JLA Presents: Aztek: The Ultimate Man



[Ebook] ➩ JLA Presents: Aztek: The Ultimate Man By Grant Morrison – E17streets4all.co.uk From writers Grant Morrison , Batman and Mark Millar Ultimates, Civil War comes Aztek, the visionary hero from the s In these stories from Aztek The Ultimate Man Aztek fights the forces of evil in Van From writers Grant Aztek: The MOBI ò Morrison , Batman and Mark Millar Ultimates, JLA Presents: PDF/EPUB ² Civil War comes Aztek, the visionary hero from the s In Presents: Aztek: The Epub á these stories from Aztek The Ultimate Man Aztek fights the forces of evil in Vanity City, where he meets costumed characters including Green Lantern and The Joker Collecting Aztek The Ultimate ManDrew Geraci.JLA Presents: Aztek: The Ultimate Man

Scottish comic book Aztek: The MOBI ò author Grant Morrison is known for culture JLA Presents: PDF/EPUB ² jamming and the constant reinvention of his work He is known Presents: Aztek: The Epub á for his nonlinear narratives and countercultural leanings in his runs on titles including DC Comics Animal Man, Batman, JLA, The Invisibles, Action Comics, All Star Superman, and Doom Patrol, and Marvel Comics New X Men and Fantastic Four Many of these are controversial, yet rate in some of the most critically acclaimed and popular books He is also active in screenwriting.

JLA Presents: Aztek: The Ultimate Man MOBI ä JLA
    JLA Presents: Aztek: The Ultimate Man MOBI ä JLA of evil in Vanity City, where he meets costumed characters including Green Lantern and The Joker Collecting Aztek The Ultimate ManDrew Geraci."/>
  • Paperback
  • 240 pages
  • JLA Presents: Aztek: The Ultimate Man
  • Grant Morrison
  • English
  • 21 October 2019
  • 1401216889

10 thoughts on “JLA Presents: Aztek: The Ultimate Man

  1. says:

    This book is unreadable Literally I mean, the series itself is horrible, yes But also, somehow, this book has a massive printing error that emits almost the entirety of issue 6, instead printing issue 7 twice I thought this was possibly only the case with my copy, but after Googling it, it seems like this occurred with the entirety of the print run So, every single trade paperback of Aztek The Ultimate Man out there in the wild is missing about 20 pages of content, and DC never bothered This book is unreadable Literally I mean, the series itself is horrible, yes But also, somehow, this book has a massive printing error that emits almost the entirety of issue 6, instead printing issue 7 twice I thought this was possibly only the case with my copy, but after Googling it, it seems like this occurred with the entirety of the print run So, every single trade paperback of Aztek The Ultimate Man out there in the wild is missing about 20 pages of content, and DC never bothered to reprint or recall it Truly one of the most unforgivable publishing mistakes I ve ever seen.Luckily sort of , I have access to the DC Universe app, which has the missing issue available to read So, I have read the entire series, and I can also say, even with that issue included, this is one of the sloppiest, most aggravating comics I ve ever read The information they left out of the print book barely matters as is the case with essentially everything in the entire series.I ve now read three Morrison Millar team ups, the others being Marvel s Skrull Kill Krew and their run on Vampirella, and man, they do not make a good team I can t tell exactly what it is about their collaborations that is so abysmal Morrison is one of my favorite comic writers of all time, and Millar is y know, not But he can write a damn sight better than this, as can Morrison, so the fact that their mutual efforts are always so scattershot and badly written is very perplexing.My feeling is, they somehow completely mute each other s most out there, bizarre impulses, which, for these two, are kind of the thing that makes them great Rather than brimming with wild ideas, they instead just spew cliches and boring dialogue while also adhering to zero sense of structure or narrative build.It is borderline impossible to understand what is going on at any point in this book, and not in Morrison s usual trippy, LSD addled way Plot threads simply don t connect There s no cause and affect in this book No character development No sense of scale, no definition of setting, no understanding of what s at stake at any given moment Hell, you can t even visually tell what s going on due to N Steven Harris s confusing layouts and the muddled, indistinct coloring.The biggest sin committed here, I believe, is the utter lack of character development Aztek, a brand new hero to the DC Universe, is dropped into Vanity, a new city in the DC Universe, and we re expected to just go along with it We aren t even told what his powers and objectives are until issue 8 That s 7 entire issues of Aztek fighting random villains you ve never heard of minus a completely unearned appearance of The Joker without having even the most basic understanding of who the hell the hero is.I genuinely think this is a prime example of how not to write a superhero comic The creative team does literally everything wrong I found myself getting genuinely angry at how lazy it was, whereas normally when I don t like something I just kind of give up on it and shrug Aztek The Ultimate Man, to put it simply, sucks

  2. says:

    Now, those of you who remember Aztek can skip this next bit Those of you who don t, well, here s the skinny back in the day, Grant Morrison and Mark Millar co wrote this short lived series 10 issues about Aztek, the Ultimate Man Sorry, got a little carried away there for a second The back cover copy has this to tell us about Aztek Trained from birth, he is the pinnacle of human perfection, his unique armor giving him powers and abilities far greater than most of Earth s heroes Like a Now, those of you who remember Aztek can skip this next bit Those of you who don t, well, here s the skinny back in the day, Grant Morrison and Mark Millar co wrote this short lived series 10 issues about Aztek, the Ultimate Man Sorry, got a little carried away there for a second The back cover copy has this to tell us about Aztek Trained from birth, he is the pinnacle of human perfection, his unique armor giving him powers and abilities far greater than most of Earth s heroes Like all those who came before him, his life has been dedicated to guarding against a great and ancient evil bent on the destruction of humankind Like his predecessors, Axtek does not know when evil will strikeonly that he must be ready when it does Dramatic and original, no Alright, to be fair, there s no indication that Morrison and Millar are anyresponsible for the cover copy than, say, Marketing, but it certainly points very clearly to one thing the book trades no pun intended , as much other work by both Morrison and Millar does, on its relationship to the standard tropes of superhero comics As if to underscore the metacomics approach often associated with Morrison, DC has chosen to highlight Morrison s role over Miller s, granting him top billing over the title, while Millar is relegated to second banana status down with the penciler N Steven Harris and inker Keith Champagne Further, they ve tried to give this a little bit of mainstream cachet by associating it with the JLA probably not a bad decision, given the fact that Aztek s own title was unable to wrap up his storylines, leaving much of that burden to be carried by Morrison s run on the JLA, soon to be reprinted in DC s new Deluxe format The book is set in one of the DCU s trademark fictional cities, in this case, Vanity Really They couldn t come up with something a little , um, believable I mean, I know you will believe a man can fly and all, but my Coleridgean suspension of disbelief was wearing a little thin right away It just seems a littlewell, dopey In any event, Vanity is, as you might well surmise, not a nice place In fact, it s so not nice that new villain types most of them mind numbingly dumb but that s sort of supposed to be the point, cause it s metafictional, you know the Piper, Synth, Death Doll, Fixit, the Lizard King, Deathgrip, Bloodhound, Tattoo, and AWOL are positively popping out of the proverbial woodwork This is the sort of nod towards city as character that was exploited to such good effect in James Robinson s Starman, but here it just feels a little flat.Likewise, the story itself never seems to gather any real momentum, and it certainly isn t aided by N Steven Harris workmanlike pencils There s some interesting layout work here, but on the whole the facial expressions are awkward and not very expressive I was getting a sort of poor man s Jackson Guice vibe from the art, but, to be fair, I don t want to sour you on Harris current work based on this particular trade Heck, I don t even know what Harris current work even looks like ExtrasWell, that d be a big fat nothing, and in the case of Aztek, a hero many buyers may not be familiar with, it s also too bad A foreword or editorial note or even a marketing blurb telling a reader where to go forAztek y goodness would have been a great service to the reader.RecommendationBorrow a friend s copy, but you can probably safely skip a purchase Heck, you could probably even find the individual issues for far less than the cost of the trade.Grant Morrison, Mark Millar, and N Steven Harris JLA Presents Aztek the Ultimate ManDC Comics, 2008240 pp.19.99 paper ISBN 978 1 4012 1688 7

  3. says:

    By Grant Morrison and Mark Millar, I would be willing to put big money on being able to guess who was writing during which parts At some point, in the copy I have, there was a misprint and it skipped ahead, then went backwards, and the whole affair was already so Morrison y that I didn t even notice at first His stuff is so non linear and difficult to follow that I couldn t tell the difference between it and a misprint The first few issues were pretty good I liked where it was going Nothing By Grant Morrison and Mark Millar, I would be willing to put big money on being able to guess who was writing during which parts At some point, in the copy I have, there was a misprint and it skipped ahead, then went backwards, and the whole affair was already so Morrison y that I didn t even notice at first His stuff is so non linear and difficult to follow that I couldn t tell the difference between it and a misprint The first few issues were pretty good I liked where it was going Nothing Earth shattering, but just fine And then it got super weird, his girlfriend ish got turned into a one foot tall statue or something Or mummy There s this pretty hilarious part later on where he s looking at her in some kind of tank, because as we all know, recovery in weird fiction always happens in a tank, and he s like, This blows She was the only woman who ever loved me And I was like, Bro, you guys went out for one half of one date I know this is a tough loss for you, but she was turned into a teeny mummy That s like 1000 times worse Have some sense of scale, dude

  4. says:

    A completely new character created by Morrison, to obviously be inducted into the Justice League, based on all the cameos from major DC heroes Cool because he s got no idea what he s doing, both socially and as a hero, but he s got the right motivation and great training powers This is the only volume of the series, but I would follow up on this by checking the relevant JLA issues he features in I look forward to seeing how his career role ends up playing out.

  5. says:

    Way overrated This was acclaimed when it was first released as singles.

  6. says:

    One of DC s biggest efforts of the 90s was to celebrate the idea of the traditional superhero, at a time when the comics industry was in considerable turmoil Marvel was becoming known for savage characters like Punisher and Venom, and Image was redefining the game by making it, well, all about the image, with none of the original heart Grant Morrison came to define these efforts with his JLA, in which the seven most iconic DC superheroes came together to form the Mount Rush of Justice Lea One of DC s biggest efforts of the 90s was to celebrate the idea of the traditional superhero, at a time when the comics industry was in considerable turmoil Marvel was becoming known for savage characters like Punisher and Venom, and Image was redefining the game by making it, well, all about the image, with none of the original heart Grant Morrison came to define these efforts with his JLA, in which the seven most iconic DC superheroes came together to form the Mount Rush of Justice Leagues But parallel to this, he also cowrote, with Mark Millar, Aztek The Ultimate Man Where JLA existed in a world that ignored the greater comics landscape, Aztek took it on directly, a critique and an attempt to graft the old days on the new The results can be disorienting.The most obvious example of DC s efforts, one that fluctuates in its visibility, was Kingdom Come, in which a violent superhero named Magog has emerged, in the future, as Superman s successor, and leads a whole maniac generation of costumed adventurers apparently free of traditional moral responsibility Eventually Superman returns to set things right, of course Magog himself was inspired by Marvel s Cable since entered the mainstream in Deadpool 2 And like him, Aztek sports a horned mask, as if to say that, at least as far as the 90s were concerned, superheroes now must be warriors And perhaps that was the whole point.But Aztek is no Magog He s an innocent whose trademark gesture is folding his arms across his chest, like Christopher Reeve s Superman You can t really pinpoint any clearer example of the classic Silver Age superhero than Reeve, whose defining quality was innocence in the face of his great power in his second movie appearance he gives up his powers for love, just when he s needed most in his fourth, he solves the nuclear question but in the act unwittingly creates a monster , never fully comprehending the responsibility entrusted in him, despite always doing what he can to help out humanity Superheroes merely do heroic things If faced with a true challenge, they merely keep fighting.Aztek is never so lucky I don t know if it was always part of the story, but eventually he learns not only was his father, as predecessor behind the mask, murdered because he rebelled against the system that set it all up, but Lex Luthor is ultimately responsible for everything he s become, guiding him along to the grand destiny awaiting him This is a Luthor, in the era of The Final Night, in which he actually aides Superman in preventing another apocalypse, somewhere between good and evil There s no trace of Luthor until the later issues, which culminate in Aztek joining the Justice League There might have been a revision there s certainly no resolution in these pages Aztek s whole mission was to defeat a great evil, which doesn t happen in the final issue His story concludes in JLA, just another failed solo series folded into a team book an old clich in superhero comics.But the often bizarre happenings in Aztek itself suggests an experiment intended to operate on its own Morrison s ideas, perhaps, interpreted by Millar, later fully given over to hisextreme impulses, thehe writes his own ideas The ideas Morrison brought to Aztek would ve been right at home in his Doom Patrol In execution, Aztek is not really similar to another JLA era creation, Zauriel, the winged Hawkman stand in who s an actual angel, tormented, in the end,by his love for a human than by his fall from paradise Most of the ideas in Aztek are half formed, even given time to be explored across ten issues None of them coalesce so beautifully In trying to present a Silver Age superhero inviolent times, in constantly tripping up its hero, Aztek never has the time to breathe, never allows the narrative to dwell long enough on itself.That s turned out to be a trademark of Millar s later comics, the penchant to let the setup give way to a breathless series of cliffhangers, designed to dazzle the reader In that sense, Aztek is best understood as a Millar project, perhaps the prototypical Millar project It s a fascinating look at a crossroads in superhero storytelling Like most Morrison stories, it s meant to open a box that s supposed to be closed in its conclusion, which is why Aztek dies in the pages of JLA So maybe it is a better ending for his series, for a superhero learning his way in the world merely to find acceptance among his peers

  7. says:

    Oof This was rough The art was sketchy and unfinished, and it was often difficult to tell characters apart, and the story may have been worse On paper, a Quetzalcoatl themed hero is something I ought to be really excited about, but it really didn t work for me You only found out about much of any of the character s backstory halfway through the trade, as though it were an afterthought, and by then, I was pretty disinterested and only finishing the trade because of my own stubbornness There Oof This was rough The art was sketchy and unfinished, and it was often difficult to tell characters apart, and the story may have been worse On paper, a Quetzalcoatl themed hero is something I ought to be really excited about, but it really didn t work for me You only found out about much of any of the character s backstory halfway through the trade, as though it were an afterthought, and by then, I was pretty disinterested and only finishing the trade because of my own stubbornness There are cameos from various DC superstars, which felt a bit tacked on and only there to ease the transition of this lackluster character into the JLA, I guess I ve seen other books praise this one for the hero having a better heart than other books, but since the villains are all manipulating him because of his naivete, the story still ends up being chock full of ultraviolence, so if you are after something wholesome this isn t it In addition to being bad, it s entirely too long, and changes tone significantly maybe two thirds of the way through The writing gets a bit easier to deal with, and the art is a bitheavy handed, but if doesn t get any better With Grant Morrison s name on this, I had hoped for something really mind bending and thought provoking, and this was just not

  8. says:

    Kind of a mess, but some of those wild Morrison ideas are definitely present The parts I think read like Mark Millar are expectedly crass and pedestrian The over AZ ll concept, design and world building are interesting, but the pacing is weirdly disjointed, and the art is kind of ugly.

  9. says:

    Some interesting ideas in here, and I would love to read where the story goes next but the art was cluttered and confusing.

  10. says:

    What a shame that this only lasted for ten issues Self aware, clever, unique, and very funny.

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