King of the Dead



❰EPUB❯ ✼ King of the Dead Author R.A. MacAvoy – E17streets4all.co.uk Popular ePub King of the Dead author RA MacAvoy The way the author shows is genius and it really helps me connect with the story Popular ePub, King of the Dead author RA MacAvoy The way the author shows is genius and it really helps me connect with King of Kindle - the story.King of the Dead

Roberta Ann R A MacAvoy is a fantasy and science fiction author in the United States Several of her books draw on Celtic King of Kindle - or Taoist themes She won the John W Campbell Award for Best New Writer in R A MacAvoy was born in Cleveland Ohio to Francis and Helen MacAvoy She attended Case Western Reserve University and received a BA in She worked from to as an assistant t.

King of the Dead Epub Õ King of  Kindle -
  • Kindle Edition
  • 288 pages
  • King of the Dead
  • R.A. MacAvoy
  • English
  • 18 July 2014

10 thoughts on “King of the Dead

  1. says:

    I wish I knew why I liked this book and the series as much as I do It's not for the plot; while there was nothing wrong with the plot it wasn't the main attractionPerhaps it is the writing The prose is perfection simple elegant clean minimalistic and not flashy or distracting The descriptions are understated and somehow it sets a tone and an atmosphere RA MacAvoy is a writer's writer and has a great command of the languageOr perhaps it is the characters There are only a few characters and they are sketched in just a few strokes but they are different and interesting in their own wayIn any case the book is not like most other fantasies In some sense not a lot happens But in an another sense a lot of little things happen each of them a mini story in their own right and just like a travelogue you have fun along the way

  2. says:

    This second book in the Lens of the World fantasy series was at least as good as the first Again our female author writes from the point of view of a male character in a story that does not pass the Bechdel test for non male centered stories two female characters must have a conversation about something other than a man There are multiple characters who cross dress however The major character of Arlin a woman named Charlan at birth who poses as a man is called a gelding at one point by a male character who will later disguise himself as female Later in the story an actual eunuch is introduced A lot of this story set in an alternate late Medieval world revolves around discussions of and debunking of traditional ideas about gender and race It reminds me of the work of Ursula Leguin and of Ellen Kushner In the way that science fiction explores technology these fantasy novels by female writers are really social fiction exploring sociological concepts While character development was not very important in the kind of sci fi I grew up reading it is crucial to this kind of social fantasy It is the characters in King of the Dead rather than voice plot or even subversive gender play that I find most compelling In particular the main character and narrator Nazhuret is particularly sympathetic I found the character of the eunuch a little unresolved or unsatisfying Without too much of a spoiler I wanted to see of him and know about him than we didDon't start this book on a day when you have important things to do You may not want to put it down

  3. says:

    In this book set some years after the first in the series Nazhuret and his partner Arlin are being targeted by assassins and the attack which opens the story is the most serious so far Meanwhile war is brewing with the nearby country of Rhezmia where Nazuret discovered personal ties in the first volume He and Arlin are chosen as emissaries to try to talk peace with the Emperor but their personal assassins follow them and things become complex and difficult As with the first volume it becomes clear that there is a hidden agenda and possible traitorAs with the first volume the characters are multi faceted Nazhuret persists in trying to be a scientist in a mostly non scientific world yet the meaning of his name King of the Dead after an old god is constantly being imposed upon him by others and confusion of identity is a strong theme Firstly there are a lot of gender identity aspects Arlin as usual view spoilera woman who passes as a man hide spoiler

  4. says:

    This review will contain a few spoilers for RA MacAvoy’s previous book Lens of the World You’ll want to read that book before beginning King of the DeadKing of the Dead is the second story in RA MacAvoy’s LENS OF THE WORLD trilogy about Nazhuret a man who is writing his life story for his friend the king When we met Nazhuret at the beginning of Lens of the World he was an ugly orphan who had been raised in a government military academy Upon reaching his majority he left and became an apprentice to Powl a man who is much than the lens grinder he pretends to be Powl thoroughly educated Nazhuret in a multitude of subjects and disciplines Only toward the end of that first book do we realize why Powl took an interest in an ugly orphan — he recognized Nazhuret Read More

  5. says:

    This review will contain a few spoilers for RA MacAvoy’s previous book Lens of the World You’ll want to read that book before beginning King of the DeadKing of the Dead is the second story in RA MacAvoy’s LENS OF THE WORLD trilogy about Nazhuret a man who is writing his life story for his friend the king When we met Nazhuret at the beginning of Lens of the World he was an ugly orphan who had been raised in a government military academy Upon reaching his majority he left and became an apprentice to Powl a man who is much than the lens grinder he pretends to be Powl thoroughly educated Nazhuret in a multitude of subjects and disciplines Only toward the end of that first book do we realize why Powl took an interest in an ugly orphan — he recognized Nazh Read More

  6. says:

    Man I really really like these books These are mac and cheese for me just the right blend of prose and character and storyThis one continues the life of Nazhuret from book 1 and again it is pseudo epistolary This time Nazhuret is writing to his teacher Powl and he picks up the story at age 28 the previous story left off at 22 This time he and Arlin are off to prevent a warThe theme of perception vs reality vs possibly magic continues with the addition of Zhurrie living up to his name's meaning of King of the Dead and its implications It is not at all coincidental that the main character considers himself to be a scientist in a mostly pre scientific world and that he attempts to find rational explanations for unexplained phenomena; nor that both the first two books have added distance from the stories they're telling because they're epistolary The layers of distance between lived experience imagineddreamed experience remembered experience analyzed experience and retold experience are all evident if the reader is paying attention though as I mentioned in my review of book 1 this can also all be ignored if you just want a fun adventure story One telling uote from the book If I can I will call my magical experiences drug poisoning or deep philosophy but all these names do not change the fact that I do not understandI'm just so very pleased with these books Not too dark not too light not too angsty but angsty enough to hold attention Not pretentious but not mere fluff plenty of drama without being overblown Few wasted words plenty of subtlety graceful and thoughtful Great comfort reading I'm already about 23 of the way through book 3

  7. says:

    The second book in the Lens of the World trilogy follows Zhurries and Arlin on a dangerous uest to Rhezmia partly to discover who has been attempting to assassinate them and then who has been instigating war between their native Velonya and the empire to the south Where the first book Lens of the World gave us fantasy as seen—and challenged—by a scientific viewpoint this story immerses the characters in a world of visions and prophecies This isn’t the magic of Tolkien’s Middle Earth and it may not even be magic at all As Zhurrie himself says “If I can I will call my magical experiences drug poisoning or deep philosophy but all these names do not change the fact that I do not understand” So we’re left with haziness ambiguityI have plenty of appetite for ambiguity But what doesn’t work so well here is MacAvoy’s use of visions and hallucinations to invoke the grayness of this world’s magic Zhurrie’s narration is already at an arm’s length from the action that’s MacAvoy’s style and there are times when the retrospective storytelling oddly doesn’t allow us the benefit of hindsight Yes Zhurrie might have been confused in the moment but why are so many confusions left unresolved when he’s had time to reflect afterward? Wouldn’t he be able to piece together the action afterward with greater detail? The result to me was that the book got mushy in the middle Too many dreamlike seuences too many confused action scenes The story does redeem itself at the end with some very concrete action and the characters continue to live and breathe convincingly throughout so I will stick with this trilogy But the second book did not live up to the strong first entry

  8. says:

    If this book were food it would have about 10 courses involving salads and sorbets and roast lamb This stuff is so damned addictiveI would like to ask this idiot publisher why hesheit chose to praise the first two books in the trilogy all over the cover and title page but not list the third book ANYWHERE? Jeez

  9. says:

    Even when writing a fairly standard fantasy MacAvoy's lovely prose and deft characterization stand out

  10. says:

    It was better than the first one in the series

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