The Far Shore



❰Reading❯ ➺ The Far Shore Author Edward Ellsberg – E17streets4all.co.uk The story of the greatest invasion in history, as told by a master military engineerThousands of men desperately struggling through the surf, blood spilling into the sea and mud, bullets whizzing by t The story of the greatest invasion in history, as told by a master military engineerThousands of men desperately struggling through the surf, blood spilling into the sea and mud, bullets whizzing by their ears this is The Far Shore of Omaha Beach on June ,Here, The Far MOBI :ò we see D Day through the eyes of an experienced engineer, brought out of a brief retirement to help make this invasion and eventual Allied victory possible Rear Admiral Edward Ellsberg The final book in Ellsberg s World War II trilogy, The Far Shore takes the reader right up to the front lines In Under the Red Sea Sun and No Banners, No Bugles, Rear Admiral Ellsberg cleaned up impressive wrecks in the Red Sea and North Africa He answers the call to action despite his advancing age and failing heart, to once again do the impossible Ellsberg is tasked with floating the artificial harbors that are key to Operation Overlord Ellsberg, a celebrated writer in addition to his gifts as a naval engineer, pulls no punches in this firsthand account of the preparations and bravery necessary to win on D day.The Far Shore

Edward Ellsberg graduated first in his class from the United States Naval Academy in After he did a stint aboard the USS Texas, the navy sent Ellsberg to Massachusetts Institute of Technology for postgraduate training in naval architecture In , he played The Far MOBI :ò a key role in the salvage of the sunken submarine USS S and became the first naval officer to qualify as a deep sea diver Ellsberg later received the Distinguished Service Medal for his innovations and hard workRear Admiral Ellsberg was awarded the CBE by His Majesty King George VI, and two Legions of Merit by the United States Government.

The Far Shore ePUB ï The Far  MOBI :ò
    The Far Shore ePUB ï The Far MOBI :ò once again do the impossible Ellsberg is tasked with floating the artificial harbors that are key to Operation Overlord Ellsberg, a celebrated writer in addition to his gifts as a naval engineer, pulls no punches in this firsthand account of the preparations and bravery necessary to win on D day."/>
  • hardcover
  • 318 pages
  • The Far Shore
  • Edward Ellsberg
  • 22 September 2017

10 thoughts on “The Far Shore

  1. says:

    General Omar Bradley is credited with saying You can almost always force an invasion, but you can t always make it stick Edward Ellsberg s The Far Shore detailed how the Allies made D Day stick Captain Edward Ellsberg, the U.S Navy s preeminent expert on maritime salvage, was sent to London by his old friend Admiral Ernest King, the commander of the U.S Navy His mission was to advise the staff of the U.S Navy in Europe on all matters pertaining to Operation Mulberry Mulberry was the c General Omar Bradley is credited with saying You can almost always force an invasion, but you can t always make it stick Edward Ellsberg s The Far Shore detailed how the Allies made D Day stick Captain Edward Ellsberg, the U.S Navy s preeminent expert on maritime salvage, was sent to London by his old friend Admiral Ernest King, the commander of the U.S Navy His mission was to advise the staff of the U.S Navy in Europe on all matters pertaining to Operation Mulberry Mulberry was the code word for all equipment and activities connected to the emplacement of artificial harbors off the invasion beaches of Normandy Often confused for the caissons themselves erroneously called Mulberries , Mulberry was all encompassing The project included the Phoenix 2,000 6,000 ton floating caissons that would anchor the breakwater, the Bombardon 200 ft floating steel breakwater stations, the Lobnitz semi floating 200 ft pierheads, the Whale pontoon supported roadways, and Gooseberry the cover word for the plan to sink superannuated ships to create a temporary breakwater The artificial harbor operations would shape the invasion s progress until the Allies could seize a port and make it usable a key point considering German skill in demolition of all types of facilities After Cherbourg was captured on 27 June, Col Viney of the U.S Army Engineers wrote The demolition of the port of Cherbourg is a masterful job, beyond a doubt the most complete, intensive, and best planned demolition in history Cherbourg s port facilities were inoperable until late July Without Mulberry, the tanks, soft vehicles, food, ammo, gasoline and troops needed to repulse German counterattacks could not have landed in adequate amounts nor with the necessary speed Even the four day gale of 19 22 June didn t cut off supplies over the beaches Despite the loss of all the Whale roadways, the serious damage to many Phoenix caissons, and the destruction of a number of the scuttled vessels of Gooseberry, the work went on The Allies huge fleet of DUKWs took cargo directly from anchored freighters and ferried the loads ashore in a endless merry go round of resupply On 24 June, 11,500 tons came in beating the Lobnitz and Whale record of 9,000 tons By June 26, the daily rate was 14,500 tons By 3 July D 27 , 929,000 troops, 586,000 tons of supplies, and 177,000 vehicles had passed over the British and American invasion beaches combined Operation Mulberry succeeded The Far Shore provided a different perspective on D Day, but included a blow by blow account of the landing and fighting on Omaha Beach Ellsberg devoted considerable attention to the supporting units ashore The actions of the U.S Army combat engineers and the U.S Navy demolition groups were awe inspiring Those servicemen deserved the highest recognition for dedication to duty under the bloodiest and most chaotic of circumstances The author gave detailed descriptions of various naval activities on and before D Day, including rundowns with the pros and cons of the various amphibious vessels and other sea craft supporting the invasion and conducting the landing High praise was awarded to the U.S Naval Shore Fire Control Parties NSFCP The Germans learned to their misery the impact of observed fire from a battlewagon s 14 inch naval guns augmented by a shower of 4 inch and 5 inch shells from Royal Navy and U.S Navy tin cans Ellsberg was an accomplished writer He enjoyed much success as a novelist and memoirist in the thirties His professional expertise as a salvage officer and well honed skills as a wordsmith were both on display here The Far Shore was just a step behind Under the Red Sea Sun, as in the former Ellsberg was simply an observer, but in the latter an actor He dedicated his book to Captain Dayton Clark and the men of the U.S Navy who played vital roles in the success of D Day As he wrote They made it stick Readers with an interest in the hows and whys of D Day s success or the particulars of Operation Mulberry should pick up a copy of The Far Shore It is solid Four Star material

  2. says:

    I have not read all that much about the Allied landings at D Day other than what happened with regard to the Canadians at Juno beach, but I have visited Normandy and seen the remains of the Mulberries so I picked this book as part of a Goodreads Buddy read on amphibious landings It is the third part of a trilogy and I have not read the other books in the series but felt it stood well on it s own.It was written by Rear Admiral Edward Ellsberg who had many years experience working in salvage He I have not read all that much about the Allied landings at D Day other than what happened with regard to the Canadians at Juno beach, but I have visited Normandy and seen the remains of the Mulberries so I picked this book as part of a Goodreads Buddy read on amphibious landings It is the third part of a trilogy and I have not read the other books in the series but felt it stood well on it s own.It was written by Rear Admiral Edward Ellsberg who had many years experience working in salvage He had been retired from active service due to cardiac problems but after some rest in the US he managed to talk his way back into active service and was sent to the UK where he was assigned to sit in a locked room reading the book with all the details on operation Overlord The dedication at the beginning of the book is quite telling You can almost always force an invasion, but you can t always make it stick General Omar Bradley to the war correspondents on the eve of D Day in Normandy To CAPTAIN DAYTON CLARK and THE MEN OF THE NAVY HE LED in FORCE MULBERRYThey made it stick Captain Clark was charged with getting the Mulberries to Omaha Beach and getting them established and running to their top capacity as without a natural port, the Allies were in desperate need of an artificial one so they could maintain ammunition supplies and transport both men and equipment ashore as needed The task of refloating the Mulberries was initially given to the Royal Engineers, but Captain Clark was convinced they could not succeed at it and that the job should be given to the Royal Navy He had spoken to everyone he could think of but no one seemed to believe him Ultimately, Ellsberg was sent to Selsey Bill to see the Mulberries and give his opinion based on his experiences as a salvager He discovered to his dismay that Clark had a valid concern but initially had difficulty getting anyone to act on his recommendations Ultimately his superior used networking to reach the King who sent Churchill to have a look The job was then quickly transferred to the Royal Navy but Ellsberg was commanded to stay close in case they wanted to consult his American expertise They didn t, but he still found ways to be useful and he had a good view of what was going and ultimately did go to the Far Shore where his skills and advice were utilized.His descriptions of the early events of D Day and the slaughter involved were horrific and difficult to read It seemed like a total catastrophe with the weather being one of the worst enemies as it led to damage to the Mulberries as they were being transported There had been six different things set up to help protect the soldiers who would be landing, but every single one of them failed In spite of that, progress was made and ultimately the Mulberries had much to do with the success of the invasion at Omaha Beach Cherbourg as a naval port had been basically destroyed by the Germans before they abandoned it so the Mulberries continued to be important.Ellsberg did a good job describing the tension and action as it evolved but there were two things missing for me I was reading a Kindle Book and don t know what a hard copy of the book is like, but there were no maps in the Kindle version and they would have been very helpful in understanding the action as it was evolving.Secondly, the glossary came at the end of the book rather than the beginning Ellsberg referred to lots of equipment by initials and until I read the glossary at the very end, I wasn t really sure what all of them meant I would definitely read other books by this author though and felt that the book contributed a lot to my understanding of what happened at Omaha Beach

  3. says:

    More of Ellsberg s Excellent Story TellingThe descriptions of the events before, during, and after D Day equal Elksberg s descriptions of his personal accomplishments in the Red Sea and the Mediterranean However we see him only occasionally in this book Most of the book is a description in exquisite detail of the preparation for and execution of the invasion of Normandy Ellsberg s major contribution to this effort is his work with the floating bridges onto Omaha Beach A great story well tol More of Ellsberg s Excellent Story TellingThe descriptions of the events before, during, and after D Day equal Elksberg s descriptions of his personal accomplishments in the Red Sea and the Mediterranean However we see him only occasionally in this book Most of the book is a description in exquisite detail of the preparation for and execution of the invasion of Normandy Ellsberg s major contribution to this effort is his work with the floating bridges onto Omaha Beach A great story well told, but the lack of the personal thoughts of this Salvage Officer left me wanting

  4. says:

    Very interesting Having been to the Beaches of Normandy on a tour did I learn about the concrete boxes there, and wonder what they were We did the Tourist not and claimed the dunes, trying to manage what it must have like for the troops and boats on D Day. But if course could not even begin to truly know how it was really done This book was a wealth of information, and makes me very proud to be an American. Thank you for these facts of War.

  5. says:

    Saving D day from catastropheOne of most detailed accounts of D Day and Normandy by the man who helped provide the massive materiel needed when no shipping ports were available The portable Mulberry docks allowed up to 15,000 tons a day of equipment, ammunition, and gasoline to flow from transports at sea to the beach and beyond allowing Allied armies to overwhelm German defenses.

  6. says:

    Excellent even for a a student of the war The author s writing skills are second to none The book is interesting from a logistical standpoint yet never slow or boring This is a subject only rarely covered in relation to the invasion, and then only in general The details covered in this book make it truly a WW II must read I wished it were much longer.

  7. says:

    Great readThe story telling style is not what I m used to, and I don t necessarily agree with all of the larger picture side stories But that said, this lends nice details that I don t always see in books discussing the difficulties that the mulberries posed.The only OCR issue that really bothered me was consistently spelling Pointe du Hoc as Pointe du Hoe But at least it was consistent.

  8. says:

    Great read Sometimes you forget all the things that had to happen to make the invasion a success From food to especially armor and artillery that had to get to where it was needed This book made me feel as if I was there.

  9. says:

    Unknown HistoryA great revealing of some of the bad luck and bungling of operations involved in the Normandy invasion So many young men died because of some serious mistakes Bet this side of the story was never told.

  10. says:

    Very Interesting Heavy on very readable technical information, this was a fascinating read Learned many things Could not put this down Been reading WWII books all my life, this is one of the best.

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