Contested Island: Ireland 1460-1630



❮BOOKS❯ ✯ Contested Island: Ireland 1460-1630 Author S.J. Connolly – E17streets4all.co.uk Between the s and the s Ireland was transformed from a medieval into a modern society A poor society on the periphery of Europe, dominated by the conflicts of competing warlords Irish and English it l Between the s and the s Ireland was transformed from a medieval into Contested Island: PDF or a modern society A poor society on the periphery of Europe, dominated by the conflicts of competing warlords Irish and English it later became a centralised political unit with a single government and code of laws, and a still primitive, but rapidly developing, market economy These changes, however, had been achieved by brutal wars of conquest, while large scale colonisation projects had created lasting tensions between old inhabitants and recent settlers At the same time the great religious divide of the Reformation had introduced a further source of conflict to Ireland, dividing the population into two hostile camps, while at the same time giving it a new and dangerous role in the conflict between England and its continental enemies Against this confused and constantly changing background, individuals and groups had repeatedly to adapt their customs and behaviour, their political allegiances and aspirations, and their sense of who they were A long and complex story, with many false starts and numerous dead ends, it is the story of the people who became the modern Irish.Contested Island: Ireland 1460-1630

Sean Connolly has taught at Queen s University Belfast since Prior to Contested Island: PDF or his appointment, Connolly taught at the University of Ulster, and worked as an archivist in the Public Record Office of Ireland, now the National Archives of Ireland He has been the editor of Irish Economic and Social History, and a member of the Council of the Royal Historical Society, and became a Vice President of the RHS in He has served on the AHRC Medieval and Modern History Postgraduate Awards panel.

Contested Island: Ireland 1460-1630 PDF/EPUB º
    If you re looking for a CBR and CBZ reader and English it later became a centralised political unit with a single government and code of laws, and a still primitive, but rapidly developing, market economy These changes, however, had been achieved by brutal wars of conquest, while large scale colonisation projects had created lasting tensions between old inhabitants and recent settlers At the same time the great religious divide of the Reformation had introduced a further source of conflict to Ireland, dividing the population into two hostile camps, while at the same time giving it a new and dangerous role in the conflict between England and its continental enemies Against this confused and constantly changing background, individuals and groups had repeatedly to adapt their customs and behaviour, their political allegiances and aspirations, and their sense of who they were A long and complex story, with many false starts and numerous dead ends, it is the story of the people who became the modern Irish."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 426 pages
  • Contested Island: Ireland 1460-1630
  • S.J. Connolly
  • English
  • 05 July 2017
  • 0198208162

10 thoughts on “Contested Island: Ireland 1460-1630

  1. says:

    From the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, as S J Connolly argues in the introduction to this book, Ireland experienced a profound transformation that shaped the contours of the modern nation This transformation, and the adaptation of the Irish people to it is the theme of this work, the first of a two volume history of early modern Ireland In it, he describes Ireland s evolution over a century and a half from a fractious land of competing cultures to one in which English rule was in th From the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, as S J Connolly argues in the introduction to this book, Ireland experienced a profound transformation that shaped the contours of the modern nation This transformation, and the adaptation of the Irish people to it is the theme of this work, the first of a two volume history of early modern Ireland In it, he describes Ireland s evolution over a century and a half from a fractious land of competing cultures to one in which English rule was in the ascendant.Connolly begins with a nuanced portrait of Ireland in the late 15th century, one that challenges the clich s of declining English rule and political dependency upon the Irish lords He argues that the descendants of the medieval English conquest were not as Gaelicized as traditionally thought, as the cultural boundaries between the Gaelic and English lands were blended rather than sharply divided Moreover, he sees English rule expanding rather than contracting during this period, with a mutually acceptable balance of interests established between the English crown and the leading Irish nobility It was during this time that the Kildares emerged as the dominant political power, a position they would hold for the next three generations This, Connolly notes, illustrates the paradox of English power in Ireland at that time, that rule on the cheap was only possible by relying upon a powerful local magnate, yet such reliance on these overmighty subjects left English rule vulnerable to challenges from these figures.It is this paradox which helps to explain why the English rulers abandoned a working governing relationship in the early 16th century, as Henry VII and his ministers, particularly Thomas Cromwell, sought to expand English control and the rule of English law Their goal was to transform Irish nobles from autonomous lords to magnates who exercised local power on behalf of the crown Yet Henry and his successors still proved unwilling to invest the resources necessary to achieve control Even after the suppression of the Kildare revolt in 1535, Henry s governors most notably Anthony St Leger pursued assimilation on the cheap, using a mixture of bribes and occasional force to Anglicize Ireland gradually.Yet the Gaelic system persisted, largely because of the failure of the English to provide the resources necessary to establish a central authority necessary to make it obsolete By the 1580s, the English government decided to adopt a new policy colonization Beginning with the Munster Revolt, the English confiscated land from the leading rebels and awarded it to undertakers Englishmen who pledged to settle the land in return for their allocation Unlike earlier English settlers these new transplants were Protestant, injecting a stable population of recusants into a land which until then had experienced the Reformation only superficially.It is within this context of the growing extension of English control, coupled with the rapaciousness of English officials in dealing with Gaelic lords, that Connolly sees as critical to understanding the circumstances of Tyrone s rebellion He depicts Tyrone himself as a man of two worlds Gaelic by birth, yet heavily influenced by English culture in his upbringing Tyrone s nine year campaign against the English served in retrospect as the last major Gaelic effort to overthrow English rule its defeat paved the way for its ultimate establishment throughout the island, which Connolly describes in clear yet succinct detail Yet the end of Tyrone s rebellion had evenfar reaching consequences The final defeat of the Gaelic lords made the role of the Old English as a loyal alternative to the Gaels less important, and their recusancy correspondinglyso Connolly concludes by describing the religious changes Ireland underwent in the decades that followed, and their role in shaping and changing Irish identities, with a epilogue that foreshadows the turmoil that lay ahead, turmoil for which the new Protestant ruling class was ill prepared to face.Well written and convincingly argued, Connolly s book is a superb survey of the era While particularly strong on the religious and political developments of the period, his examination leave little out, encompassing its economics, society, and culture as well I finished the book eager for Connolly s second volume Given that it will cover the years that are the focus of Connolly s previous research I expect it to be an evenimpressive work, creating what is certain to be the standard text on early modern Ireland for decades to come

  2. says:

    return return I found this a muchinteresting and well structured book than Colm Lennon s Sixteenth Century Ireland By the end of it I had a much better idea of the two key narratives the shift of the Old English areas to permanent alliance with Gaelic Ireland, and the growth in power of the state apparatus centred in Dublin The general failure of the Reformation to take hold in Ireland is a part of this story, but Connolly admits after surveying return return I found this a muchinteresting and well structured book than Colm Lennon s Sixteenth Century Ireland By the end of it I had a much better idea of the two key narratives the shift of the Old English areas to permanent alliance with Gaelic Ireland, and the growth in power of the state apparatus centred in Dublin The general failure of the Reformation to take hold in Ireland is a part of this story, but Connolly admits after surveying the various theories that he does not have a good explanation of why it failed The least satisfactory thing about the book is that the six maps at the end are horrendously mislabelled only one is published with the correct caption return return An unexpected benefit of reading about this period of Irish history is that it gives me a slightly different insight into international relations today Reading how various English military expeditions tended to end not with the defeat of the Irish enemies, but with them being bought off with recognition of their authority and often temporarily converted to allies, has obvious parallels with today s Iraq and Afghanistan And the gradual extension of the central govenment s authority across the whole island has many resonances with state building efforts around the world up to the present return return It is fascinating that the British government in Ireland was utterly unable to cover its costs from locally raised revenue At the start of the book, roughly 90% of Dublin Castle s budget had to be met from Westminster by the end of the book it was down to roughly 30% but that is still a heck of a lot and the cost of this improvement in the finances was the loss of identification with English interests of the vast majority of the previously loyal population One question that is rarely asked is, given the huge costs of Ireland to England, why bother I guess there was a certain amount of protecting existing investments of property and prestige, but the question of securing a geographical back door to the English realm must have been evenimportant just before the start of the sixteenth century, you have Lambert Simnel and Perkin Warbeck, and just after the century ends you have thousands of Spanish troops landing in Kinsale return return Anyway, somewhat heavy going in places, but enlightening all the same

  3. says:

    The first two thirds of the text traverse a period Connolly admits, in an Author s Note, he is not expert in This shows The writing is often opaque, mainly because he goes back and forth giving all possible interpretations of people and events, leaving the reader perplexed rather than enlightened In the last third, covering from approximately 1550 to 1630, the writing isfluent, the argumentconfident What disappointed, indeed saddened me, was the narrative s heavily Anglocentric v The first two thirds of the text traverse a period Connolly admits, in an Author s Note, he is not expert in This shows The writing is often opaque, mainly because he goes back and forth giving all possible interpretations of people and events, leaving the reader perplexed rather than enlightened In the last third, covering from approximately 1550 to 1630, the writing isfluent, the argumentconfident What disappointed, indeed saddened me, was the narrative s heavily Anglocentric viewpoint Ireland and its people, as portrayed here, exist mainly as impediments to higher English purposes Yes, there is acknowledgement of English perfidy in massacres and land seizures, punitive laws and corrupt dealings, but always Connolly seems to suggest the native Irish provoked it He uses the phrase corrosive disillusionment to explain the repeated recourse to state sponsored violence, i.e the English high hopes were disappointed by Irish disdain, which, in turn, encouraged his word the English backlash Colonial apologists have taken this line for centuries I did not expect to find it in a modern history

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