In een Duits pension



➸ In een Duits pension Free ➮ Author Katherine Mansfield – E17streets4all.co.uk Rich, psychologically probing stories Germans at Meat, The Baron, The Modern Soul, The Advanced Lady and nine others Rich, psychologically probing stories Germans at Meat, The Baron, The Modern Soul, The Advanced Lady and nine others.In een Duits pension

Kathleen Mansfield Murry n e Beauchamp was a prominent New Zealand modernist writer of short fiction who wrote under the pen name of Katherine MansfieldKatherine Mansfield is widely considered one of the best short story writers of her period A number of her works, including Miss Brill , Prelude , The Garden Party , The Doll In een Epub / s House , and later works such as The Fly , are frequently collected in short story anthologies Mansfield also proved ahead of her time in her adoration of Russian playwright and short story writer Anton Chekhov, and incorporated some of his themes and techniques into her writingKatherine Mansfield was part of a new dawn in English literature with T S Eliot, James Joyce and Virginia Woolf She was associated with the brilliant group of writers who made the London of the period the centre of the literary worldNevertheless, Mansfield was a New Zealand writer she could not have written as she did had she not gone to live in England and France, but she could not have done her best work if she had not had firm roots in her native land She used her memories in her writing from the beginning, people, the places, even the colloquial speech of the country form the fabric of much of her best workMansfield s stories were the first of significance in English to be written without a conventional plot Supplanting the strictly structured plots of her predecessors in the genre Edgar Allan Poe, Rudyard Kipling, H G Wells , Mansfield concentrated on one moment, a crisis or a turning point, rather than on a sequence of events The plot is secondary to mood and characters The stories are innovative in many other ways They feature simple things a doll s house or a charwoman Her imagery, frequently from nature, flowers, wind and colours, set the scene with which readers can identify easilyThemes too are universal human isolation, the questioning of traditional roles of men and women in society, the conflict between love and disillusionment, idealism and reality, beauty and ugliness, joy and suffering, and the inevitability of these paradoxes Oblique narration influenced by Chekhov but certainly developed by Mansfield includes the use of symbolism the doll s house lamp, the fly, the pear tree hinting at the hidden layers of meaning Suggestion and implication replace direct detail.

In een Duits pension PDF ß In een  Epub /
  • Paperback
  • 135 pages
  • In een Duits pension
  • Katherine Mansfield
  • Dutch
  • 08 April 2019
  • 9065510753 Edition Language Dutch Other Editions 78

10 thoughts on “In een Duits pension

  1. says:

    Short stories can be like photographs, catching people at some moment in their lives and trapping the memory for ever There they are, smiling or frowning, looking sad, happy, serious, surprised And behind those smiles and those frowns lie all the experience of life, the fears and delights, the hopes and the dreams Katherine MansfieldLast year, I was enraptured by a collection of Katherine Mansfield s short stories, Something Childish But Very Natural so while reading Willem Elsschot s Vi Short stories can be like photographs, catching people at some moment in their lives and trapping the memory for ever There they are, smiling or frowning, looking sad, happy, serious, surprised And behind those smiles and those frowns lie all the experience of life, the fears and delights, the hopes and the dreams Katherine MansfieldLast year, I was enraptured by a collection of Katherine Mansfield s short stories, Something Childish But Very Natural so while reading Willem Elsschot s Villa des Roses, written around the same time and also set in a boarding house, Mansfield s debut collection from 1911, In a German Pension popped up from some hidden corner of the mental bookshelf For these pension stories, Mansfield took inspiration from her own stay as a cure guest in Villa Pension M ller at a Bavarian spa of Bad W rishofen in 1909, send off there by her mother to muffle her extramarital pregnancy which would end in a miscarriage With demonic zest Mansfield s sharp witted and observant narrator, a young English woman, looks at the peculiarities and behaviour of the pension guests, many of them at the spa on account of their nerves , trenchantly depicting the gross and distasteful table manners of the German pensioners, picking teeth with a hairpin, overeating, cleaning ears with a napkin, talking about saliva, spitting cherry stones in public, repugnantly displaying the use of handkerchiefs The narrator s bantering commentary on the boarders preoccupancy with bodily functions and digestion and their unctuous attitudes is mirrored by the depreciatory and spiteful opinion which the German guests confide to the narrator vis vis the odd manners of the EnglishIt is a great pity the English nation is so unmusical I have never been to England , interrupted Fr ulein Sonia, but I have many English acquaintances They are so cold She shivered Fish blooded , snapped Frau Godowska, Without soul, without soul, without grace But you cannot equal their dress materials England is merely an island of beef flesh swimming in a warm gulf sea of gravy She was like a young tree whose branches had never been touched by the ruthless hand of man Such delicacy Of course it is difficult for you English to understand when you are always exposing your legs on cricket fields, and breeding dogs in your back gardens The pity of it Youth should be like a wild rose For myself, I do not understand how your women ever get married at allAfter all, one ought not forget WWI is hovering over some of these stories, and Mansfield astutely bares the stereotyping in the hearts and minds of her coevals, speaking their minds openly, some lines alluding to the oncoming conflictI suppose you are frightened of an invasion too, eh Oh, that s good I ve been reading all about your English play in a newspaper Did you see it Yes I sat upright I assure you we are not afraid Well then, you ought to be, said the Herr Rat You have got no army at all a few little boys with their veins full of nicotine poisoning Don t be afraid, Herr Hoffmann said We don t want England If we did we would have had her long ago We really do not want you We certainly do not want Germany, I said. Germans at Meat.Fairly light hearted and jocular as long as the pension guests are concerned, the tone and themes of the stories gradually darken, and angst, even tragedy enter The few stories that do not focus an on the pension guests but on the villagers convey pictures of quotidian domestic cruelty, reminding us that barbarism begins at home, touching upon the deplorable plight of womanhood, the discomfiture of childbirth, the imbalance of power in the institution of marriage and its subsequent violence and exploitation and the sexual and social oppression of women and girls Lofty musings on conformist femininity and love are exposed as fibbing and lampooned Whom then, asked Fr ulein Elsa, looking adoringly at the Advanced Lady whom then do you consider the true woman She is the incarnation of comprehending Love But Love is not a question of lavishing , said the Advanced Lady It is the lamp carried in the bosom touching with serene rays all the heights and depths of Darkest Africa, I murmured flippantly. The Advanced Lady The swing of the PendulumNonetheless men and women alike get a good dressing down by Mansfield s barbed pen, men are repulsively unhygienic and egocentric, women coquettish and wanton, like in the last two stories portraying the female protagonists as cold hearted and calculative temptresses, taking umbrage at the men eventually succumbing to their frivolous games, like the allumeuse in Blaze when confronted with the consequences of displaying her ambivalent natureI can t help seeking admiration anythan a cat can help going to people to be strokedDepicting Germans as boorish and self righteous, English women as silly sporty moos unlikely finding or keeping husbands and having procreation issues in some sense reflecting her own Mansfield s sardonic blow up of the mutual tribal biases are far from political correct if that anachronism would make any sense in the context of these tales with its irresistible vitriolicism my children found me chuckling aloud As immature Mansfield might have considered this debut herself, a work of juvenilia that she refused to have republished during her lifetime, the stories are in spurts hilarious in their hyperbolism and razor sharp observations, stunningly precise and incisive in its details, rich in themes and worded in effervescent and sensuous prose, full of life Some of the stories might be less subtle and slightlypredictable than what she will write later in her so brief a life, or have not the delightful open endedness that will characterize later stories, to me this collection was sheer delight At the head of the centre table sat the bride and bridegroom, she in a white dress trimmed with stripes and bows of coloured ribbon, giving her appearance of an iced cake all ready to be cut and served in neat little pieces to the bridegroom beside her, who wore a suit of white clothes much too large for him and a white silk tie that rose half way up his collarFrau Brechenmacher Attends a Wedding The oil paintings are from the New Zealand artist Susan Wilson, who illustrated Katherine Mansfield s short stories for The Folio Society in 2000

  2. says:

    There was a time when I had lost all interest in Jane Austen, resigned to accepting the self assured utterances of a few male acquaintances who still continue to believe that she wrote nothing other than classical chick lit My ignorant, younger self hadn t thought of asking them what was wrong with chick lit in the first place But a reading of

  3. says:

    This is Mansfield s first published collection of short stories, and it comes from her experiences during her short time in Germany prior to 1906 She called it immature , but you can see the promise of things to come in this collection One story alone, The child who was tired, makes it worth reading This is Mansfield s first published collection of short stories, and it comes from her experiences during her short time in Germany prior to 1906 She called it immature , but you can see the promise of things to come in this collection One story alone, The child who was tired, makes it worth reading

  4. says:

    Katherine Mansfield would ve matured to be an amazing writer if she hadn t died at the age of 34 of tuberculosis which quite possibly was another of the knock on effects of the gonorrhoea she contracted from her Polish lover Florian Sobieniowski Was it worth it, Katherine Ladies, beware of men who haveconsonants in their names that seems reasonable I know all that from the introduction to my Penguin edition written by Anne Fernihough an Katherine Mansfield would ve matured to be an amazing writer if she hadn t died at the age of 34 of tuberculosis which quite possibly was another of the knock on effects of the gonorrhoea she contracted from her Polish lover Florian Sobieniowski Was it worth it, Katherine Ladies, beware of men who haveconsonants in their names that seems reasonable I know all that from the introduction to my Penguin edition written by Anne Fernihough an introduction that was rather dense and scholarly Too late did I realise that Hesperus produced a very pretty edition of In a German Pension with an introduction by Linda Grant I bet that one didn t have moronic footnotes that explained who Wagner or Mozart were a famous Austrian composer, apparently I m trying to imagine a world in which someone who has never heard of Mozart reads Katherine Mansfield s obscure short stories.Stories collected in this volume are semi autobiographical because Mansfield herself was sent away to a German pension for a cure her affliction being getting pregnant outside of wedlock Her semi autobiographical narrator is stuck in the pension where she is surrounded by crass idiots She vents her anger by writing sharply satirical portraits of them This all is something I could very much relate to because I am, also, often angry and surrounded by idiots.The stories, of course, touch on bigger problems than being annoyed by a dinner companion who picks his teeth and cleans his ears at the table, while talking absolute bollocks It s all about gender roles and sexism, and class system, and exploitation of children and sexual violence The stories start off light and satirical but get progressively darker Apparently they are obviously inspired by Chekhov and mock Virginia Woolf gently, which I wouldn t know because I haven t read either I know, how embarrassing What the hell Why would I even admit to that in public Anyway Mansfield was slightly embarrassed by those stories she wrote when she was 22 She called them immature and rolled her eyes at how obsessed she was with bodily functions there is a lot of detailed bodily functions here Quite honestly though, who isn t embarrassed by what they produced when they were 22 And if you aren t, then it s probably because you haven t developed any further and that s nothing to be proud of I checked my blog to see what I wrote when I was 22 and it s bloody cringe worthy I can t believe I was allowed to vote and drink alcohol I was a complete bimbo And I guess that s the difference there is no one in the world that could read my blog from those days and not cringe, while Mansfield s stories, even if occasionally immature, smart ass and swaggering, are still very much readable, a hundred years later.I changed my Tinder profile to say that I like men who read Katherine Mansfield and Dorothy Parker I haven t been very lucky so far

  5. says:

    As everybody knows 24 is the highest number, and in the same spirit there are only two women writers, Jane Austen is one, and then there is the other one.That other one though is multifaceted.Mansfield herself apparently regarded this collection as immature, which I suppose we can understand in many different ways Everything from Mansfield saying pooh don t be impressed by these, kiddo because you ain t since anything yet, I ve once started to write before she cartwheeled down the street and As everybody knows 24 is the highest number, and in the same spirit there are only two women writers, Jane Austen is one, and then there is the other one.That other one though is multifaceted.Mansfield herself apparently regarded this collection as immature, which I suppose we can understand in many different ways Everything from Mansfield saying pooh don t be impressed by these, kiddo because you ain t since anything yet, I ve once started to write before she cartwheeled down the street and black flipped into her publisher s office, down to feeling, as I did at first, that the stories were immature in the simpler sense of ew, other people talking about their bodies and bodily functions, totally gross and disgusting, I m going to be alone in my room with my genius as though she was some kind of turn of the century Adrian Mole.I read furtherDo you know that poem of Sappho about her hand in the starsI am curiously sapphic And this is so remarkable not only am I sapphic, I find in all the works of all the greatest writers, especially in their unedited letters, some touch, some sign of myself some resemblance, some part of myself, like a thousand reflections of my own hands in a dark mirror But what a bother, said Ip.41 and furtherIs it a novel asked Elsa shyly Of course it is a novel, said I How can you be so positive said Frau Kellermann, eyeing me severely Because nothing but a novel could produce an effect like that Ach, don t quarrel, said the Advanced lady sweetly Yes it is a novel upon the Modern Womanp.82 I felt both those passages were about Mansfield and her ambition at that stage in her brief life From the first quotation I felt that this collection was not so much about sensitive English woman meets boorish Germans before the first world war so much as Mansfield confronts herself, I recalled Virgina Woolf writing in her diary that Mansfield stank like a civet cat from the perfume she wore , the women in these stories I feltandwere facets of Mansfield herself, as she was, also as she might become, or have been From the second it seemed to me that this is Mansfield s anti manifesto You can t, she says, come to a conclusion about the Modern Woman and it is impossible to present contemporary woman in a novel because the form of the novel tends to a message and a single viewpoint No, instead you have to smash it to understand it Once you ve smashed the mirror into enough pieces then perhaps can you begin to get a sense of the many facets of the modern woman, says the young woman from New Zealand, pregnant and hiding from English social disapproval in deepest, darkest Bavaria.And what does she show us Artistic pretension, rivalries with the difficult Mother, illegitimacy, sexual violence, snobbery and social exclusion, abuse, marriage as a battleground of dominance and inherent abuse, marriage as a chain of childbirths none of which could never be personal concerns or worries for Mansfield herself, oh, no never For Mansfield the experience of being a modern woman can not be expressed in a novel with a beginning, a middle and an end, but only in fragments, disconnected fragments offering foreboding, promise view spoiler and not necessarily the promise of anything good hide spoiler or both.Some of these themes continue into her later fiction though with an over laying preoccupation with death, and I think, returning to the question of immaturity, with asophisticated use of setting, imagery and incident But there is an intensity and sharpness here Her child was stillborn, the stories live

  6. says:

    I read this sometime in the last few years It s an interesting collection Hoo wih shouted the wind, shaking the window sashes very creative

  7. says:

    I realize I m about to piss off some lovely people around here, but it can t be helped I dislike Virginia Woolf A lot The other day at the gym I was watching Family Guy on mute yes, this is relevant and the closed captions described a character s unintelligible yammering as pretentious babble Exactly Pretentious babble is what I hear in my head when I read Woolf I know what you re thinking But, but the beauty, the lyricism, the subtle nuances, the, the Yeah, fine, whatever Pretentio I realize I m about to piss off some lovely people around here, but it can t be helped I dislike Virginia Woolf A lot The other day at the gym I was watching Family Guy on mute yes, this is relevant and the closed captions described a character s unintelligible yammering as pretentious babble Exactly Pretentious babble is what I hear in my head when I read Woolf I know what you re thinking But, but the beauty, the lyricism, the subtle nuances, the, the Yeah, fine, whatever Pretentious babble It s just me, alright I readily admit my mind is neither subtle nor nuanced enough to appreciate the delicate English rose that is Virginia Woolf Okay, if you want the truth, I had mildly positive feelings about Woolf until a girlfriend dragged me to see The Hours and I spent the whole time swallowing my own sick.Why this apparently random and senseless attack on the grande dame of the English novel Because I always had a preconception that Katherine Mansfield was in the same tradition of gauzy, water coloured impressionism But she s not like that at all She doesn t do lyrical Her prose is so astringent and vinegary you could pickle a fetus in it or, you know, something inoffensive And her irony just withering the kind of irony that shrivels everything it touches men, women, children, and Germans Especially Germans According to impeccable scholarly sources Wikipedia , In a German Pension is largely autobiographical As a very young woman, Mansfield found herself scandalously pregnant and was packed off to a Bavarian spa by her mother for a rest cure i.e childbirth on the hush hush In that light, the book reads like a clever girl s literary revenge on her circumstances I ll show these stupid Germans And fuck you, mom. Most of the pieces here are not really stories they relike tart little sketches that capture a moment or a character while avoiding easy drama and cheap epiphanies Some readers will be frustrated by the studied uneventfulness, but I m okay with it In my experience, a good 90% of life is just a bunch of nondescript stuff that won t fit into a slick narrative, that isn t even worthy of an anecdote But clearly I need to get outIf the book lacks finish Mansfield later dismissed it as immature you have to remember this is the work of a twenty two year old woman writing in 1910 The date is startling because there s hardly a line here that couldn t have been written yesterday Somehow this rebellious, messed up Kiwi chick turned herself into a modernist before there was any modernism to write home about Just goes to show you how far a little talent and a shitload of anger can carry a person

  8. says:

    Katherine Mansfield died of tuberculosis at the age of 34 34 I m 34 That just puts a whole lot of shit in a whole lot of perspective.I was going through one of those phases where I m reading a really big book at home but currently don t have anything tiny enough to carry with me on the bus to and from work, so I m in a major funk, so I spent a good part of last night opening books from my shelves, reading a page or two, and then putting it back Nothing was speaking to me.This slight little c Katherine Mansfield died of tuberculosis at the age of 34 34 I m 34 That just puts a whole lot of shit in a whole lot of perspective.I was going through one of those phases where I m reading a really big book at home but currently don t have anything tiny enough to carry with me on the bus to and from work, so I m in a major funk, so I spent a good part of last night opening books from my shelves, reading a page or two, and then putting it back Nothing was speaking to me.This slight little collection of Mansfield s writing spoke to me from the beginning The stories in this collection were inspired by her time spend in Bavaria where she was sent to recuperate after a miscarriage Mansfield was an observer of the best quality she took what she saw and heard and applied it to her writing And here are those stories.I fell in love with Mansfield when I read her Journals Even in some of her random thoughts, I could tell she had a strength in her writing that made me want to knowabout her She was known as one of the modernists and was friendly with other modernist types like D.H Lawrence and Virginia Woolf, and like so many other writers who died too fucking young, I wonder what she could have accomplished had she not contracted tuberculosis She wrote about women in a way that most writers were, butimportantly she wrote about people in a way that not many people of her time were These stories are satirical, cutting, and often leaves the reader feeling unsettled To think that Mansfield was so young when this collection was published leaves me feeling pretty lazy.And unfortunately I couldn t stop reading this, so now it s back to the drawing board in regards to finding something else to read this week during my commute It s no tuberculosis, but that s what I ve got going on reading funk At least this little collection helped me remember there s good literature out there, sometimes even in small packages

  9. says:

    An excellent set of short stories brief with abrupt and unsettling endings and sharp, dry humour These are early stories by Katherine Mansfield, written when she was barely over 20 She was recuperating from a miscarraige in Germany and from a short unpleasant marraige The stories analyse the German middle class and their habits, prejudices and loves They also look at thedifficult lives of the servants Mansfield was in the vanguard of the modernist movement acquainted with Virginia Wo An excellent set of short stories brief with abrupt and unsettling endings and sharp, dry humour These are early stories by Katherine Mansfield, written when she was barely over 20 She was recuperating from a miscarraige in Germany and from a short unpleasant marraige The stories analyse the German middle class and their habits, prejudices and loves They also look at thedifficult lives of the servants Mansfield was in the vanguard of the modernist movement acquainted with Virginia Woolf and D H Lawrence and the like.There is a focus on the role of women as wives, mothers, lovers, put upon servants the wives as well as the servants and there is a sense of injustice and even rage underneath Some are very funny, some tragic One in particular has a jaw dropping ending The Child who was tired that stays with you , the horror of it gradually seeping in.Mansfield was influenced by Chekov and became an increasingly good short story writer brfore her early death Mansfield referred to these stories as immature as she developed her craft but they are fresh, sharply humourous and do feel very modern

  10. says:

    What a wonderful little book A selection of short stories set in a German B B just prior to WW1 It is full of life and finely observed foibles, jealousies, love, even murder all are there It has a contemporary feel to it, for all that it was written a century ago There is impish humour aplenty and enough stings in the tale to please a scorpion.I am delighted that I chanced upon this book, and I will look out forby the same author What a wonderful little book A selection of short stories set in a German BB just prior to WW1 It is full of life and finely observed foibles, jealousies, love, even murder all are there It has a contemporary feel to it, for all that it was written a century ago There is impish humour aplenty and enough stings in the tale to please a scorpion.I am delighted that I chanced upon this book, and I will look out forby the same author

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