The Moved-Outers



[Read] ➫ The Moved-Outers Author Florence Crannell Means – E17streets4all.co.uk The captivating story of a Japanese American family in a World War II internment camp who struggle to retain their dignity and identity as Americans The captivating story of a Japanese American family in a World War II internment camp who struggle to retain their dignity and identity as Americans.The Moved-Outers

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Moved Outers book, this is one of the most wanted Florence Crannell Means author readers around the world.

The Moved-Outers PDF ò Hardcover
  • Hardcover
  • 160 pages
  • The Moved-Outers
  • Florence Crannell Means
  • English
  • 14 December 2019
  • 0802773869

10 thoughts on “The Moved-Outers

  1. says:

    Read for Newbery Club in Children s Books group I just couldn t help reading this as historical fiction After all, I did read Farewell to Manzanar, too, and I ve visited the camp myself Twice, in fact, once when the desert had almost reclaimed it, and once later when it was developed as a park Sue Ohara was lucky she wasn t there, but in a better camp.But to think that it was current at the time it was written, and that it didn t win the Newbery Medal Read for Newbery Club in Children s Books group I just couldn t help reading this as historical fiction After all, I did read Farewell to Manzanar, too, and I ve visited the camp myself Twice, in fact, once when the desert had almost reclaimed it, and once later when it was developed as a park Sue Ohara was lucky she wasn t there, but in a better camp.But to think that it was current at the time it was written, and that it didn t win the Newbery Medal I think it s the best and most important book of that year.Consider the details, the subtleties As group member Karol points out, consider the class generational differences among the Japanese themselves, for example To think that, for some, the barracks offeredphysical comfort than their former homes And Kim expresses frustration If I scowl, they say, Look at the Jap, mad at being given a soft living, when his own country s freezing prisoners feet off and starving them to death And if I smile, they say, See the insolent, sneering Jap And if I try to hide my feelings, they say, There s no safety with folks that can hide their thoughts like that And the descriptions I always knew Joshua trees were bizarre looking, but I was never before able to realize that they re like rheumatic giants carrying petrified feather dusters Very good book

  2. says:

    A Newbery Honor book with a copyright date of 1945 Who would have thought it Means was out writing insightful books for children over fifty years ago, books recognized by ALA as excellent Yet I don t remember ever seeing this book before now, not in my library, not on any good book list Why Here s the plot A family of Japanese Americans, who attend church and participate in their community, are sent off to detainment camps in the wake of Pearl Harbor Means is spot on with her portrayals of A Newbery Honor book with a copyright date of 1945 Who would have thought it Means was out writing insightful books for children over fifty years ago, books recognized by ALA as excellent Yet I don t remember ever seeing this book before now, not in my library, not on any good book list Why Here s the plot A family of Japanese Americans, who attend church and participate in their community, are sent off to detainment camps in the wake of Pearl Harbor Means is spot on with her portrayals of the teenage son and daughter who react to their detainment with two different feelings and two different actions This is a book I had to double check several times was it really written in 1945 And it makes me want to knowabout Means How did she come to know the culture of this story so well

  3. says:

    I am impressed that this book was written so soon after WWII I rather enjoyed this story of Sue and her family after they have been forced to move out of their home and enter an internment camp I liked how Sue s perspective on the internment was often different than her brother s and their different approaches to making it through the experience Based on the other books I read about the internment this summer, this felt pretty realistic to me And very readable.

  4. says:

    This 1945 Newberry Honor Roll book was one of the first written on the subject of the internment of Japanese American citizens during World War II Told from the point of view of Sue and Kim Ohara, high school students in small town California, it gives a moving and descriptive version of the emotions and activities of various families that have been relocated to the camps and discusses their struggles and ambitions to be normal American high school and college students.

  5. says:

    I m sad this book is out of print It s a great look at what it might have been like for a Japanese American family during the internment What I liked best about the book is that it didn t treat Japanese Americans as a monolith it depicts people from all walks of life, all socio economic statuses, all differing opinions about the government, the war, and what was being done to them I noticed that many other reviewers of this book question the loyalty to America that the teenage characters in I m sad this book is out of print It s a great look at what it might have been like for a Japanese American family during the internment What I liked best about the book is that it didn t treat Japanese Americans as a monolith it depicts people from all walks of life, all socio economic statuses, all differing opinions about the government, the war, and what was being done to them I noticed that many other reviewers of this book question the loyalty to America that the teenage characters in this book display, but having studied the internment, I found it true to life for many Japanese Americans They WERE Americans They loved their country And even though they were upset and angry about what was being done to them, many of them were anxious to prove their American loyalty Many young men did so by enlisting in the military At first, they weren t accepted into the military due to their enemy alien designation, but after clearing that designation they could enlist or even be drafted

  6. says:

    I was absolutely fascinated to find a book about Japanese American internment that was writtenwhile it was still happening Yes, it sounds dated, and yes it reads a little too cheery about that pioneer spirit and sacrificing for your country But it still confronts all the important issues and has interesting dynamics between different generations and different classes.Worth reading if this part of US history interests you.

  7. says:

    Follows the story of a Japanese American family who are forced to move into a detention camp during WWII Not a terrible treatment of the subject, but the insistent patriotism of the main characters, despite all they go through, is a little grating and rings a little false.

  8. says:

    This is one of the earliest if not the earliest fiction book about the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II It s also a very comprehensive book about what happened The story centers on two families where there is a sort of Romeo and Juliet thing going, with the fathers of the two families do not get along.Sue Ohara is the main female character, 18 years old Their family live in California and end up being moved out, first to the Santa Anita Assembly Center and later to the Am This is one of the earliest if not the earliest fiction book about the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II It s also a very comprehensive book about what happened The story centers on two families where there is a sort of Romeo and Juliet thing going, with the fathers of the two families do not get along.Sue Ohara is the main female character, 18 years old Their family live in California and end up being moved out, first to the Santa Anita Assembly Center and later to the Amache Internment Camp.The story covers Pearl Harbor, how the FBI arrested people and held them without charge, how the attitude of some of the people who knew the family changed after Pearl Harbor, the process of moving out and all that entailed, the journey to Santa Anita and the horse stalls that awaited them as a new home, the development of that center and then the moving out to Amache and how that went.It also covers the varying attitudes of people in the camps, the Zoot Suiters and how some of the younger ones in the camps got into trouble It even covers a shooting of one of the camp people who was out on a work detail All of these things covered in the book are real things that happened to real people.One interesting thing it does is go into the origin of people, such as those born in Scotland and Germany who settled here, and how they were known simply as Americans, vs the people of Japanese descent who, even if born here, were still known as Japanese Americans rather than just Americans.The book also talks briefly about the development of anti Japanese prejudice on the West Coast long before the war ever began It even includes some of theoutrageous newspaper claims about the camps, such as the claim that the Japanese Americans were getting better food than other Americans.On top of all this, the book is very readable and very well done as a book on that level

  9. says:

    An interesting read I was surprised at how accepting the family seemed to be at having to give up most all of what they had to be moved on I found the interment camps seemed to not be bad places and that one could buy what one needed I need to do some research, but I can t believe those in the camp that they had such good attitudes of where they were and could have and how they had to live.

  10. says:

    Although this book does struggle with the injustice of the Japanese American internment, I question the accuracy of the overall impression the book gives of the internment conditions and the level of loss people experienced Notably, this book was published in 1946, four years after Pearl Harbor was attacked and one year after the end of WWII.

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