Pushing the Bear: A Novel of the Trail of Tears



❴Read❵ ➬ Pushing the Bear: A Novel of the Trail of Tears Author Diane Glancy – E17streets4all.co.uk In , , Cherokee were forced from their land to walk miles along the Trail of Tears to present day Oklahoma This illuminating and challenging chronicle of loss, despair, and regeneration Washington Po In Bear: A Novel of ePUB Æ Cherokee were forced from their land to Bear: A PDF/EPUB ¶ walkmiles along the Trail of Tears to present day Oklahoma This illuminating and challenging chronicle of loss, despair, and regeneration Washington Post Book World brings this ordeal to life via the haunting voices of a young Cherokee woman, her husband, and a host of others Cherokee and white, soldier and missionary, parent and child, the living and the deadpp Author appearances.Pushing the Bear: A Novel of the Trail of Tears

Helen Bear: A Novel of ePUB Æ Diane Glancy is a Cherokee poet, author Bear: A PDF/EPUB ¶ and playwrightGlancy was born in in Kansas City, Missouri She received her Bachelor of Arts English literature from the University of Missouri in , then later continued her education at the University of Central Oklahoma, earning her a Masters degree in English in In , she received her Master of Fine Arts from the University of IowaGlancy is an English professor and began teaching in Pushing the PDF or at Macalester College in St Paul, Minnesota, teaching Native American literature and creative writing courses Glancy s literary works have been recognized and highlighted at Michigan State University in their Michigan Writers Series from Wikipedia.

Pushing the Bear: A Novel of the Trail of Tears Epub
  • Hardcover
  • 241 pages
  • Pushing the Bear: A Novel of the Trail of Tears
  • Diane Glancy
  • English
  • 04 July 2019
  • 0151002258

10 thoughts on “Pushing the Bear: A Novel of the Trail of Tears

  1. says:

    What I loved about this book was finishing it and being free to go on to my next book I came close to giving this 1 star but I just couldn t because I loved the map on the inside covers and the maps that are at the front of each chapter, showing the route as the Cherokee progressed, and I like that the Cherokee language is used at times throughout the book.I m very interested in the Trail of Tears but I might have preferred a non fiction book or at the least a much better novel I will not be r What I loved about this book was finishing it and being free to go on to my next book I came close to giving this 1 star but I just couldn t because I loved the map on the inside covers and the maps that are at the front of each chapter, showing the route as the Cherokee progressed, and I like that the Cherokee language is used at times throughout the book.I m very interested in the Trail of Tears but I might have preferred a non fiction book or at the least a much better novel I will not be reading the sequel, Pushing the Bear After the Trail of Tears If not for my real world book club I would have taken a look at the information about the Cherokee oral written language and then abandoned the book there HAVE to be better books about this subject out there.Reading this was a slog It was tedious when it shouldn t be and I just couldn t care that much about the characters when I should have Sometimes I mildly enjoyed this as I was reading but I never got lost in the book.I often like books such as this, with alternating narrators, but here some of the narrators seem to be there just to give the reader the history and background information about the removal While I m interested in the history and was glad to learnabout it, it s didn t make for a scintillating novel The book is written in short little sections so it s way too easy to put down the book, sometimes a helpful thing, but for me I m not so sure it was with this particular book The account felt very jerky there was no good flow to the story.I got really irritated when the conflict between the Cherokee and the European whites was presented as too evenly at fault Yes, it was good to see sympathetic white European soldiers and not perfect Cherokee, but nope, the forced removal wouldn t have happened without the whites coveting the Cherokee s land The Cherokee lived in cabins, had possessions, and were farmers, not at all nomadic by that time Sorry, not evenly at fault at all Not even close I did learn a lot The Trail of Tears was much different than I d envisioned Many things struck me, including the fact that the Native Americans forced from their farms were also forced to pay landowners farmers for passage over their lands We American immigrants have a crazy history, which I suppose it just part of the overall crazy human history.So, I m glad I m done and delighted to move on I would like to read an excellent book or , fiction and or non fiction, about The Trail of Tears If any Goodreads members can recommend any, I d appreciate it I can t recommend this book to anyone, but I m curious about what my other seven book club members will say about this book

  2. says:

    Author is in my church book group so she gave a presentation to our group about why how she wrote the book.

  3. says:

    How many people in the U.S have paid a visit to Talequah, Oklahoma, capital of the Cherokee Nation I have been, and it was well worth the visit Honestly I learnedthere than I learned from this book, although I loved the book So my dear fellow citizens of the United States before you book your trip to Paris or Sydney, why not think about visiting a treasure trove of history right here in our own country I went to Talequah with my family several years ago we visited the Cheroke How many people in the U.S have paid a visit to Talequah, Oklahoma, capital of the Cherokee Nation I have been, and it was well worth the visit Honestly I learnedthere than I learned from this book, although I loved the book So my dear fellow citizens of the United States before you book your trip to Paris or Sydney, why not think about visiting a treasure trove of history right here in our own country I went to Talequah with my family several years ago we visited the Cherokee Heritage Center, with its beautiful museum and recreated ancient village, complete with tour guides to show us the old Cherokee customs and I saw the Trail of Tears pageant at the Tsa La Gui outdoor theater It was truly a moving experience, and the memories have stayed with me Looking back that must have been my motivation for hunting down and reading this book.Truth be told at first this book was awful, but gradually it grew on me At first I was taken aback by the jarring way in which we, the readers, were thrown into this ordeal I felt like the author was hurling fragmented pieces of dialog and thoughts at us it was clear that the people in the story knew each other very well they had been neighbors and friends and relatives before The Trail but we, the readers, don t know them at all, and here we are, making the bumpy wagon ride or walking along with them, hearing their intimate thoughts and words, and not understanding anything It was very frustrating But I kept going, and gradually I got to know and understand the characters in the story I started to like it somewhere between pages 50 and 100 As I continued on, I enjoyed it very much I found myself thinking about the characters throughout my day, and I was earnestly looking forward to the chance to start reading about them again The author spent 17 or 18 years doing research and soul searching for this book, and she s a renowned poet all of this come through in her writing At times the passages flow along in a linear, traditional way, and other times, the book seems crazy or nonsensical but to me, it is only nonsensical in the way a good poem would be Reading the book all the way through, you get an eerie feeling of walking the trail all the way through, for four months hearing bits of dialog from others as you go along, and maybe bumping up against other people and imagining what their thoughts were Sometimes you might pass someone on the trail and never bump into them again That s how it is with life, and I can imagine, that s how it was on the trail It s not a regular book where you ve got these six main characters and they all get accounted for at the beginning and the end Honestly, I feel the book ispoetry than prose And I loved that, once I absorbed and understood it Other things I loved about the book That the author included Cherokee writing throughout beautiful to see The maps helping us see where we were as we continued along the trail The way the characters of Maritole, Knowbowtee, Oganaya, Tanner, Luthy, and Maritole s dad changed and grew throughout the story The way the author showed the mixed feelings of anger, bitterness, regret, self blame, hurt, hope, and pride, on the part of the Cherokee people The pieces of history the author inserts for points of reference The shopping lists and inventories, which give a good picture of daily life THE ENDING OF THE BOOK thank God it was not schmaltzy at all So many good books totally screw up the ending, but this one got it just right I was going to give this 3 stars, but due to the excellent and VERY APPROPRIATE ending, I am cheerfully bumping this up to 4 stars Yeah Now for just some general comments.I disagree with some reviewers who say that the author makes it sound like the Cherokees were to blame partially for their removal from the book it was clear that there was no other option yes, there was anger at the Georgia Cherokee, but the North Carolina Cherokee didn t agree to the treaty and were removed BY FORCE so what other option was there None I think that was clear from the book Yes, the Cherokee were tormented by self blame and guilt, as in, If only we had done X, Y, or Z maybe we could have stayed on our farms but that is only wishful thinking, something that nearly everyone goes through, whenever they suffer a huge loss It is NOT THE SAME as the author blaming the Cherokee for their forced removal There was no pretending that the white man was A OK for the Trail of Tears I don t know where some readers got that Maybe the readers got it from the Author s Note at the end where she says it wasn t a good Indian bad white man story Well, I agree that it wasn t like that she portrayed the Cherokee characters in vivid color, with good qualities, and faults, too, so there was no glorification of the Cherokee But there was also no pardoning of the white man Essentially, she doesn t even portray the white man much, except for one white man character the soldier , but that was just one guy Also, she never gets inside that guy s head the soldier was never one of the characters talking in first person , so we never know what he was really thinking I feel the purpose of this story is to bring the Cherokee people and their suffering on the trail, to life It s not about the white man at all and I do find that refreshing In this book, the white man is on the side lines, and he s not exactly evil or good He s just doing what man does I thought it was interesting in the Author s Note, she was saying that things come back around she said the same farms that were stolen from the Cherokee in Georgia were burned by Sherman s army in the Civil War and that the Cherokee cheated members of a late arriving tribe Osage from Kansas by selling them bad land, and then received their come uppance when oil was found on that land So yes, she is saying, no matter what race you are, you are capable of doing good and evil things Meanwhile I think it was pretty clear that she was saying that the forced removal of the Cherokee was a very bad thing No ambiguity there I think you can acknowledge that evil is inherent in everyone as the author does , and you can condemn certain evil acts which I believe the author does , without condemning everyone of a certain race Because of all of this, I m a bit confounded by some of the reviews I see here on goodreads, expressing dismay that the author was at least partially pardoning the white man for the Trail of Tears That was not the impression I got.So I hope folks can give this book a chance and sink into it like a puzzling and interesting, yet deeply satisfying, piece of historical poetry That s what it was for me

  4. says:

    When I first learned about the Trail of Tears in the 10th grade, I remember thinking Andrew Jackson was an a hole This book confirmed that at least I had good judgment about something when I was in high school It s a shame Jackson is still on the 20 bill given he engaged in what we would likely call ethnic cleansing these days Anyway, I give credit to the writer for capturing the chaos, sorrow, and the great loss suffered by the Cherokee on the Trail of Tears Unfortunately, as for the writ When I first learned about the Trail of Tears in the 10th grade, I remember thinking Andrew Jackson was an a hole This book confirmed that at least I had good judgment about something when I was in high school It s a shame Jackson is still on the 20 bill given he engaged in what we would likely call ethnic cleansing these days Anyway, I give credit to the writer for capturing the chaos, sorrow, and the great loss suffered by the Cherokee on the Trail of Tears Unfortunately, as for the writing and structure of the book, I found it rather disappointing and rather annoying at times For some unfathomable reason, the author chose to include words in the Cherokee language throughout the text As they cannot be sounded out not Romanised , I had to skip them, basically pretending they did not exist However, this breaks the flow of reading and distracts from the reading experience Another major problem is the multiple narrators of the book, with each narrator having a paragraph, or few at most, at a time While multiple narrators can work if done correctly, in this case the effect of jarring and again interrupted the flow Further, though I assume this is actually not the case, it certainly felt as if the book is basically a compilation of journal entries and other information regarding the Trail of Tears that the author found and just decided to cut and paste and call it a novel I say this because often the entries by various narrators don t relate to each other and while some narrators clearly speak to the central focus of the book, others seem to make random and even nonsensical comments which add no little value overall to the story Overall this book feltlike an anthropology project written by a grad student than historical fiction geared towards the general reader

  5. says:

    I forget the technical term for the type of narration this author uses, but she writes about The Trail of Tears from multiple perspectives ie Cherokee men, women, and children and the white soldiers As far as I know the main characters are fictional although the places and events are true It is pretty good, mostly sad, but what I like most about it is that it has the tone of Native American culture ways of living, thinking, and believing It strongly exemplifies the Native American s connec I forget the technical term for the type of narration this author uses, but she writes about The Trail of Tears from multiple perspectives ie Cherokee men, women, and children and the white soldiers As far as I know the main characters are fictional although the places and events are true It is pretty good, mostly sad, but what I like most about it is that it has the tone of Native American culture ways of living, thinking, and believing It strongly exemplifies the Native American s connection to the land and animals Not only does it show the physical struggles that the Cherokee had on the trail, it also shows the spiritual struggle they had, especially when trying to understand why a Christian people would force people off of their land and onto a horrifying 1000 mile walk during the winter months

  6. says:

    Glancy s Pushing the Bear A Novel of the Trail of Tears was absolutely heart wrenching, though beautifully expressed I will now be readingof Glancy s work and readinghistorical Native American novels I highly recommend that everyone read this book It s tough to endure, but their stories need to be heard.

  7. says:

    I gave this book a generous two because even though I couldnt even finish it, I liked the idea of it I was glad to see a personalized account of the trail of tears and I really wanted to like this book but I couldnt get in to it at all Even when relating emotional experiences, the characters words felt hollow and I couldnt sympathize with them Going to try again with another of her books and hope that I like it better

  8. says:

    This book was hard to read due to the subject matter It is so painful to read of the mental and physical anguish the Cherokee suffered on the Trail of Tears This book is rather graphic about each and every day s hardships Readers get the feeling of the extreme suffering experienced It was an American Holocaust.Told with a few Cherokee words and mythology included.

  9. says:

    This book is a moving narrative about the hardships the Cherokee experienced on the Trail of Tears The writing style is beautiful except when it is interrupted by long lists of items and numbers, which are interesting for those who are reading it for historical detail, but frustrating for those who are reading it for entertainment However, not much seems to happen It s constant snow and cold and sickness and anger The book also starts right as the Cherokee are being forced from their homes, This book is a moving narrative about the hardships the Cherokee experienced on the Trail of Tears The writing style is beautiful except when it is interrupted by long lists of items and numbers, which are interesting for those who are reading it for historical detail, but frustrating for those who are reading it for entertainment However, not much seems to happen It s constant snow and cold and sickness and anger The book also starts right as the Cherokee are being forced from their homes, leaving the reader frustrated that they cannot truly understand all that the Cherokee lost.However, the author is able to make the reader sympathize with the highly flawed characters, which is an achievement in and of itself Nevertheless, the most incredible part of this book is how the author writes about the Cherokee experienced the trail through the lens of their culture, beliefs, and stories It s easy to think about how someone living now would have experienced the trail, but this book corrects those assumptions Thus, I would recommend this book to those who are interested in history, but not to those looking to be entertained

  10. says:

    Very complex text Pain and suffering, life and death, forgiveness and regret, but never forgetting.I can t sayright now I read this for school, which I only mention because it was not a good time for me, personally, to read this book, because I am struggling with depression right now That means a book with this much pain is bad for my mental health, which ipso facto does the book a disservice, because it s an important text that I couldn t appreciate It is hard to connect with a book l Very complex text Pain and suffering, life and death, forgiveness and regret, but never forgetting.I can t sayright now I read this for school, which I only mention because it was not a good time for me, personally, to read this book, because I am struggling with depression right now That means a book with this much pain is bad for my mental health, which ipso facto does the book a disservice, because it s an important text that I couldn t appreciate It is hard to connect with a book like this when my mood swings back and forth between apathy and pain But I wish that I appreciated it, because that is what it deserves

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