Dark Emu



PDF Epub Dark Emu Bruce Pascoe Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Dark Emu Puts Forward An Argument For A Reconsideration Of The Hunter Gatherer Tag For Precolonial Aboriginal Australians The Evidence Insists That Aboriginal People Right Across The Continent Were Using Domesticated Plants, Sowing, Harvesting, Irrigating And Storing Behaviours Inconsistent With The Hunter Gatherer Tag Gerritsen And Gammage In Their Latest Books Support This Premise But Pascoe Takes This Further And Challenges The Hunter Gatherer Tag As A Convenient Lie Almost All The Evidence Comes From The Records And Diaries Of The Australian Explorers, Impeccable Sources.Dark Emu

Bruce Pascoe was born of Bunurong and Tasmanian Aboriginal heritage in the Melbourne suburb of Richmond and graduated from the University of Melbourne with a Bachelor of Education He is a member of the Wathaurong Aboriginal Co operative of southern Victoria and has been the director of the Australian Studies Project for the Commonwealth Schools Commission Bruce has had a varied career as a teach

➷ Dark Emu  Free ➭ Author Bruce Pascoe – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Kindle Edition
  • Dark Emu
  • Bruce Pascoe
  • English
  • 17 November 2017

10 thoughts on “Dark Emu

  1. says:

    5 Imagine you are riding beside the explorer and surveyor Major Thomas Mitchell 1792 1855 He s an educated and sensitive man and would have been great company, if a little eccentric I ll say Pascoe has written often about Aboriginal history, but this is the first book of his I ve read He has included extensive references to original diaries and papers as well as to research There are several photos, but the ones I ve included here are from other sources.I ve read some of this information in Bill Gammage s The Biggest Estate on Earth How Aborigines Made Australia, and I am still gob smacked that mainstream history hasn t yet seriously amended its description of the Aboriginal culture of colonial times as nomadic and stone age To compound the insult, colonists who ran across structures of some kind decided they were evidence of earlier European settlement, which meant they were just repossessing what was rightfully theirs But diaries and reports of the first explorers show clearly that the local indigenous people were well established across the continent Mitchell also records his astonishment at the size of the villages He noticed some hutsbeing circular and made of straight rods meeting at an upright pole in the centre the outside had first been covered with bark and grass, and the entirety coated over with clay The fires appeared to have been made nearly in th...

  2. says:

    This book ought to be made compulsory reading for every Australian There is a Ted talk by Bruce Pascoe that covers some of the ground covered here but this book goes into much detail.The standard understanding of Australia prior to white settlement, even in the kindest versions, is that the Australian Aboriginals were trapped in a land without domesticable plants or animals This meant they had to live the nomadic lives of hunter gatherers, and it also meant they were very unlikely to be able to develop any other forms of technology they were effectively trapped in the Stone Age Sure, they had clever sticks they could throw like the boomerang or to help them throw spears further, like a woomera, but really, all this was very prehistoric They had no agriculture and no permanent settlements, so, when they came into contact with our much advanced civilisation, really, the outcome was inevitable.Of course, this says something particularly disgusting about western civilisation that we can t come into contact with a civilisation less developed than our own without completely destroying it but then, if the last 1000 years or so have taught us anything about white people, surely it is tha...

  3. says:

    Check your conspiracy theories A free cut out and keep guideQuickly read the following stories For each one, decide whether you believe version A or version B._____________________The ShoahVersion A Between 1941 and 1945, the Nazi German government systematically arrested, interned and murdered about six million Jews.Version B Reports of the so called Holocaust were greatly exaggerated by the international Jewry in order to further their Zionist aims The so called death camps had no gas chambers, and less than 200,000 Jews were actually killed._____________________The moon landingsVersion A During the 1960s, the US inaugurated and pursued an ambitious program of manned space exploration, which at its height accounted for about 3% of the country s GDP and employed over 100,000 people It achieved its aim of allowing several people to travel to the Moon and back.Version B The so called Moon landings never happened, and the so called Apollo program was an elaborate fraud carried out for propaganda reasons Claimed documentary footag...

  4. says:

    When world famous Australian rapper Iggy Azalea was asked on a US radio show about Aboriginal people in her country, she replied The thing about Aboriginal people is they don t believe in living in enclosed structures, houses They all want to live under the stars because that s their culture, even now The government build houses and the Aboriginal people trash them and take the beds outside cos they don t believe in houses and they want to live under the stars Perhaps the rapper who later became the first artist since the Beatles 50 years ago to hold the top two spots on the American Billboard Hot 100 chart with their first hits should read this book Prolific Aboriginal author Bruce Pascoe s Dark Emu extensively documents not only pre colonial Aboriginal housing, but also engineering, fishing and farming methods Here are some quotes that jumped out at me Many northern Australian museums display long, knife like implements, which usually bear legends such as of unknown use when in fact they are juan knives long sharp blades of stone with fur covered handles, which the explorer Gregory described the Aboriginal people using to cut down the grain.As one of Australia s most senior archaeologists confided to me after struggling to gain official interest in her excavation of a so...

  5. says:

    4.5 sDark Emu aboriginal Australia and the birth of agriculture is a non fiction book by lecturer, researcher and award winning author, Bruce Pascoe Pascoe is of Bunurong and Tasmanian Aboriginal heritage In this book, he tries to convey a wealth of information about Australia s indigenous population before white settlement with which many readers will be unfamiliar Contrary to previously accepted belief that the Australian aboriginals were hunter gatherers, Pascoe details evidence of agriculture, of engineering and of game management Much of the evidence comes from the journals and diaries of early explorers and settlers They were often amazed at the sophistication, extent and beauty of aboriginal architecture and constructions, including stone houses, dams, weirs, sluices and fish traps That all this was known but never officially acknowledged, nor taught in schools, is a sad indictment on the greed of early settlers and government seeking to rationalise their theft.The aboriginals maintained permanent fisheries and were experienced in aquaculture the Brewarrina fish traps are possibly the oldest known human construction It s perhaps the ultimate irony that at the time of first settlement, abalone were referred to as mutton fish and deemed only suitable for the blacks, but now that Asian markets increase demand, they ar...

  6. says:

    I debated for a long time on whether or not I should properly review this I didn t really feel like I could adequately review a book of non fiction without sounding like a total noob But at the end of the day, I may be a noob, but this work explores a lot of really important issues about aboriginal culture and land pre colonisation and I think it s really important that people are at least aware that this knowledge exists and is publicly available.In saying that however, 1 I haven t rated it and, 2 it s going to be fairly short Both because of aforementioned noob status, but also because I don t think it s particularly fair to rate a non fiction work Me rating it isn t exactly going to change the fact that it s all true.Anyway, I found this book to be a very, very interesting read It s amazing how humans can fool themselves into believing their own preconceived notions Reading this simultaneously amazed and disgusted me just for the fact that people were so arrogant back then I mean, we still are Bloody white people think the world was served on a silver platter for them.Ahem I think that at the end of the day, t...

  7. says:

    This should be required reading And all the money needed to do the further research suggested in this book should be given over now Read it.

  8. says:

    This book proves that there is a need for a comprehensive coverage of this subject of Aboriginal Australians and their pre colonial agriculture At 156 pages of text far too short so therefore not as in depth as I would have thought possible.None the less fascinating Recommended.

  9. says:

    In Dark Emu the author, Bruce Pascoe, refers to some other books discussing land use in Australia pre European intrusion I ve read Bill Gammage s The Biggest Estate on Earth and thoroughly enjoyed its challenge to read our landscape differently.Bruce Pascoe has Bunurong Tasmanian Heritage and brings a overtly political and personal approach to the question of how humans have managed and lived in the Australian country through the millennia The book isn t long, and I m not going to try to summarise it It s a challenge to look at the past with new eyes, and so, to see possibilities in the future Possibilities of native food farming, ecological management, conservation of sacred and archaeological sites, and pride in a sustainable lifestyle heritage.The use of European records to show how they saw the country and the people living in it at first contact is fascinating There were villages, yam growing side note the yam daisy tubers sound delicious , fish processing, s...

  10. says:

    This Christmas I visited a friend who gave me two precious things a copy of Bruce Pascoe s book Dark Emu and an envelope of seeds from the daisy yam, Microsceris lanceolata, known as murnong in the Boonwurrung language.Dark Emu begins by challenging the received historical wisdom about Australian Aboriginal peoples which says that they were hunter gatherers who lived opportunistically in a kind of harsh subsistence at the hands of nature Pascoe argues that this description suited early settlers who wanted to see indigenous people as passive and childlike unable to take responsibility for the land on which they wandered and undeserving of its possession By contrast, Pascoe shows a very different indigenous relationship to land and nature Working systematically through early white accounts of contact with Aboriginal people and their land, Pascoe shows how accomplished Aboriginals were as farmers The daisy yam is a case in point This highly nutritious tuber grew prolifically across much of southern Australia and was c...

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