Wind

  1. says:

    3rd time reading this through One of my favorite stories of all time, but honestly, I started to feel that I absorbed as much as I could for this time in my life The thought occurred to me that I might read this oncebefore I die, and that s it We ll see what the years bring.It is a beautiful story Profound Sometimes playful and outlandish in a Lewis Carroll sort of way Honestly, some parts feel like just another Victorian nickel novel But MacDonald always manages to take it beyond i 3rd time reading this through One of my favorite stories of all time, but honestly, I started to feel that I absorbed as much as I could for this time in my life The thought occurred to me that I might read this oncebefore I die, and that s it We ll see what the years bring.It is a beautiful story Profound Sometimes playful and outlandish in a Lewis Carroll sort of way Honestly, some parts feel like just another Victorian nickel novel But MacDonald always manages to take it beyond its 19th century mew, and really succeeds like no author I ve ever known in launching even beyond mere literature You realize at some juncture that it s about you has always been about you Some readers are disappointed in learning that MacDonald is only mildly interested in storytelling He s interested in reaching the reader, making a real connection in spirit, and writes with that goal in mind It s no surprise then that some accuse him of over moralizing his tales, and losing track of the art, but I find him to be doing what he supposed to be doing with his stories, and using the art of storytelling to connect with people He writes honestly, and in some deep paradoxical way I m always convinced that he writes what he sees, and sees what he writes Reading MacDonald always helps me to believe in greater things, in a fuller life potential, in abeautiful God in MacDonald s world.The story is about a boy who meets North Wind, a lovely ancient female embodied in the bitter, wintry wind, who serves as an emissary from God This is truly a story for the childlike, as is all MacDonald s works, but will appeal to today s child much less than in the 19th century North Wind is a metaphor for suffering in the world that has some intelligence behind the fa ade of senselessness, and the wind is described as only one of the various forms that God s messengers may assume to reach us, depending on how ready we are, to help us become who we are As far as the origin of pain, suffering, and so called misfortune , not even North Wind can say what it all means, acknowledging aremote antecedent of sense behind the sense The closest North Wind can come to understanding it all, and maybe the closest MacDonald can get to it, is as a song I will tell you how I am able to bear the suffering of others , Diamond I am always hearing, through every noise and suffering , through all the noise I am making myself even, the sound of a far off song I do not exactly know where it is, or what it means and I don t hear much of it, only the odor of its music, as it were, flitting across the great billows of the ocean outside this air in which I make such a storm but what I do hear is quite enough to make me able to bear the cry from the drowning ship So it would you if you could hear it When little Diamond questions North Wind about why she isn t as good to others as she is to him, the answer deftly slams the forward dialogue into reverse Diamond Why shouldn t you be good to other people as well as to me North Wind That s just what I don t know Why shouldn t I Diamond I don t know either Then why shouldn t you North Wind Because I am.Lest he give up there, North Wind ends with, Besides, I tell you that it is so, only it doesn t look like it That I confess freely Have you anythingto object The first half of the book is a bit fantastical with Diamond s meeting the wind and such, but the second half of the book is mostly preoccupied with Diamond s earthly struggles Though I liked the first half best, the second half is really the important part I suppose, since it is the practical application of North Wind s revelations.I had an incident with this book that is worth mentioning regarding its value in my life My dad had randomly picked this book off my shelf while visiting in Dallas, Texas It fell open to these words North Wind You are quite mistaken Windows are to see out of, you say Well, I m in my house, and I want windows to see out of it Diamond But you ve made a window into my bed North Wind Well, your mother has got three windows into my dancing room, and you have three into my garret You can imagine my father s confusion at reading that section, and later we all laughed as he read it out loud and reminded me why he doesn t read my sort of books Dad passed a few years later a sudden stroke and my brother shared with me a dream he had a short time after dad s death Dad was asking him to close the window because it was cold outside Jeremy asked, Why Because they ll get cold, dad replied For me, and I know this is desperately reaching, it was a vivid reminder that dad had gone to the back of the North Wind, not suffering any longer but we are still here in the cold, in a small corner of God s greater Life, sheltered from some paralyzing horrors, but sheltered also from the truth at the foundation of the most unspeakable sorrows endless warmth, and joy, and love It was almost as if he was saying, Don t weep for me, weep for yourself that you have so far to go in such a chill wind Bottom line, this was a mesmerizing and profound tale, and the peace communicated not merely spoken or written brings such a sense of assurance to me of what God is doing with all this I need as much of these kind of intelligent, lovely reminders as I can get

  2. says:

    At the start, for the first half of it, I struggled to push my way through At the Back of the North Wind I thought it tedious and drawn out But by the time I had waded into the middle, I found I was swimming.I just finished this book, and I have to tell you, I have no way of using my tongue to convey how I feel and what this book has done in me I sit without words, but without the ability to contain the rush of thought and emotion that crowd me on all sides I look about and the only thing At the start, for the first half of it, I struggled to push my way through At the Back of the North Wind I thought it tedious and drawn out But by the time I had waded into the middle, I found I was swimming.I just finished this book, and I have to tell you, I have no way of using my tongue to convey how I feel and what this book has done in me I sit without words, but without the ability to contain the rush of thought and emotion that crowd me on all sides I look about and the only thing that can settle me and quiet me is a morning sunbeam passing through the curtains to the floor I know that sounds rhapsodic and romaunt I m caught up, and enjoying every minute of it, like a man in love But though my culturally inherited masculine reflex wants me to say noand erase all of this, how could I hide from you that bit of mysticism which I am presently enjoying Well, let me try to do some justice to this thing we call a review and actually talk about the book I have one thing to tell you primarily complete the story I read the last chapter twice Mull it over Let thoughts on the whole story come and give yourself time to think about them, to philosophize and wonder And then digest your thoughts This is one of the greatest stories of any kind I have ever known of course, this is only my estimation , and it is thus no surprise to me that C.S Lewis wrote what he did of MacDonald s story making What he does best is fantasy fantasy that hovers between the allegorical and the mythopoeic And this, in my opinion, he does better than any man Most myths were made in prehistoric times, and, I suppose, not consciously made by individuals at all But every now and then there occurs in the modern world a genius a Kafka or a Novalis who can make such a story MacDonald is the greatest genius of this kind whom I know This from a professor of literature at Cambridge.I felt like I had experienced a holy moment when I finished the very last sentence of the last chapter though I wonder if later my words here will seem surfeit But I know they can t, because, as Diamond and the North Wind explain in the latter portion of the book whether the dream is true or not, the thing it has done and the thing it stands for is true and if the thing is true, mightn t we also say that the dream is true At the Back of the North Wind did nothing less to me than to make me aware of the wondrous ordinary that the ordinary is never actually ordinary, but full of wonders, for those willing to perceive them It also made me everconscious of a different way of being, as I fell in love with the character of Diamond a character that is so contented in trust, and fulfilled in love, that it cannot but live for the good of others finding not that its own pleasure and good is overlooked, but that the good of others becomes its own pleasure and good and that it cannot even feign to fear anything finding that it is always watched and always loved by capable hands and full heart.I will leave you to decide whether you will read the book You will or you won t there are other ways to come to these things yourself and other places to find great stories though such transcendence is rare But I don t feel any embarrassment in admitting the influence this book and George MacDonald s other works, each in their own kind, have made on me

  3. says:

    I am so delighted to have found this book amongst the treasures of project Guteberg Thank goodness for public domain books and ebook readers With the low price of admission, I find myself readingandbooks that I might not have otherwise taken the time to look up, or might not have remembered when I got to a library.Once I started reading this book I couldn t put it down However, as opposed to most books that pull you through solely with plot, I found myself going back and re readin I am so delighted to have found this book amongst the treasures of project Guteberg Thank goodness for public domain books and ebook readers With the low price of admission, I find myself readingandbooks that I might not have otherwise taken the time to look up, or might not have remembered when I got to a library.Once I started reading this book I couldn t put it down However, as opposed to most books that pull you through solely with plot, I found myself going back and re reading passages to think about the things MacDonald was saying To me, this was the best MacDonald book that I ve yet read As with Sir Gibbie the main character is a boy who seems almost too good for this world However, far from seeming a prig, this innocent ends up bringing the best out of all those around him Without giving too much away, I ll just say that the imagery, the story, and the very feel of the book will now be one of my definitions of mythopoea I can see how these MacDonald books would have so strongly influenced Tolkien and Lewis in their future literary works.So many of the conversations between North Wind and young Diamond are underlined that I have a hard time picking my favorite part of the book However, I think one of my favorite conversations may have been between these two characters when Diamond is asking North Wind whether she is real or just a dream I feel that this must have in some way influenced Lewis in his ideas presented in his essay Weight of Glory, and in his idea for Aslan.Although the end of the book is something that I suspected earlier on in the book, it did not lose any of its impact for this suspicion To me this was wonderful proof that if a book has true substance behind it, then a suspected end does not ruin the overall story but in fact adds to it due to the sense of realism Maybe this realism is a good refute to those who dismiss fantasy as escapist

  4. says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here spoiler possible The North Wind is Death This book is about the dealings between death and an innocent child It s beautiful, it s tender and sad I read somewhere that Mark Twain struck up a friendship with George MacDonald, and when his daughter died, he remembered fondly the little beat up edition of Back of the North Wind that she loved.George MacDonald is a master story crafter this book is one of his masterpieces Pacing and plot might slow at times, but the teachings here are beyond spoiler possible The North Wind is Death This book is about the dealings between death and an innocent child It s beautiful, it s tender and sad I read somewhere that Mark Twain struck up a friendship with George MacDonald, and when his daughter died, he remembered fondly the little beat up edition of Back of the North Wind that she loved.George MacDonald is a master story crafter this book is one of his masterpieces Pacing and plot might slow at times, but the teachings here are beyond any action adventure A child with perfect trust and faith facing one of the ultimate things that try faith suffering and death We can learn a lot from little Diamond, he has a treasured place in my heart

  5. says:

    I last read this book when I was 9 or 10 years old I remembered the portrayal of the North Wind as a beautiful, comforting woman, but was not able at that age to appreciate her mystical, spiritual significance She now seems to me to be the embodiment of the spirit of love I don t think she is Death, but that she incorporates some of the lovelier, reassuring aspects of death I appreciate Diamond s gradual understanding of her explanation that she must sometimes do things that seem evil but th I last read this book when I was 9 or 10 years old I remembered the portrayal of the North Wind as a beautiful, comforting woman, but was not able at that age to appreciate her mystical, spiritual significance She now seems to me to be the embodiment of the spirit of love I don t think she is Death, but that she incorporates some of the lovelier, reassuring aspects of death I appreciate Diamond s gradual understanding of her explanation that she must sometimes do things that seem evil but that have an ultimate outcome that enhances the good in the world The illustrations by Arthur Hughes in the edition I read reminded me of pre Raphaelite paintings of women with long, flowing hair I m very glad my Vintage Book Circle discussion group chose to read this one I plan to re read both The Princess and the Goblin and The Princess and Curdie sometime very soon now that I ve remembered how much I like George MacDonald s writing

  6. says:

    I recently had an intense, life changing revelation I nearly went insane and spent over 2 weeks in the hospital, diagnosed with hypermania I found At The Back Of The North Wind in the hospital I think left for a purpose , and it described my situation perfectly I did not die visit the back of the North Wind, but the North Wind was synonymous, for me, with the voice of God that resonated in my head, providing infinite wisdom It turned me from a pond into a river, and all my fears and limits I recently had an intense, life changing revelation I nearly went insane and spent over 2 weeks in the hospital, diagnosed with hypermania I found At The Back Of The North Wind in the hospital I think left for a purpose , and it described my situation perfectly I did not die visit the back of the North Wind, but the North Wind was synonymous, for me, with the voice of God that resonated in my head, providing infinite wisdom It turned me from a pond into a river, and all my fears and limits became intransigent no longer This was what happened to Diamond Diamond the Horse represents Christ, and Diamond the boy the enlightened man He goes from fearful, timid, and non communicative to fearless, infinitely courageous, and ultimately communicative The room of boards over the stable was his mind It is oriented in a specific position and cites Orion I think MacDonald may have meant Cygnus, a star formation seemingly referred to in Egyptian pyramids the allusion was attributed, until fairly recently, to Orion and the North Star as landmarks The garden outside the house is Paradise, the garden of innocence, and his and Her s The North Wind s story is that of Adam and Eve told backwards He hears the voice of God, eats the fruit choice , and chooses to accept God, with unwavering faith He comes out of his shelter like shedding his clothes and assumes a new dimension With it comes total enlightenment and benevolence Spoil Alert The ending is not in the least sad or regretful, except that Diamond s family doesn t know the truth of heaven and consciousness s affinity for transmutation Diamond, through his infinite love, inspired and transformed the lives of those around him He is loved by all that choose to give him a chance, but only understood, perhaps, by the other enlightened character, his writer benefactor MacDonald refers to the Ancient Greeks, perhaps the most recent perfect civilization on Earth The Cynics, like Diogenes, strove to achieve one of the aspects of Diamond s enlightenment total happiness and connection to self and environment Today people are basically beasts controlled by riders We are so out of touch with our senses and selves that it is like riding an animal, much like the drunken boor of a horseman In the end Diamond sheds his body and becomes one of the frolicking angels He moved his own rock and went INTO the cave The reverse of Jesus , but the cave, for him, was HIS heaven or afterlife or rebirth he found the one that fit and chose to take it, just like the other angels This writing is sedimentary an amalgamation of layered meanings that can be appreciated by youngsters and scholars alike It is extremely beautiful

  7. says:

    If you are the sort of person who only reads the first few sentences of a review, you d better just look back at my rating to determine my opinion of this book, because I m going to start out by saying critical things However, the books I like best, like my favorite people, tend to be those which are beautiful in spite of their flaws.I never know quite what to say about this story, and so usually I do not talk about it It is considered a children s book, for such, I believe, the author intende If you are the sort of person who only reads the first few sentences of a review, you d better just look back at my rating to determine my opinion of this book, because I m going to start out by saying critical things However, the books I like best, like my favorite people, tend to be those which are beautiful in spite of their flaws.I never know quite what to say about this story, and so usually I do not talk about it It is considered a children s book, for such, I believe, the author intended it, but it is the kind of children s book which is better enjoyed by adults than by children George MacDonald was a Victorian and a Scot, so the tone of the tale is moralistic to the point of preaching and making his young protagonist into an impossible ideal He was fatalistic, but in the everything happens for a reason sense, rather than the gloomy variety The book is also full of some rather odd poetry, and chunks of time and text in which very little action occurs The modern reader who cannot look past this work as a product of its time may find all of this off putting.But if you can look beyond these peculiarities, there is such beauty and thoughtfulness pressed between the leaves of this story The descriptions of Diamond s sojourns with the North Wind are worth reading for their imagery and humor, even if you can t make it through what follows And through the writing comes the conviction that the author was a compassionate and observant man with a great faith in human beings, a quality which, in my opinion, transcends the limitations of era, style, and genre He also has an ear for dialogue which, though old fashioned, makes me laugh out loud in its gentle and understated cleverness.This is, of course, a story about death But it s a lotthan that It s about life and how we choose to live it

  8. says:

    Diamond is a young boy, living in deep poverty with his family in 1860 s Great Britain One night, while trying to stuff rags into holes in the wall, he meets the North Wind, and together they go on a series of adventures The North Wind does things to help others, but she also does things that seem bad, including sinking a ship George MacDonald, I learned, is a respected theologian, and this book is considered his masterpiece He uses the story to share his thoughts on theodicy, as well as oth Diamond is a young boy, living in deep poverty with his family in 1860 s Great Britain One night, while trying to stuff rags into holes in the wall, he meets the North Wind, and together they go on a series of adventures The North Wind does things to help others, but she also does things that seem bad, including sinking a ship George MacDonald, I learned, is a respected theologian, and this book is considered his masterpiece He uses the story to share his thoughts on theodicy, as well as other philosophical and spiritual concepts.I think we forget that life for children did not always have the social safety nets that we had today Diamond s family struggles with poverty and hunger, and when Diamond s father falls ill, it is up to this young child to work and bring home enough money to feed the family Diamond befriends a young girl who begs on the streets for her alcoholic grandmother, a child who has evendifficulties than Diamond I wasn t expecting to learn so much about deep theological ideas and social injustice in a children s book

  9. says:

    It took me awhile to read thisI am a busy mom and it was important for me to find the time to read and savor this in silence which doesn t always happen for me I was disappointed when I couldn t take the time to read this book It is beautifully written It is a fairy tale for both adults and children It makes me want to be like Diamond, not fearing anything and living in the moment Would read it again George MacDonald is so descriptive in his writing At times it seemed as if I was the It took me awhile to read thisI am a busy mom and it was important for me to find the time to read and savor this in silence which doesn t always happen for me I was disappointed when I couldn t take the time to read this book It is beautifully written It is a fairy tale for both adults and children It makes me want to be like Diamond, not fearing anything and living in the moment Would read it again George MacDonald is so descriptive in his writing At times it seemed as if I was there with Diamond

  10. says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here I am indebted to one of my fellow reviewers for my review, whose horrified thoughts on the death of Diamond, prompted me to thinkdeeply about it myself For this reader, Diamond s death was a pointless, disappointing waste, and killing him spoilt the beauty Macdonald s creation This reviewer felt that Diamond should have had his happy ending, one where he grew to a happy, successful and accepted adulthood In saying this, I believe the reviewer has forgotten who the author is and what he I am indebted to one of my fellow reviewers for my review, whose horrified thoughts on the death of Diamond, prompted me to thinkdeeply about it myself For this reader, Diamond s death was a pointless, disappointing waste, and killing him spoilt the beauty Macdonald s creation This reviewer felt that Diamond should have had his happy ending, one where he grew to a happy, successful and accepted adulthood In saying this, I believe the reviewer has forgotten who the author is and what he intended in writing this novel.From my perspective, I believe that George Macdonald could have written no other ending Diamonds death wasn t pointless at all In fact it was a vital culmination to all that had gone before Diamond discovered on the course of his interactions with the North Wind that there wasto this world than what we can see The longing to see and experience this world beyond clung to him and set him apart from the world of people around him Throughout At the Back of the North Wind, Macdonald demonstrated to his readers a spiritual world that is beyond what our eyes perceive However, to have ended there, to only show the unseen world of the living, would have been to truncate and hobble his message As a man of faith, George Macdonald would not have seen death as a pointless waste, but simply a doorway into the great forever As such, he needed to show that the unseen extends beyond this life He could only do this through the death of Diamond and his innocent crossing from this world into the next.The reviewer is also forgetting the era in which this was written Modem children in the western world have little occasion to encounter death It is sanitised and segregated, and given our healthcare, the death of children is not common This would not have been the case in Victorian England Death, including child death, was frequent and children would have been familiar with it Indeed, Macdonald himself experienced much death, having lost his mother as a child, his sister, brother and father as a young man and later four of his own children In that context, I believe the death of Diamond was intended as a fantastical comfort and encouragement to Macdonald s readers, and a reminder that there is something better beyond this world At the Back of the North Wind is one of those books that take time to digest It s been a privilege to encounter it as my introduction to the works of George Macdonald, and I look forward to readingof his writings in the coming months.As I note, I really appreciate the hard work Librivox volunteers put into providing public domain audiobooks In this case, most of the narrators were very good, with just a few that I didn t enjoy But I do wish the book could have been read by just one narrator

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