كيف تكسب السعادة



❴PDF / Epub❵ ★ كيف تكسب السعادة Author Bertrand Russell – E17streets4all.co.uk The Conquest of Happiness is Bertrand Russell s recipe for good living First published in , it pre dates the current obsession with self help by decades Leading the reader step by step through the cau The Conquest of Happiness is Bertrand Russell s recipe for good living First published in , it pre dates the current obsession كيف تكسب PDF/EPUB or with self help by decades Leading the reader step by step through the causes of unhappiness and the personal choices, compromises and sacrifices that may lead to the final, affirmative conclusion of The Happy Man , this is popular philosophy, or even self help, as it should be written.كيف تكسب السعادة

Bertrand Arthur William Russell, rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, was a Welsh philosopher, historian, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, pacifist, and كيف تكسب PDF/EPUB or prominent rationalist Although he was usually regarded as English, as he spent the majority of his life in England, he was born in Wales, where he also diedHe was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in in recognition of his varied and significant writings in which he champions humanitarian ideals and freedom of thought.

كيف تكسب السعادة ePUB ½ كيف تكسب
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  • Hardcover
  • كيف تكسب السعادة
  • Bertrand Russell
  • Arabic
  • 10 September 2018

10 thoughts on “كيف تكسب السعادة

  1. says:

    In adolescence, I hated life and was continually on the verge of suicide, from which, however, I was restrained by the desire to knowmathematics Now, on the contrary, I enjoy life I might almost say that with every year that passes I enjoy itLike many people, I suspect, I find Russell an extremely agreeable person And though he is, no doubt, several orders of magnitude cleverer than I am, I still identify very strongly with him Perhaps this is only wishful thinking, but the mIn adolescence, I hated life and was continually on the verge of suicide, from which, however, I was restrained by the desire to knowmathematics Now, on the contrary, I enjoy life I might almost say that with every year that passes I enjoy itLike many people, I suspect, I find Russell an extremely agreeable person And though he is, no doubt, several orders of magnitude cleverer than I am, I still identify very strongly with him Perhaps this is only wishful thinking, but theI read Russell, theI find that, in outlook and temperament, I am rather similar to the man apart from his aristocratic English manners, of course Thus it was a pleasure to read his views on what makes for a happy life, as almost everything he said resonated very strongly with me Russell s aim is to examine not extraordinary grief or mourning or tragedy, but the usual sort of unhappiness that Thoreau meant when he said The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation And Russell s message boils down to something simple happiness comes from taking a genuine interest in the world, and unhappiness consists in spending too much time thinking about oneself and one s problems Here is a simple example If, on my walk back from work, I run into my neighbor, who then proceeds to tell me for the umpteenth time about his recent hunting trip, I can choose to see it as an imposition on myself, a needless waste of my time, a sign of this man s stupidity, and finally as a part of a general decline in good manners and good taste Or I can, with any luck, choose to see it as an amusing foible, as a window into another person s life, or at the very least as something absolutely trivial and not worth fussing about The difference is that the first is self centered andthan a bit unrealistic, while in the second scenario my attention is directed outwards and I maintain a sense of perspective Russell fills up a book by exploring this idea from a variety of angles What are the emotions that focus our attention inward and cause us to lose our perspective and our zest for life Envy, greed, guilt, ruthless competitiveness, the need for approval, fear of public opinion To combat these pulls, Russell recommends ways to constantly remind ourselves that we aren t, in fact, the center of the universe, and the world around us is not some backdrop for our problems or an obstacle in the way, but is rather extremely interesting and a good dealimportant than our own lives One of Russell s key strategies is to take an interest in things that have no practical benefit to us Simple as this sounds, many don t seem to understand this lesson It always strikes me as bizarre and shortsighted when someone says, Why should I learn about this It doesn t affect me in any way Will this ever be useful But isn t this the point Learning about wildflowers, for example, is relaxing because you won t have to rely on this knowledge to pass an exam or to get a paycheck it s a relief from your usual cares, and one that, besides, enriches your experience of the world And not only does learning about wildflowers enrich your experience, but it also reminds you that there s an entire region of reality one that people have devoted their lives to that will be completely unaffected if you go bankrupt tomorrow Isn t that a nice thought In some places, this book shows its age Russell speaks of women in ways that would probably get him tarred and feathered now though, to be fair, at the time he was considered extremely progressive At another point, Russell partly blames the growing unhappiness of women on the decline in good domestic service Yet these bits are easy to ignore and forgive and much of the book still feels relevant Russell is particularly good on envy, competitiveness, and workaholism These three very prevalent here in New York City are deeply intertwined So many people and I am not excluded from this make themselves miserable by thinking about all the nice things happening to everyone else, all the money their cousin is making who s not, after all, any smarter than me , and all the luck that some people seem to have They look in the mirror and think about the handsomer fellow on television they receive their paycheck and think about how much their boss must make This has been exacerbated by social media, but is, I think, something we all must deal with, especially in a capitalistic society where, ostensibly at least, your social position is determined by your own merit The dark side of living in a supposed meritocracy is that people at the bottom or even comfortably in the middle feel that they are failures for not reaching the top which is obviously absurd, especially if you realize that the people at the top most likely aren t any happier than you are Thinking about yourself purely in relation to others leads directly to a certain amount of competitiveness many people struggle, not to attain something they need, but simply to win a race against their peers This is the cause of obsessive working Now don t get me wrong, there s nothing wrong with working, and working hard, but some people have completely lost a sense of perspective In fact, I recently read a piece by someone who had spent his life in advertising Lind Redding was his name who detailed this very phenomenon after he was diagnosed with cancer and started looking back on his working life After working furiously for decades, he concluded that, after all, he was only trying to make advertisements, so why on earth had he spent so many stressful hours at the office rather than at home This has happened to me, though on a much smaller scale, when I have been convinced that what I was working on was terribly important and that the consequences for not doing it perfectly would be disastrous when, in reality, what I was doing was of no importance and the consequences of doing it imperfectly would be nonexistent A proper sense of perspective would have helped me avoid this, for I would realize that other people s success doesn t make me a failure, that I havethan I need already, that my task is a very minor event in the universe, and that the earth won t detonate if every detail isn t just right Or at least, I hope it won t I m getting a bit carried away To return to the book, Russell, with his usually acute mind, tackles this trouble, among others, offering friendly advice on how to avoid it and to maintain a mental balance And lucky for the reader, Russell s advice is usually summed up in wonderful epigrams that sparkle with good natured wit I constantly found myself highlighting sentences in this book, as I read in continuous astonishment at Russell s skill with the pen His style is neither flashy nor even conspicuous he uses no tricks, no elaborate metaphors, no high flown words Yet every time I read Russell, I find myself filled with envy at his writing ability I think it s criminal that there should be someone so much better than I am Russell would, of course, remind me that after all there will always be someone who s a better writer than I am, and that his prose should be appreciated as a gift rather than considered as a reproach to my own Now, how do you argue with a person like that

  2. says:

    I had my doubts how can a privileged white, male philosopher tell me, a modern day female minority about the conquest of happiness via a book that was written before my dad was born How could we possibly have anything in common Color me surprised It s striking how relevant his writing is, to our society today.I started reading this book after a stressful year in my life where I got too caught up with feelings of anxiety and lack of achievement despite working hard most days I will not go th I had my doubts how can a privileged white, male philosopher tell me, a modern day female minority about the conquest of happiness via a book that was written before my dad was born How could we possibly have anything in common Color me surprised It s striking how relevant his writing is, to our society today.I started reading this book after a stressful year in my life where I got too caught up with feelings of anxiety and lack of achievement despite working hard most days I will not go through the gory details because I doubt they will be relatable or useful to anyone, but nothing that I did or read during that year helped till this book arrived I needed a why , and this book gave me an answer to that, and to how.Keep in mind that this book is not going to be helpful to anyone who suffers from real tragedy or grief, it s simply meant to be used as a framework to understanding why you are unhappy despite having a semi comfortable life Which I think applies to most people who are capable of reading for leisure Russell starts out with declaring that most of your unhappiness stems from a preoccupation with yourself and a lack of genuine interest with the external objects The book is divided into two main parts Causes of unhappiness, and causes of happiness I found the first part to be most insightful because I suffered from every, single, cause, that he mentioned, to some degree CAUSES OF UNHAPPINESS1 Byronic Unhappiness I frequently attributed some of my sorrows to how devastatingly bad and evil the world can be 2 Competition Competitive success is too dearly purchased if you sacrifice all other ingredients to happiness in order to obtain it It s also damaging in the sense that success should not be represented as the purpose of life, since after obtaining it, you re bound to fall prey to boredom and listlessness because you do not know what to do with it so you occupy yourself with makingsuccess It s a harmful cycle.3 Boredom and Excitement It s true that we are less bored than our ancestors were, but we areterrified of being bored A life full of excitement is not to be desired since it is exhausting and a certain amount of boredom and inactivity is required in order for you to be able to achieve the important things in your life No great achievement is possible without persistent work A certain power of enduring boredom is essential to a happy life.4 Fatigue Probably my favorite chapter in the book I highlighted all of it.5 Envy.6 The Sense of Sin Speaks about what it really means to have your conscience prick you.7 Persecution Mania It s very easy to fall prey to this mania in a world where you see people getting ahead not based on merit alone, and when you are too preoccupied with yourself.8 Fear of Public Opinion One should as a rule respect public opinion in so far as is necessary to avoid starvation and keep out prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny I found this chapter incredibly insightful.I cannot believe how underrated this book is I mean, it is true, that it s speckled with classist remarks and an abundance of gender stereotypes roles but it was the 1930 s it s quite remarkable and depressing how close it is Saudi Arabia s 2017 But, please, do not dismiss this book because of it Recommended

  3. says:

    I was so excited to read this book, because I love Bertrand Russell I still love Bertrand Russell It s just too bad that his view of humanity is so narrow minded in this work His descriptions of people, of society make you go whaaaaat , and while it could be chalked up to the fact that it was written nearly eighty years ago, I think there sto it Russell displayed enormous depth and understanding when he wrote A History of Western Philosophy a decade later, and I think time really i I was so excited to read this book, because I love Bertrand Russell I still love Bertrand Russell It s just too bad that his view of humanity is so narrow minded in this work His descriptions of people, of society make you go whaaaaat , and while it could be chalked up to the fact that it was written nearly eighty years ago, I think there sto it Russell displayed enormous depth and understanding when he wrote A History of Western Philosophy a decade later, and I think time really improved his capacity for forgiveness and imagination The truth is, The Conquest of Happiness is a self righteous book which displays little insight into human behavior There are phrases which simply made me cringe colored people are happier by nature a buh women are merely vessels of bottled up antagonism towards better dressed members of the gender thanks, but I ll pass on that analysis Like I said, I still enjoy a lot of Russell I think he himself is aware of his faulty reasoning, and you can see that when he says This issue goes beyond what I can say here or I m loathe to talk like a mystic, but I have to here It would have been a better book if he d paidattention to those urges Go ahead and read it because it does tell us a lot about the author s progression as a person, and it does have good insights at points, but I d recommend Simone Weil or Erich Fromm or Hazrat Khan or Aldous Huxley or Paul Tillich or many others forfruitful reading hey Russell Some women care aboutthan their clothes Check out Simone Weil who was fighting the fascists while you were only smoking your pipe and talking about the working class Also, it s really fascinating that he wrote this book when he himself was miserable and needed some money Should be kept in mind

  4. says:

    I first read its second hand hardcover 1930 bought at the National Book Fair XXXVI in Bangkok in 2008 and found Russell s views on happiness practical and witty Russell famously wrote so clearly and contributively to the world that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1950 another similar case is, I think, Sir Winston Churchill , therefore, his writing style is still worth studying and applying in one s narration.Let me show you some interesting quotes from this book published by I first read its second hand hardcover 1930 bought at the National Book Fair XXXVI in Bangkok in 2008 and found Russell s views on happiness practical and witty Russell famously wrote so clearly and contributively to the world that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1950 another similar case is, I think, Sir Winston Churchill , therefore, his writing style is still worth studying and applying in one s narration.Let me show you some interesting quotes from this book published by Routledge 2006 No one is surprised to find an eminent general or admiral poor indeed poverty in such circumstances is, in a sense, itself an honor p 30 A certain power of enduring boredom is therefore essential to a happy life, and isof the things that ought to be taught to the young p 39 Whoever wishes to increase human happiness must wish to increase admiration and to diminish envy p 56 The secret of happiness is this let your interests be as wide as possible, and let your reactions to the things and persons that interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile p 109 Find one to read and you will understand why this book is still inspiring from one of the eminent philosophers in the 20th century

  5. says:

    Some great advice from Bertrand Russell,for the conquest of happiness.But first he looks at the causes of unhappiness.The social system creates war,economic exploitation and unequal opportunities for individuals.Unhappy people have mistaken habits,ethics and views of the world.A lot of self absorption,brooding and loneliness creates what he calls byronic unhappiness Many people don t have the zest required for happiness.Competition,fatigue and boredom also create unhappiness.Envy is an even mo Some great advice from Bertrand Russell,for the conquest of happiness.But first he looks at the causes of unhappiness.The social system creates war,economic exploitation and unequal opportunities for individuals.Unhappy people have mistaken habits,ethics and views of the world.A lot of self absorption,brooding and loneliness creates what he calls byronic unhappiness Many people don t have the zest required for happiness.Competition,fatigue and boredom also create unhappiness.Envy is an evenpowerful cause of unhappiness.Fear of what others think of one s actions is detrimental too.The sense of sin can lead to a lot of unease.Some people may find his idea of sin controversial I remember that this chapter had been excluded from text books in Pakistan.Russell s views on this subject were unconventional,anyway.For happiness,Russell stresses the need for having zest for life and developing a wide range of interests including impersonal ones which can release stress.A good family life is vital,an individual needs love and affection.One needs effort and constructive engagement in one s work.If work is not excessive,even the dullest work is better than idleness.Another important thing is resignation,not worrying about the things that can t be attained.Russell even has a remedy for the fear of death,having children,through whom one can live on,in his view.However,I doubt if having children is as unmitigated a blessing as he makes it sound.And what if there are no children How does an individual live on then These then are Russell s thoughts,which an individual with average fortune may find helpful.Really bad fortune Russell does not talk about that

  6. says:

    One should respect public opinion insofar as is necessary to avoid starvation and keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny.Bertrand Russel, cheery scientist and one of the greatest minds and personalities of the era, explains his take on human happiness and what keeps most of us from it most of the time He explains this from a purely rational and non theistic perspective, taking nothing for granted This is NOT a self help book, bu One should respect public opinion insofar as is necessary to avoid starvation and keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny.Bertrand Russel, cheery scientist and one of the greatest minds and personalities of the era, explains his take on human happiness and what keeps most of us from it most of the time He explains this from a purely rational and non theistic perspective, taking nothing for granted This is NOT a self help book, but rather a survey of the helpful and unhelpful aspects Russel sees in human nature and modern culture, and suggestions on how one might cope with it It s written by a British gentleman in the 1920 s, so the language is a bit stilted, and his mention of things like the Servant Problem might fall on deaf ears to the modern reader, but this book is full of gems

  7. says:

    Russell was very right to title this quintessential self help book with the word conquest , since happiness is hardly a thing that emanates from the heavens down to your precious soul unfortunately, the opposite view has held sway for a couple thousand years Consequently, many average people do as they re told, expecting happiness to come to them if they are obedient, i.e., enjoy mainstream media, conform one s behavior to outside groups, etc Yet, everything of human worth is precisely outs Russell was very right to title this quintessential self help book with the word conquest , since happiness is hardly a thing that emanates from the heavens down to your precious soul unfortunately, the opposite view has held sway for a couple thousand years Consequently, many average people do as they re told, expecting happiness to come to them if they are obedient, i.e., enjoy mainstream media, conform one s behavior to outside groups, etc Yet, everything of human worth is precisely outside of mainstream media and conventional behavior hence, there must be some conquest certainly Russell and Nietzsche s views on power coincide somewhere in the noumenal realm One must struggle for culture in a society infected with Christian values this was exactly the predicament of Europe coming out of the Middle Ages people struggled to acquire culture Greek, Golden Age Latin and this was what lifted humanity out of medieval depression In the same way, modernity must struggle again, out of pop ideological hegemonic culture, out of industrial malaise Partly, this is a political, but also a psychological struggle The Buddha once noted that the thoughts of today are the seedbed for the thoughts of tomorrow similarly, Russell notes the importance of training one s unconscious thoughts, to carefully reason out one s worries, and not to suppress them Suppressing them is bound to give one a sense of unease, an unease that quickly leads to boredom, and boredom is, Russell says, easily responsible for most of the atrocities in history as Dostoyevsky s Underground Man notes, Cleopatra pierced her slave with her brooch simply for the fun of it While the political and psychological struggles are perhaps one and the same, and while the boredom that produces unhappiness will persist as long as there is meaningless economic activity service industries , Russell gives the reader an important sense of responsibility for one s own degree of happiness in a world that provides, if one is truthful, no end for interest in it

  8. says:

    I had to keep in mind that this book was written in 1930 by man who lived within the confines of the privileged class of white privilege If I hadn t kept that in mind the racism and sexism would have made this book intolerable I had to grit my teeth and move along at times.I m not sure Russell could write this book today, even without the racism sexism It would probaly be better suited in 2013 to a blog than a book He goes through all the of the reasons he sees for unhappiness and then throu I had to keep in mind that this book was written in 1930 by man who lived within the confines of the privileged class of white privilege If I hadn t kept that in mind the racism and sexism would have made this book intolerable I had to grit my teeth and move along at times.I m not sure Russell could write this book today, even without the racism sexism It would probaly be better suited in 2013 to a blog than a book He goes through all the of the reasons he sees for unhappiness and then through all the causes of happiness He never backs up any of his ideas with any real datahe just throws out generalizations The reader is expected to take his word for it.And yetin each chapter he hits on truth Take this for example Each of us is in the world for no very long time, and within the few years of his life has to acquire whatever he is to know of this strange planet and its place in the universe To ignore our oppotunities for knowledge, imperfect as they are, is like going to the theater and not listening to the play The world is full things that are tragic or comic, heroic or bizarre or surprising, and those who fail to become interested in the spectacle that it offers are forgoing one of the privileges that life has to offer Yes I saw so many people I know in the pages of this book, both good and bad His insight into the human psyche is remarkable I m not sure if I learned anything newbut it certainly helped give voice to ideas about living a happy life that I already know It s a interesting readbut I would hesitate before recommending it to anyone

  9. says:

    A transcendent experience, I could relate so much, it was like looking into the mirror, it called to me A genuine book, calling it a self help book wouldn t do it justice.I don t know what happiness is, but Russell sure has taught me how to get there His methods and views were so understandable, his logic irrefutable Being a man of Science, his observations remain so accurate, I was blown away I loved his observations about people in Science, they seemed so close to the truth A Mathematicia A transcendent experience, I could relate so much, it was like looking into the mirror, it called to me A genuine book, calling it a self help book wouldn t do it justice.I don t know what happiness is, but Russell sure has taught me how to get there His methods and views were so understandable, his logic irrefutable Being a man of Science, his observations remain so accurate, I was blown away I loved his observations about people in Science, they seemed so close to the truth A Mathematician myself, I could not help being exceedingly impressed All the conditions of happiness are realized in the life of the man of science It is a compact book He has written this book for the average modern man having the ordinary modern problems in the easiest, relevant and the most concise way.I loved the preface which directs to what kind of people and what kind of problems the book is going to address also mentioned throughout the book to avoid digression for the benefit of the reader.Though at sometimes dated the book is very apt, written with scientific accuracy Myself, seeking genuine lasting happiness and distrustful of people, professionals, and even literature, the book didn t seem shallow, phony or deceiving even once I agreed with most of what Russell said He pointed me in the right direction I understood all he said He was very open, serene and calculated.The book is divided into two parts, Causes of Unhappiness and Causes of Happiness, I loved both in their own ways but the first part .The first chapter was sensational, I loved it when Russell gave his own example of being unhappy, I was not born happy As a child, my favourite hymn was Weary of earth and laden with my sin At the age of five, I reflected that, if I should live to be seventy, I had only endured, so far, a fourteenth part of my whole life, and I felt the long spread out boredom ahead of me to be almost unendurable In adolescence, I hated life and was continually on the verge of suicide, from which, however, I was restrained by the desire to knowmathematics Now, on the contrary, I enjoy life I might almost say that with every year that passes I enjoy itThis is due partly to having discovered that were the things that I most desired, and having gradually acquired many of these things Partly it is due to having successfully dismissed certain objects of desire such as the acquisition of indubitable knowledge about something or other as essentially unattainable But very largely it is due to a diminishing preoccupation with myself. He suggests an interesting technique of reaching the unconscious through the conscious like the unconscious directs the conscious Another useful technique is attacking a problem by giving it thought from all different angles and then putting it out of your mind until the occasion arises for you to do something about it.He strives to abolish self centredness which, according to him, that s the main source of our problems He says should be occupied by the right kind and the right amount of work to be happy He talks about the zest of life which we find wanting I loved his bit about envy, it was so accurate and I think he reached the same solution that I have, i.e., trying to go out your way to praise such people and thus being genuinely happy for them Whoever wishes to increase human happiness must wish to increase admiration and to diminish envy. p 85 I cannot agreewith his thoughts about the leg pulling competitiveness, the need, and fear of public approval, and workaholism, the absence of which can be unhealthy, but of which is too much in the world One should respect public opinion insofar as is necessary to avoid starvation and keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny. Russell reminds us that we are not as important and people care and think about us much less than we think, the world doesn t revolve around us and especially that no one is out there to get you He stressed that boredom is a necessary part of life and we should not deplete our faculties trying to keep our life interesting all the time He tells us to look outside of ourselves, find enjoyment in our lives through eclectic interests and seek happiness The secret of happiness is very simply this let your interests be as wide as possible, and let your reactions to the things and persons that interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile The part about domestic and individual happiness appeals to me and gives me hope in this everdivided world I loved his thoughts about love and family and children, Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness.consider the difference between love and mere sex attraction Love is an experience in which our whole being is renewed and refreshed as is that of plants by rain after drought In sex intercourse without love there is nothing of this When the momentary pleasure is ended, there is fatigue, disgust, and a sense that life is hollow Love is part of the life of Earth sex without love is not. All these things are necessary to an individual s happiness Most of all, he declares ourselves being responsible for our happiness or unhappiness.Russell gives a very clear path to the acquirement of happiness I really should read it one timeto truly absorb all the information Though not so sure about the conquest but this book was my search for happiness while trying to understand the human condition

  10. says:

    In this little book, philosopher Bertrand Russell aimed at bringing across a very important message to the general public happiness is both attainable and socially beneficial Since it s a book aimed at the general public, it s not a tightly knit philosophical discussion although even these are a pleasure to read in the case of Russell So, don t expect to find any academic distinctions or clear definitions Yet, since Russell was versed in mathematics, philosophy and science, he draws heavil In this little book, philosopher Bertrand Russell aimed at bringing across a very important message to the general public happiness is both attainable and socially beneficial Since it s a book aimed at the general public, it s not a tightly knit philosophical discussion although even these are a pleasure to read in the case of Russell So, don t expect to find any academic distinctions or clear definitions Yet, since Russell was versed in mathematics, philosophy and science, he draws heavily from scientific insights for example, on education of the young, etc.The main thesis of the book is basically Spinoza for laypeople Spinoza claimed that happiness lies in the realization of both your own cosmic insignificance and your fundamental unity with the universe Russell holds a similar view a happy life is the life of someone who is affectionately occupied with people and things Or, inphilosophical jargon happiness is a subject that is occupied with objects This is an important claim, since it immediately does away with all the self help guru s, myth, self deception and religion A subject should not be occupied with itself this is the road to an unhappy life.Actually, self absorption is the main cause of unhappiness It comes in many forms and guises, ranging from sense of sin to self aggrandizement, and from self destruction to inferiority complex What all these states of unhappiness have in common is a sickly obsession of the individual with himself Yet, Russell acknowledges modern living is offering us manypotential environmental triggers to cause unhappiness, compared to earlier times This is because most people are not born rich, are not especially gifted, and are not equipped with a natural inclination towards happiness.For most of us, happiness is a conquest That is, we have to put in effort, sometimes years, to be a happy person This is because, happiness is both the product of environmental and intellectual causes Although Russell only treats the latter, he does recognizes and sometimes touches on social factors such as economic despair, institutions such as marriage and religion, and threats stemming from political causes The key is to be aware at all times of what is in your sphere of control and what not, and to learn not to intellectualize the things that are out of your reach Even the things in your control should not be related to self in overabundance it is important to make the best decisions and this requires some rumination, yet once decided we should only learn from the consequences and not fret on them Most unhappy people are unhappy as the result of escapism If they re not suffering from any psychopathology, some bad things happened to them, and in response to this they retreated inward In short unhappy people have closed themselves off from the world This introversion can manifest itself in pure hate towards humanity, towards the universe, whatnot , self destruction through alcohol and drugs, for example , self aggrandizement dominating others, viewing them as means, not ends , feelings of inferiority, etc Most of these types of introversion lead to vicious cycles of self destruction the person suffering feelings of despair and inferiority seeks to escape these thoughts by stopping thought altogether, for example through the use of alcohol This, then, leads to even worse feelings of self, leading tohate towards the world andescapismThe man in whom one desire runs to excess at the expense of all others is usually a man with some deepseated trouble, who is seeking escape from a specter In the case of the dipsomaniac this is obvious men drink in order to forget If they had no specters in their lives, they would not find drunkennessagreeable than sobriety As the legendary Chinaman said Me no drinkee for drinkee, me drinkee for drunkee This is typical of all excessive and one sided passions It is not pleasure in the object itself that is sought, but oblivion The treatment in all of these situations is twofold First, one should occupy oneself with some objects and parallel to diagnose oneself, to get to the truth about oneself and face this pain Next, one should keep aiming at objects outside oneself and parallel to this steadily, consciously, eliminate these pains This last is done through putting the painful things in perspective, for example by reading books on history or astronomy or by relating them to other, less painful events, preferable related to other persons In other words one should learn to realize that his or her problems are insignificant in the grand scheme of things, and this is done through consciously overriding the thought patterns that have been laid down in the unconscious over the years The most important point this takes time and effort, and should not be done on purpose but always parallel to objective aims a new hobby, a new relation, etc I have stated Russell s thesis of conquering happiness mostly in negative terms, since this resonateswith my own current situation His treatment of causes that make for unhappy living hit home harder than his treatment of causes that make for happy living It s also the first part of the book, so perhaps it s a combination of both And lastly, it is as Russell himself claims who was in his youth not the most happiest one himself perhaps the most important side of the thesis because modern society offers so many causes of unhappiness and despair and simultaneously so many routes of escape But it is, of course, muchhelpful to state in positive terms what Russell proposes A happy life is a life in which one is affectionately involved with persons and things Sincerely loving others, especially partner and family, sincerely pursuing your irrelevant interests and hobby s, having a job that offers you a platform to hone your skills and improve yourself, and, perhaps most importantly, sincerely not being occupied with yourself Of course, there are the usual necessary requirements food, drink, shelter, etc but these are mostly the products of the causes that make for a happy life Zest in everything you do is key to be happy, one has to be a citizen of the universe The book is one of the most profound works I ve read by Russell The reason is its sheer simplicity which is a beautiful thing to experience and also I imagine one of the hardest things to create as an author The main thing I take away from this book is the need for brutally honest self diagnosis that is, viewing current unhappiness as the result of underlying causes, and investigating these causes and the events that triggered them Although this sounds like an algorithm for psychoanalysis of the self, it really isn t It s applying reason to your own life For example, I am prone to feelings of self pity, self destruction, and in general feeling a lack of being part of the world This leads to a lack of zest i.e losing all interest in worldly things , never ending rumination, escapism e.g binge watching tv series , and whatnot Through reading Russell, I realize how self obsessed I ve become over the past couple of years, and how this keeps me unhappy only strengthening the feedback loop The trick, for me, is 1 through learning how I am keeping myself unhappy through these negative affections, gradually overriding these unconscious psychological patterns and 2 to reflect on who I am as person in the sense of what I value in life and what interests me , and subsequently start pursuingreciprocal relations with people andgenuine interests.I didn t read this work with the aim of improving my own life I reject self help books but the common sense underlying Russell s claims is so obvious and resonates to such a degree, that this little book inspired me to start making a turn in life For this, I m grateful to Bertrand Russell without knowing him, I imagine him as one of the most likeable and charming people I ve readHappiness is not, except in very rare cases, something that drops into the mouth, like a ripe fruit, by the mere operation of fortunate circumstances That is why I have called this book The Conquest of Happiness For in a world so full of avoidable and unavoidable misfortunes, of illness and psychological tangles, of struggle and poverty and ill will, the man or woman who is to be happy must find ways of coping with the multitudinous causes of unhappiness by which each individual is assailed

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