Europe: Hierarchy and Revolt 1320-1450



This Book Provides A Classic Introduction To A Key Period In The History Of Europe The Transition From Medieval To Renaissance Europe In This Updated Edition, Professor Holmes Traces The Main Political Events As Well As Describing Broader Changes In Social Structure And Culture He Reveals The Interactions Between Politics, Society And Ideas That Contributed To The Problems And Changes Of This PeriodEurope: Hierarchy and Revolt 1320-1450

George Arthur Holmes FBA born 22 April 1927 in Aberystwth died 29 January 2009 was Chichele Professor of Medieval History at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, 1989 94.

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  • Hardcover
  • 296 pages
  • Europe: Hierarchy and Revolt 1320-1450
  • George Arthur Holmes
  • English
  • 12 March 2019
  • 063121500X

10 thoughts on “Europe: Hierarchy and Revolt 1320-1450

  1. says:

    A overview of the latter middle ages17 June 2012 This book pretty much read like my Medieval and Renaissance History subject at university, though it was set over a much tighter period The period explored is between 1300 to 1450, which is the later medieval period, at a time when the Renaissance was just beginning in Italy and the Byzantine empire was in decline It was during this time that Constantinople fell to the invading Turks who had laid seige the city The Iberian Peninsula had been A overview of the latter middle ages17 June 2012 This book pretty much read like my Medieval and Renaissance History subject at university, though it was set over a much tighter period The period explored is between 1300 to 1450, which is the later medieval period, at a time when the Renaissance was just beginning in Italy and the Byzantine empire was in decline It was during this time that Constantinople fell to the invading Turks who had laid seige the city The Iberian Peninsula had been liberated from the Moor occupiers, but was not yet modern Spain rather it was the two kingdoms of Aragon and Castille , though they had merged by 1450 This was also the period of the Spanish Inquisition which is not surprising since the idea was to remove the remaining non Christians on the peninsula Meanwhile, England and France were at war, and would remain so the entire time, and at the conclusion of the war which was the Hundred Years War England had been expelled from the continent So, that was the run down of the period and I guess we should consider what important events occurred during this time and how it changed history as we know it Well, the most important invent was the fall of Constantinople Well, actually, the book ends three years before the actual fall, but it was during this period that we begin to see the migration of the orthodox church from Greece and Anatolia over to Italy, which in turn began to usher in the Renaissance However, the Turks had already had the city surrounded, and were beginning to push into Greece and the Balkan Peninsula which they would continue to invade over the next 200 years Constantinople was already in its death throes, which it had been since the Venetians sacked the city in 1204 It is also during this period that we begin to see the decline of the Catholic Church which over the next hundred years would usher in the Reformation While there were a number of mini reformations before Luther, many of these such as the Hussites occurred after this time period The important event was what was known as the Babylonian Captivity I cannot say too much about this particular event, except that at this time there were numerous disputes as to who was Pope, and the struggle between the church and state was coming to a head The Babylonian Captivity, called after the period of 70 years that the Israelites were exiled to Babylon, involved the papal seat being moved to the French city of Avignon During this time Rome had become littlethan a ghost town Germany didn t exist per se, but was rather a large collection of principalities and city states headed up by the Holy Roman Emperor This position wasn t like your typical king, in that you would inherit the position from your father, but rather you would be elected for life This was not democratic at all namely because the only candidates were nobility and only the nobility could vote in fact only the heads of the German states could vote However this was before the Hapsburgs came onto the scene The Hierarchy in the title referred to the semi fuedal system that was evident at this time, though we do see the decline of the fuedal system during this period as the populace becamemobile Politically there was still a strict hierarchical structure that was dominated by social positions and family ties People still worked the land and still did not travel much beyond their villages, however mercantile trade was beginning to develop and we begin to see the foundations of the modern banking system appearing in Northern Italy as well as the development of Mercantile Republics such as Florence and Venice The revolt in the title has nothing to do with revolt against governments, that wasn t to happen for another two hundred years, but rather it was the revolt against the church The period of the twin pillars of Christendom was coming to an end, particularly since many of the kings were becoming quite annoyed at the Pope s constant interference in their affairs This event, as mentioned, opens the door for the Reformation, particularly where a number of princes rallied behind Luther and protected him from the agents of the Pope This could never have happened if the Pope still held ultimate authority over Western Europe

  2. says:

    Wandering through the corridors of time can be an utterly strange and compelling experience, particularly when your guide is as lucid and informative as George Holmes is in this account of the History of Europe from 1320 1450 This Late Medieval period saw the birth of Printing, the Church in Schism, the fall of Constantinople and the fall of the Ard knight This book is relatively short at about 350 pages and substitutes detail for narrative, which in my books makes it a great read.

  3. says:

    A great look at the fragmentation of the period without many of the nations that came later He covers the papal schism, the beginnings of reformation and renaissance.

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