Bahçede Eğlence



❰BOOKS❯ ⚣ Bahçede Eğlence Author Katherine Mansfield – E17streets4all.co.uk Katherine Mansfield g ndelik olaylar n i inden duygu d nyas na y nelen, ruhsal at malar n st ne e ilen derin bir g zlem g c ve iirsel gelerle s slenmi diliyle farkl bir slup geli tirmi tir Bah ede E l Katherine Mansfield g ndelik olaylar n i inden duygu d nyas na y nelen, ruhsal at malar n st ne e ilen derin bir g zlem g c ve iirsel gelerle s slenmi diliyle farkl bir slup geli tirmi tir Bah ede E lence nin incelikli ve rt l anlat m nda ehov un etkisi sezilir Kitapta yer alan l Albay n K zlar d k r kl n n en ustaca yaz lm yk lerindendir Mansfield bu kitab yla k sa yk n n bir edebi t r olarak geli mesine nemli katk larda bulunmu tur.Bahçede Eğlence

Kathleen Mansfield Murry n e Beauchamp was a prominent New Zealand modernist writer of short fiction who wrote under the pen name of Katherine MansfieldKatherine Mansfield is widely considered one of the best short story writers of her period A number of her works, including Miss Brill , Prelude , The Garden Party , The Doll s House , and later works such as The Fly , are frequently collected in short story anthologies Mansfield also proved ahead of her time in her adoration of Russian playwright and short story writer Anton Chekhov, and incorporated some of his themes and techniques into her writingKatherine Mansfield was part of a new dawn in English literature with T S Eliot, James Joyce and Virginia Woolf She was associated with the brilliant group of writers who made the London of the period the centre of the literary worldNevertheless, Mansfield was a New Zealand writer she could not have written as she did had she not gone to live in England and France, but she could not have done her best work if she had not had firm roots in her native land She used her memories in her writing from the beginning, people, the places, even the colloquial speech of the country form the fabric of much of her best workMansfield s stories were the first of significance in English to be written without a conventional plot Supplanting the strictly structured plots of her predecessors in the genre Edgar Allan Poe, Rudyard Kipling, H G Wells , Mansfield concentrated on one moment, a crisis or a turning point, rather than on a sequence of events The plot is secondary to mood and characters The stories are innovative in many other ways They feature simple things a doll s house or a charwoman Her imagery, frequently from nature, flowers, wind and colours, set the scene with which readers can identify easilyThemes too are universal human isolation, the questioning of traditional roles of men and women in society, the conflict between love and disillusionment, idealism and reality, beauty and ugliness, joy and suffering, and the inevitability of these paradoxes Oblique narration influenced by Chekhov but certainly developed by Mansfield includes the use of symbolism the doll s house lamp, the fly, the pear tree hinting at the hidden layers of meaning Suggestion and implication replace direct detail.

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  • Paperback
  • 228 pages
  • Bahçede Eğlence
  • Katherine Mansfield
  • Turkish
  • 07 April 2017

10 thoughts on “Bahçede Eğlence

  1. says:

    Piazza del Duomo is my least favourite place in Florence I always hurry through it Probably San Marco except at four in the morning and St Peters are my least favourite places in, respectively, Venice and Rome so I guess I just don t respond very well to the grandiose I prefer what s smaller,secret,ostensibly self effacing A criticism often levelled at Katherine Mansfield s stories are that they are small things, limited in scope Lawrence in Women in Love famously depicted her Piazza del Duomo is my least favourite place in Florence I always hurry through it Probably San Marco except at four in the morning and St Peters are my least favourite places in, respectively, Venice and Rome so I guess I just don t respond very well to the grandiose I prefer what s smaller,secret,ostensibly self effacing A criticism often levelled at Katherine Mansfield s stories are that they are small things, limited in scope Lawrence in Women in Love famously depicted her as Gudren, a brilliant but limited miniaturist She herself, close to death, remarked that she d only produced little stories like birds bred in cages She s often compared unfavourably with Virginia Woolf But it s worth remembering that had Woolf died the same year as Mansfield she would only have written her first three books The Voyage Out, Night and Day and Jacob s Room and consequently almost certainly would not now be known to us as one of the great moderns In all probability her reputation would be on a par with many of theobscure women writers of that time now published by Virago Had she died at the same age as Mansfield she would only have written The Voyage Out Herein lies the tragedy of KM s early death Had she lived even another ten years it s not unlikely she would have gone on to equal Woolf s achievement The best stories in this collection areinnovative and fresh and lively than anything Woolf had written at this time In fact she makes Woolf appear at this point in her writing career a bit of a stiff frumpy Victorian in comparison She knew she was going to die while writing many of these stories and this is evident in the wonder the natural world has for her easy to see why her and Lawrence got on so well both take the same kind of delight in the natural world Woolf s nature descriptions, on the other hand, are alwaysaridly intellectualised It s also evident in the depths of loneliness and longing in virtually all the characters, the alienation they feel from the warm vibrant central thrust of life But never does she strike a morbid or self pitying note Mostly she writes with great wit and vitality and a keen eye for the telling detail of any given moment She s also brilliant at extracting nuggets of gold from the mundane In one story, Ma Parker is a housekeeper whose beloved grandson has just died She cleans for a literary gentleman every Tuesday The literary gentleman offers his condolences but his real concern is to reproach her for mislaying a spoon of cocoa People wonder how Nazism happened or Aleppo goes on happening Here s how at bottom the absence of cocoa in the house islikely to rouse us to protest than the suffering of a fellow human being we don t know The first three stories At the Bay, The Garden Party and The daughters of the Late Colonel are absolute gems The other stories are mostly tremendously readable without quite hitting the heights of the first three and there s a couple of duds towards the end My favourite photo of her

  2. says:

    And as I got this collection from my son for Christmas, I had to let it jump the queue As it rushed past the pile of waiting, bitterly frustrated heavy and important novels, it winked cheerfully What is it to a Katherine Mansfield short story that other books, in my possession for decades, have an important message to deliver After all, she delights by pointing at the small, private gestures and parallel existences without judging eitherthan necessary.A successful garden party coincide And as I got this collection from my son for Christmas, I had to let it jump the queue As it rushed past the pile of waiting, bitterly frustrated heavy and important novels, it winked cheerfully What is it to a Katherine Mansfield short story that other books, in my possession for decades, have an important message to deliver After all, she delights by pointing at the small, private gestures and parallel existences without judging eitherthan necessary.A successful garden party coincides with a fatal accident, leaving a young woman a widow with many small children in a poverty stricken street A first ball offers a moment of insight into future boredom, only to wipe out the deeper understanding immediately again, not to spoil the moment A work life spent creating an ideal family nears its exhaustion, a woman faces rejection and rehabilitation within an hour of perfect terror, another thinks about choices made in life, for service, against marriage Would the opposite have made her happier, unhappier, different, the same Who knows.Katherine Mansfield, the only author of whose writing Virginia Woolf claimed to have been jealous, moves between social classes, age groups, and gender with the ease of a truly great and careful observer She moves from grief to happiness and worry, and back again, creating a microcosm of perfect accuracy wherever she lets her mind stop to describe in a few words a world complete in its complex relationships.What a delightful way to close my reading year by finally getting to read an author long postponed, and then be blown away by her lighthearted depth

  3. says:

    Considering Katherine Mansfield was stricken with tuberculosis at the time of writing this collection, you simply wouldn t believe that to be the case whilst indulging in her gorgeous prose I imagine her, pen in hand, under clear blues skies, relaxed in a tranquil garden, with various birds singing a joyful tune, whilst the distant sound of the sea caressing the shore, cool and calmly creating a scene of such bliss When in all likelihood she was cooped up in bed feeling terrible Most writers Considering Katherine Mansfield was stricken with tuberculosis at the time of writing this collection, you simply wouldn t believe that to be the case whilst indulging in her gorgeous prose I imagine her, pen in hand, under clear blues skies, relaxed in a tranquil garden, with various birds singing a joyful tune, whilst the distant sound of the sea caressing the shore, cool and calmly creating a scene of such bliss When in all likelihood she was cooped up in bed feeling terrible Most writers nowadays can t write this good, even with the added benefit of not being seriously ill.Widely regarded as a pioneer of the form, Mansfield focused on capturing the psychology and inner lives of characters through free indirect discourse and epiphanies, with sudden moments of realisation and insight playing a big part in the stories Unlike traditional narratives, the stories typically begin in the heart of a moment and end abruptly The writing is so convincing, it s almost like an invasion of privacy, you feel so close to the heart of the characters actions and words, that they could suddenly turn to the reader at any given moment and whisper please, give me some space.Some of the later stories barely last fifteen pages, but even then, just within this short period of time, she manages to connect easily with her audience, as Mansfield strove for absolute precision and distillation, writing in a letter that, ideally, there mustn t be one single word out of place, or one word that can be taken out That s precisely the feeling you get It s little wonder Virginia Woolf was jealous of Mansfield s work This coming from one of the great writers of the 20th century Mansfield s influence and contribution to literary modernism has even played a big part in shaping writers to this day.After reading only the first few pages of the opening story At the Bay it was easy to discover that she had a great talent After getting through all of them, I am in little doubt, she is one of the finest short story writers I have come across The stories here work not in plots, but in moods and emotions built on a fascination with people, the substance and different shades of life There are passing joys, and the lingering of sadness, the particular feeling of a time of day, the brief state of minds that chase each other across human souls like small shadows across the water A collector of small emotions was she, caught on the wing, never pinned down or bottled in her pages, but kept alive there in all their fragile iridescent colours.Mansfield was a connoisseur of the gentle ripples that carried muchsignificance than the thrashing waves She had a prodigious ability to give you in a story a total effect of beauty without using phrases of which any single one stands out, and without letting you know how she has done it Highlights At the Bay The Garden Party The Daughters of the Late Colonel Life of Ma Parker The Voyage Miss Brill Her First Ball

  4. says:

    714 The Garden Party, Katherine MansfieldThe Garden Party, is a 1922 short story by Katherine Mansfield The wealthy Sheridan family prepares to host a garden party Laura is charged with instructing the workers on the placement of the marquee Her haughty air quickly disintegrates into an intimidated admiration for the workingmen, with whom she feels a personal connection Laura s mother, Mrs Sheridan, has ordered masses of lilies, to both their delight Laura s sister Jose tests the piano, a 714 The Garden Party, Katherine MansfieldThe Garden Party, is a 1922 short story by Katherine Mansfield The wealthy Sheridan family prepares to host a garden party Laura is charged with instructing the workers on the placement of the marquee Her haughty air quickly disintegrates into an intimidated admiration for the workingmen, with whom she feels a personal connection Laura s mother, Mrs Sheridan, has ordered masses of lilies, to both their delight Laura s sister Jose tests the piano, and then sings a song in case she is asked to do so again later After the furniture is rearranged, the Sheridans learn that their working class neighbor Mr Scott has died While Laura believes the party should be called off, neither Jose nor their mother agrees Laura eases her conscience by deciding to forget the matter until the party is over When the evening comes, Mrs Sheridan tells Laura to bring a basket full of leftovers to the Scotts house to expose her to the world beyond their estate Laura is led into the poor neighbors house by Mrs Scott s sister, sees the pitiable figure of the widow, and is led to the late husband s corpse Here, Laura is intrigued by the sublimity of the corpse s face, and she finds death just beautiful as life Having left the house, Laura meets her brother Laurie in an alleyway She finds herself unable to explain life and death concisely, and Laurie understands that his sister has come to realize her own mortality 1994 137118 03 1399

  5. says:

    I could probably list like twenty good literary reasons to pick any of Mansfield s collection of short stories her prowess as a writer, her life experiences, which probably served as inspiration for many of her tales, the strong resemblance of her modern narrative outline with Chekov s, the subtle portrayal of the quotidian as a still frame for social stereotyping and gender roles, her acute observations and insights into the human psyche but I will stop here because I believe all those reason I could probably list like twenty good literary reasons to pick any of Mansfield s collection of short stories her prowess as a writer, her life experiences, which probably served as inspiration for many of her tales, the strong resemblance of her modern narrative outline with Chekov s, the subtle portrayal of the quotidian as a still frame for social stereotyping and gender roles, her acute observations and insights into the human psyche but I will stop here because I believe all those reasons are secondary to the matter at hand.Mansfield is a must read simply because she has a voice of her own, like no other, and her voice is magnetic, elegant, alert, and sharp as a needle Her refreshing descriptive skills are never at odds with her poetic evocation of time and place and her characters possess a sinuous simplicity, a graceful spontaneity that exude vulgarity and charm in equal measures, making them faithful mirrors to our fears, expectations and concerns.In Mansfield s dexterous hands, even misery and frustration have a sense of rhythm that is suspended in time by the sheer delight of reading perfectly composed sentences that tell millions of stories within other stories, lifetimes within lifetimes, realities lost in what could have been, all of them tightly woven into a still moment, forever a possibility, immune to the passage of time.Favorite stories in this collection At the Bay Mr and Mrs Dove Marriage la Mode Her First Ball

  6. says:

    It is always a joyful occasion for me to meet an author whose words and phrases I cherish and reflect on in my mind I m truly amazed at her imagination to capture every little moments in life,and to turn the unimaginable into the tangible through her sensitive and sometimes curious eyes.Fifteen short stories contained here are only an extension of mundane,everyday life,but it shows us a good indication of how colorful,passionate,and tragic our life can become under a great writer.I highly recom It is always a joyful occasion for me to meet an author whose words and phrases I cherish and reflect on in my mind I m truly amazed at her imagination to capture every little moments in life,and to turn the unimaginable into the tangible through her sensitive and sometimes curious eyes.Fifteen short stories contained here are only an extension of mundane,everyday life,but it shows us a good indication of how colorful,passionate,and tragic our life can become under a great writer.I highly recommend this to every one who likes reading between the lines,and intricate nuances and charcters rather than plots This novel gives me pause to think one sitting books aren t always wonderful I d like to save another star aside for rereading

  7. says:

    I wondered as I read, Mansfield seemed to be somewhere between Chekhov and Kafka, but I only see tuberculosis linking the three Short fragments of an emotional life revealed Have you ever seen the mirror scene from Duck Soup I picture Virgina Woolf and Katherine Mansfield like that the same, but different, but one maybe clinging to an idealised lost mother, the other keen to escape, the mirror in fragments.In the face of death, which in a variety of flavours seems present in all these stories I wondered as I read, Mansfield seemed to be somewhere between Chekhov and Kafka, but I only see tuberculosis linking the three Short fragments of an emotional life revealed Have you ever seen the mirror scene from Duck Soup I picture Virgina Woolf and Katherine Mansfield like that the same, but different, but one maybe clinging to an idealised lost mother, the other keen to escape, the mirror in fragments.In the face of death, which in a variety of flavours seems present in all these stories either as an event, a presence, a promise, or at a slight remove social death, the death of hopes In the face of all this death there is a hunger for emotional intimacy, but The Stranger it can t compete, death will play the last card and win the trick I was struck by An ideal Family how the work of the paterfamilias funds the leisured life of the rest of the family, this is a familiar notion, even still an ideal, yet here it is deeply unsatisfactory, the father doesn t really recognise his youngest daughter and there is a strong sense that neither daughters nor wife have any connection with him any, this deeply normative division of labour is here fundamentally alienating and the old man can only dream of his tired body walking away mechanically without him.The first story in this collection At the Bay is like a single continuous panning camera shot flowing from character to character, person to person Personally I lost track completely, when characters reappeared in camera view I could not remember if they were children last seen playing on the beach or adults held rigid and upright by imperial corsetry corsets, upon reflection pop up regularly in these stories too So I might feel this was still a writer learning her craft, playing with styles and approaches, a Virginia Woolf working on a broader social canvas on a smaller scale A sense of a slightly desperate playfulness, laughing before the plague, a keenness for emotional intimacy which will either be denied or achieved at a cost Mr Mrs Dove, Marriage a la Mode.I am struck by how unrelenting Mansfield s vision is in the face of death one only strives for emotional contact or shrinks from life, nothing else gives comfort, not the natural world people only recognise Roses apparently although some plants can be used as set dressing though they may damage one s clothes The Garden Party , there is music but that seems to come from one s emotional state so it reflects rather than transforms The Singing Lesson Hedonism is possible and has value as a distraction from DEATH but that s about it It gives a double sense of the outsider to her writing, not only was she a colonial, but also disconnected from the normal business of the daily grind, because for her that rat race would be far shorter than average and had no power to blind her to the looming grave

  8. says:

    Some of these stories feellike impressions or sketches, seconds caught in one precise moment The young protagonist from Her first ball, like the title itself implies, attends her very first ball, she s excited and a little nervous, and observing dancers experiences disturbing thoughtwas this first ball only the beginning of the her last ball after all EponymousMiss Brill is a middle aged woman spending her leisure time in park observing other people, considering it as a kind of play Some of these stories feellike impressions or sketches, seconds caught in one precise moment The young protagonist from Her first ball, like the title itself implies, attends her very first ball, she s excited and a little nervous, and observing dancers experiences disturbing thoughtwas this first ball only the beginning of the her last ball after all EponymousMiss Brill is a middle aged woman spending her leisure time in park observing other people, considering it as a kind of playeven she had a part to finally find herself an object of scrutiny and mockery from young couple Or the hero fromThe stranger impatiently awaiting on the shore for his wife to find out that the latter was the only witness of death of young man on the ship, and this knowledge is like a thorn to him, for this revelationspoilt their being alone together There always will be a ghost of young stranger between them.Miss Meadows fromThe singing lesson is having a hard time because Basil broke off her engagement so the teacher orders the girls to sing sad melodies, but when it appears to be a false alarm the tone of the song changes radically Mr and Mrs Dove in turn is a story of Reginald and Anne, he s docile and she s capricious and there is no chance for marriage, for it would mirror life of her birds,away she runs, and after hercomes poor Mr Dove, bowing and bowingand that s their whole life.This collection is rather uneven but it contains some gems, and these for me were The daughters of the late Colonel, in turns poignant and hilarious look at two old women facing reality after their despotic father s death, the title Garden Party where young, sensitive Laura must face the truth that where some people are having good time others at this time die, and At the bay, rather novella than story, that looks like impressionistic picture, you almost can see brush strokes here and that reminded me a bit of Virginia Woolf.Mansfield was a keen observer, both people and surrounding world She has created a whole gallery of various types from a jailbailt fromThe young girl, switching from babyish to coquettish demeanour, throughThe lady s maid dismissing chance for marriage and personal life to stay with her mistress to hunted old woman from Life of Ma Parker looking only for a placewhere she could hide and keep herself to herself Mansfield looks closely at the world as well the beach, the gardens, the writer s apartment, the dead old man s room or the ladies dressing room She had an eye for detail and these stories are like little etudes from ordinary life, excercises from mundanity seemingly nothing happens and life just goes on

  9. says:

    When I was going through my Bloomsbury period about twenty years ago, I read everything I could about the central members , and as a consequence Katherine Mansfield came into the equation through being a friend of Virginia Woolf I read biographies about the former which I loved as she appeared to be such an interesting and gifted person and I particularly enjoyed the biography by Antony Alpers which delves into many other aspects of her somewhat short tragic life, including her final searc When I was going through my Bloomsbury period about twenty years ago, I read everything I could about the central members , and as a consequence Katherine Mansfield came into the equation through being a friend of Virginia Woolf I read biographies about the former which I loved as she appeared to be such an interesting and gifted person and I particularly enjoyed the biography by Antony Alpers which delves into many other aspects of her somewhat short tragic life, including her final search for truth in the teachings of the Russian mystic G.I Gurdjieff I found her letters and journals excellent but her short stories rather slow and lacklustre at the time many people will no doubt disagree with me Nevertheless, I thought that perhaps now was a good time to try some different unread stories by her The Garden Party and Other Stories seemed as good a time as ever.It s interesting to note how her friends viewed her and that Virginia Woolf once said I was jealous of her writing The only writing I have ever been jealous of Woolf also, jealously, wrote, theshe is praised, theI am convinced she is bad And as for D.H Lawrence, with whom Mansfield had a fraught friendship Well can you imagine a supposed friend behaving in the following fashion On one occasion he visited Wellington, New Zealand, her birthplace, and was moved to send Mansfield a postcard bearing a single Italian word, Ricordi memories It was a small and cryptic gesture of reconciliation they d fallen out badly and in his previous letter he had said You are a loathsome reptile I hope you will die Returning to this book, as I ve digressed, I think the fifteen stories that make up this set are skilfully written, but not for me.Many people, no doubt, will also agree on the following review that was given about this book Innovative, startlingly perceptive and aglow with colour, these fifteen stories were written towards the end of Katherine Mansfield s tragically short life Many are set in the author s native New Zealand, others in England and the French Riviera All are revelations of the unspoken, half understood emotions that make up everyday experience from the blackly comic The Daughters of the Late Colonel , and the short, sharp sketch Miss Brill , in which a lonely woman s precarious sense of self is brutally destroyed, to the vivid impressionistic evocation of family life in At the Bay All that I write, Mansfield said, all that I am is on the borders of the sea It is a kind of playing If I hadn t read this book before reading that review, I would have been swayed immediately and acquired it and that s for sure But I m street wise now, in that I ve recently found out I m my own person and will not let others influence me That s what I m saying now anyway.There s a certain naivety about The Garden Party I also found it odd that two such similar names were used for the brother and sister, Laurie and Laura Sheridan She is supposedly in charge of organizing the garden party, as her mother doesn t really feel up to it, and has the very difficult task of having to decide the exact location of the marquee She also rather likes the workmen involved there Oh, how extraordinarily nice workmen were, she thought Why couldn t she have workmen for her friends rather than the silly boys she danced with and who came to Sunday night supper She would get on much better with men like these It s all very frivolous and absurd in that she is confined inside her own safe world with comfortable surroundings the family has a tennis court, and for the garden party there are many flowers, niceties and yet a vulgarity such as flags on sandwiches, etc , and yet it s us as opposed to them , i.e the working class, the unfortunate creatures who live along the road So when a poor young carter, Mr Scott, is killed rather closely to their house, Laura wants to have the garden party cancelled as a sign of respect But we can t possibly have a garden party with a man dead just outside the front gate Nevertheless, her very silly mother breathes a sigh of relief when she hears that he has not been killed on their property and so that was fine to continue with the garden party Laura is thus dispatched at her mother s insistence to visit the widow, carrying some of the remains of their garden party food in a basket what an insult and upon arrival there, she is quite horrified to find herself in this disgusting working class house and then the biggest humiliation arrives when she is forced to view Mr Scott laid out in the house There lay a young man, fast asleep sleeping so soundly, so deeply, that he was far, far away from them both Oh, so remote, so peaceful He was dreaming Never wake him up again..He was given up to his dream What did garden parties and baskets and lace frocks matter to him He was far from all those things He was wonderful, beautiful And Laura wanted to cry.I have ambivalent feelings about this story in that I loved and loathed it at the same time The last two paragraphs of this short story were inane and I nearly abandoned the book there and then But then again, I reasoned, the others may be better That s the beauty of short stories, there s always choice Miss Brill and her fur, I must admit, were slightly different and there is a rather amusing ending Although it was so brilliantly fine the blue sky powdered with gold and great spots of light like white wine splashed over the Jardins Publiques Miss Brill was glad that she had decided on her fur Her First Ball with Leila was also good, The wonders of the dance and the quite an old man fat, with a big bald patch on his head took her programme and murmured, Let me see, let me see and disappears with an excellent ending too.On the whole though, the other twelve stories are rather mundane and I m not too impressed with the writing style or the content Short stories have to sparkle and these appear to be trite and meaningless, and so, so dated well to me anyway I m sure, however, that there are many people who love the works of this author

  10. says:

    I read that D H Lawrence once wrote to Katherine Mansfield You are a loathsome reptile I hope you will dieThank you, Lynne Ah, the people I have often wished to say the same thing to Not you, of course, never you But I am not made of such stern stuff as DH Anyhow, I did not think Miss Mansfield was a loathsome reptile Quite the reverse she was a beautiful reptile She had a cool gaze which swept insight and judgement over this human race of ours, the parts that she knew anyway, an I read that D H Lawrence once wrote to Katherine Mansfield You are a loathsome reptile I hope you will dieThank you, Lynne Ah, the people I have often wished to say the same thing to Not you, of course, never you But I am not made of such stern stuff as DH Anyhow, I did not think Miss Mansfield was a loathsome reptile Quite the reverse she was a beautiful reptile She had a cool gaze which swept insight and judgement over this human race of ours, the parts that she knew anyway, and she judged life to be sad Not tragic, just very sad Husbands desperate for their wives to love them when they know they never will, for instance This turns up in a couple of stories in one, Marriage a la Mode , the husband works in London all week earning a pile and comes home to his family at weekends His wife gets herself a whole new crowd of friends Bohemian artists, poets, you know and he s completely out of his depth She s drifting away They re always there After one weekend like this, on the train back to London, he writes his wife a long letter She reads it in amazement, and starts laughing her head off Her friends want to know what s so funny So she reads it out When she reached the end they were hysterical Bobby rolled on the turf and almost sobbed Oh Isabel, moaned Moira, that wonderful bit about holding you in his arms I wasn t especially brimming over with Mansfield love when I was reading most of this stuff, in the back of my head I was thinking okay, another one to tick off from The List of Unread Literature o the awful List keep it away from me but I found that the stories have an afterglow, they re like those lovely paintings by Corot, Pissarro and Sisley, just ordinary streets and fields, but so intensely understated, or understatedly intense One story, Her First Ball reminded me specifically of Renoir s brilliant Her First Evening Out So I give this a generous 4 stars, really I think it s 3.5.My favourite story was The Daughters of the Late Colonel Oh fine women of Goodreads who are on the whole demographically between the ages of 25 and 40 see for further interesting details please never turn into the daughters of the late colonel when you grow up But I can t imagine that you would for a moment My God, I remember creatures like this from my tiny youth, ancient relatives like Aunt Alice who was not any kind of real aunt Ah I recoiled, recoiled from the plunging dramatic unexpected powdery kisses, and oh how I had to sit there, not there, and eat this seed cake and say how lovely it was even though I was about puking, oh the unfathomable rules of social engagement, I practically had to tell them thank you for the air I gratefully breathed whilst in these old houses with their doyleys and antimacassars and rugs for the unwary was I clumsy I was I was bound to knock over some knick knack, usually a glass pony or some animal rendered into a delicate shape designed to shatter if you looked at it wrong No, old women aren t like that any , thank God They re so much better They go shark wrangling and ski backwards up Mount Kilimanjaro these days The plates of dainties have been abandoned along with the inch thick face powder I know global warming s a major downer, but some things are so much better than they used to be

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