The Winning Weapon: The Atomic Bomb in the Cold War, 1945-50



➶ The Winning Weapon: The Atomic Bomb in the Cold War, 1945-50 Free ➬ Author Gregg Herken – E17streets4all.co.uk s t The Atomic Bomb in the Cold War, This book makes clear how, why, after WWII American diplomats tried to make the atom bomb a winning weapon, an absolute advantage in negotiations with the USSRAck s t The Atomic Bomb Weapon: The Epub Ü in the Cold War,This book makes clear how, why, after WWII American diplomats tried to make the atom bomb a The Winning PDF \ winning weapon, an absolute advantage in negotiations with the USSRAcknowledgmentsPrologueHiroshima after, the atomic bomb in diplomacy,The Atomic curtain, domestic international consequences of atomic energy,Diplomacy deterrence, the Winning Weapon: The ePUB ✓ military dimension,EpilogueNotesBibliographyIndex.The Winning Weapon: The Atomic Bomb in the Cold War, 1945-50

Is a well known author, Weapon: The Epub Ü some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Winning Weapon: The Atomic Bomb in the The Winning PDF \ Cold War, book, this is one of the most wanted Gregg Herken author readers around the world.

The Winning Weapon: The Atomic Bomb in the Cold War,
  • Paperback
  • 452 pages
  • The Winning Weapon: The Atomic Bomb in the Cold War, 1945-50
  • Gregg Herken
  • English
  • 09 December 2019
  • 0691022860

10 thoughts on “The Winning Weapon: The Atomic Bomb in the Cold War, 1945-50

  1. says:

    A dated but well written history of how US policymakers viewed the fact that their country was the only one capable of deploying nuclear weapons in the years prior to losing that monopoly The one thing that tends to grab your attention is how utterly unimaginative they could be Herken starts off with America s post World War II foreign policy and how the US used its atomic monopoly to gain certain diplomatic advantages in the form of both threats and offers of nuclear cooperation and how it A dated but well written history of how US policymakers viewed the fact that their country was the only one capable of deploying nuclear weapons in the years prior to losing that monopoly The one thing that tends to grab your attention is how utterly unimaginative they could be Herken starts off with America s post World War II foreign policy and how the US used its atomic monopoly to gain certain diplomatic advantages in the form of both threats and offers of nuclear cooperation and how it was affected by the growing hostility between the US and USSR when eventually the idea of cooperation became monopoly and exclusion He also covers the debate over civilian vs military control of the nuclear arsenal, and how the notion of international regulation became nixed by the Baruch plan which Herken argues wassymbolic than substantive , and how even the British were sidelined Herken argues that Churchill s Iron Curtain speech was also a bid for a greater British role The rest of the book deals with military planning related to the Bomb from Hiroshima to about 1950 and how it was affected by interservice rivalry Herken emphasizes how simple the plans tended to be despite all the sterile language over strategy, the plans amounted to littlethan Russia s destruction, and US planners consistently refused to rule out the use of atomic weapons or the possibility of an American first strike, and thethe US nuclear arsenal expanded, theexpansive the target list grew When the Soviets tested their own weapon, the US simply looked for apowerful weapon rather than rethink the strategy In fact, US military planners were so ignorant of the matter that they somehow lost track of how few atomic weapons the US even had A good book on the subject, and the sections on military strategy were great The writing is fine if unremarkable, and the subheadings are all cryptic quotations that break up the flow of the narrative and sometimes distract The book draws heavily on documentary sources, and none of the people introduced in the narrative ever come to life Also, Herken often writes that this or that event was an important milestone in US nuclear strategy but never explains why the Berlin airlift or the NATO treaty, for example

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