Sussex Tales



❰EPUB❯ ✰ Sussex Tales Author Jan Edwards – E17streets4all.co.uk Jan Edwards s prize winning Sussex Tales runs a witty and thought provoking gamut of village events and its curious characters From fanged ferret to bulls in lead masks ancient hand grenades to explod Jan Edwards s prize winning Sussex Tales runs a witty and thought provoking gamut of village events and its curious characters From fanged ferret to bulls in lead masks ancient hand grenades to exploding ginger beer cricketing dogs to wassailing orchards Sussex Tales weaves traditional country wines, recipes, folklore and Sussex dialect into these natural tales of living a farming childhood in the vanished world of s and s rural lifeWinner of the Winchester Conference Short Volume prize.Sussex Tales

Jan Edwards winner of the Arnold Bennett Book Prize with Winter Downs Bunch Courtney Investigation She also has the Winchester Slim Volume prize and British Fantasy KEW award Plus a joint British Fantasy Award for best Small Press Alchemy PressHer latest book In Her Defence Bunch Courtney Investigation is available now in paper and kindle formats Her short fiction can be found in crime, horror and fantasy anthologies in UK, US and EuropeJan edits anthologies for The Alchemy Press and Fox Spirit Press, and has written for Dr Who spinoffs with Reel Time Pictures as well as a short story in the accompanying book More details available at signup.

Paperback  · Sussex Tales PDF/EPUB ò
  • Paperback
  • 200 pages
  • Sussex Tales
  • Jan Edwards
  • English
  • 24 May 2019
  • 0993000819

10 thoughts on “Sussex Tales

  1. says:

    I ve had the pleasure of being edited by Jan when she s wearing her other hat so I was really looking forward to reading her work, red pen at the ready But to sum up my thoughts in one sentence This book of short stories is just lovely Although set primarily in the 1960s, Edwards paints a delightful picture of rural life as seen through the eyes of a child that had probably existed in one form or other for centuries The village countryside and the lives of those who live there there are I ve had the pleasure of being edited by Jan when she s wearing her other hat so I was really looking forward to reading her work, red pen at the ready But to sum up my thoughts in one sentence This book of short stories is just lovely Although set primarily in the 1960s, Edwards paints a delightful picture of rural life as seen through the eyes of a child that had probably existed in one form or other for centuries The village countryside and the lives of those who live there there are as entwined as ivy and ash two things that feature in some of the tales The stories themselves have the quality of fireside or saloon bar anecdotes told using lyrical prose, liberally sprinkled with Sussex dialect with a good dollop of humour thrown in I may never attempt to make ginger beer, seems far too dangerous After every story there is a recipe quite often for alcoholic beverages of which I heartily approve Following the recipes, is a description of the applicable folk remedy for which the brew was often used This addition adds another, quite delicious, layer to the tales of a country life that I imagine still exists in some form but is, like morning mist, fading If you want to read something warm and bright and gently humorous about traditional life and people, Sussex Tales is well worth a read

  2. says:

    A wonderful jaunt through Sussex following the life of Susie Birch I didn t know what to expect when picking up Sussex Tales, sometimes these kinds of compilations can be bitty and trite But what I got was a handful of heart warming anecdotes from young Susie Birch who lives on a farm with her mum, dad and big brother Len Starting in the spring and finishing with a snap shot of Christmas Jan Edwards creates a believable and lovable village life Included at the end of every chapter is a recip A wonderful jaunt through Sussex following the life of Susie Birch I didn t know what to expect when picking up Sussex Tales, sometimes these kinds of compilations can be bitty and trite But what I got was a handful of heart warming anecdotes from young Susie Birch who lives on a farm with her mum, dad and big brother Len Starting in the spring and finishing with a snap shot of Christmas Jan Edwards creates a believable and lovable village life Included at the end of every chapter is a recipe or further detail about the food and drink consumed by the characters, I ve already decided to have a go at some of the wines and a cake recipe too I moved to Sussex in 2013 and this is probably the last book I ll finish in my home here before I move next week, what a perfect way to round off my time on the south coast Thank you Goodreads First Reads and Jan Edwards

  3. says:

    I absolutely love this book, having grown up in the Cheshire countryside 30 years after this story or rather collection of stories was set I was amazed at just how similar country living around the UK and over three decades was The book provides a wonderful sense of nostalgia, and personally for me it brought back my own memories of country fairs at schools, Sunday school and the angry bull in the field This book isn t just for people who grew up in Sussex, or for people who grew up next doo I absolutely love this book, having grown up in the Cheshire countryside 30 years after this story or rather collection of stories was set I was amazed at just how similar country living around the UK and over three decades was The book provides a wonderful sense of nostalgia, and personally for me it brought back my own memories of country fairs at schools, Sunday school and the angry bull in the field This book isn t just for people who grew up in Sussex, or for people who grew up next door to a farm, or grew up in the 1950s 1960s but for everyone

  4. says:

    Sussex Tales is a collection of stories set in Sussex, with the addition of some interesting recipes and folklore to boot The narrator is the young Susan, who at times demonstrates that she s a little bit wiser than her years.This collection that easily could be a twee and saccharine toe dip into a time gone by has a darker edge to it Instead of, oh wasn t it jolly when people still spent ha pennies and made their own country wines, we have stories with truth at the heart.The first chapter ope Sussex Tales is a collection of stories set in Sussex, with the addition of some interesting recipes and folklore to boot The narrator is the young Susan, who at times demonstrates that she s a little bit wiser than her years.This collection that easily could be a twee and saccharine toe dip into a time gone by has a darker edge to it Instead of, oh wasn t it jolly when people still spent ha pennies and made their own country wines, we have stories with truth at the heart.The first chapter opens with a new born lamb being kept warm in the family kitchen and the story relishes the youthful exuberance that children have when in the company of young animals, however Susan makes no bones about being aware where animals bred for food end up The honesty of life and death at lambing season is written well without any hint of mawkish window dressing.The chapters not only give an insight into the area where the stories take place but they clearly investigate the human condition, in Cowslips and the Gorgon, we get to see extended family interaction and the influence of the matriarch In Oak Leaves and Hand Grenades it s the politics of being siblings that is handled with ease as an amusing story of discovery unravels.My favourite chapter, Scallops and Raspberry Pie is a cleverly executed story An innocent Sunday school trip to the seaside is laced with enough potential danger to tempt the reader into creating sub plots as it unfolds Do the young girls understand how their actions could be interpreted by the intriguing man in the shell shop Superbly crafted, the author introduces an undercurrent of malevolence that the reader readily interprets into alleged domestic violence, however, at no point does Edwards confirm our suspicions Mixed with the comedy that is woven into this tale of fish paste sandwiches, beach cricket and tucking of knickers into skirts is that post 1965 paranoia of children going missing at fairgrounds that many of us grew with.Ms Edwards has the ability to write a simple line that promotes involuntary facial tics, how can you not read, Linda slid on her most wheedling tone as easily as dragging on a well worn shoe, and not raise an eyebrow in remembrance of someone similar and lines like, He clutched an achingly new duffle bag to his chest with both arms and smile big enough to swallow melons, tease the corners of your mouth into a smileEach of the chapters run sequentially over the course of one year from spring lambing through to Christmas giving the narrative flow a sense of purpose and fluidity, something many collections of short stories fail to achieve.The stories are peppered with Sussex phrases and dialect, but not so liberally that you find yourself constantly flicking to the handy glossary at the back of the book, there s enough to give a sense of setting without alienating the reader.Whether you re from Sussex or not this is an appealing and often amusing collection of tales from a bygone age, and with sentences like, I scuttled after him, face stinging with the small, gritty snow that had begun to whistle on the tail of the bitter wind I defy you not to like them

  5. says:

    I m a Sussex gal, through and through maternal blood from the East paternal from the West From the moment I opened the pages of Jan Edwards Sussex Tales I was plunged into a state of nostalgia so strong I could taste the honey, smell Autumn s mulchy wet woods and not least, hear the familiar dialects of old that lazy Sussex burr of my grandparents and beyond The author presents a palette of memories from her childhood, growing up in the farming countryside of the 50s and 60s Her tales I m a Sussex gal, through and through maternal blood from the East paternal from the West From the moment I opened the pages of Jan Edwards Sussex Tales I was plunged into a state of nostalgia so strong I could taste the honey, smell Autumn s mulchy wet woods and not least, hear the familiar dialects of old that lazy Sussex burr of my grandparents and beyond The author presents a palette of memories from her childhood, growing up in the farming countryside of the 50s and 60s Her tales are those of the not so fictional Sue an amalgam of Jan Edwards and others , her gabardine mac always clammy and damp in the darker months of the year She speaks of the joys and sadness of the lambing season of feeding and warming the young while her father attends to the ewes There are references to old crafts such as using curved needles to stitch halters and important events are included too the Sussex bonfire tradition, those rebellious parades which continue to this day, the ire in many people s souls still stoked Wassail, singing the apples from the trees, giving thanks and pouring libations of juice and of cider Maypole dancing twisted ribbons.We read of characters whose appearance and personalities are so perfectly rendered that we can almost see them approach Gorgon the furious bull with his blinding lead mask, the wise Shell Man with his scallops and conch shells in which you really can hear the sea Goody Hurst is a name any respectable 15th century witch might have carried but here she is in 20th century Sussex, wily still Sue, her friends and family members seem always on the go, tramping across fields, down lanes, through woods They gather conkers, play skipping games with old rhymes such as the Knuckers and Farisees , avoid the Knocking of the harvest when the last triangle of corn wheat is ploughed and guns fire indiscriminately at the poor creatures that had taken refuse there.This book is not only a wonderful reminder of the county s past and rich heritage, which sets the traditions and language in stone but important too in recording recipes, wines and medicinal uses of plants, leaves, barks andThese tasty and sometimes strange blends could so easily have become lost in time, forgotten It s heartening to see them written down to be kept forever.Anyone with Sussex connections, an interest in post war Britain, a love of English mysteries and or a fascination with flora will surely relish Sussex Tales I do, and I highly recommend it

  6. says:

    now in new edition

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