Race Riots and Resistance: The Red Summer of 1919 (African American Literature and Culture: Expanding and Exploding the Boundaries)



Race Riots And Resistance Uncovers A Long Hidden, Tragic Chapter Of American History Focusing On The Red Summer Of 1919 In Which Black Communities Were Targeted By White Mobs, The Book Examines The Contexts Out Of Which White Racial Violence Arose It Shows How The Riots Transcended Any Particularity Of Cause, And In Doing So Calls Into Question Many Longstanding Beliefs About Racial Violence The Book Goes On To Portray The Riots As A Phenomenon, Documenting The Number Of Incidents, Describing The Events In Detail, And Analyzing The Patterns That Emerge From Looking At The Riots Collectively Finally And Significantly, Race Riots And Resistance Argues That The Response To The Riots Marked An Early Stage Of What Came To Be Known As The Civil Rights Movement.Race Riots and Resistance: The Red Summer of 1919 (African American Literature and Culture: Expanding and Exploding the Boundaries)

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  • Paperback
  • 234 pages
  • Race Riots and Resistance: The Red Summer of 1919 (African American Literature and Culture: Expanding and Exploding the Boundaries)
  • Jan Voogd
  • English
  • 14 January 2018
  • 9781433100673

15 thoughts on “Race Riots and Resistance: The Red Summer of 1919 (African American Literature and Culture: Expanding and Exploding the Boundaries)

  1. says:

    The events of the Red Summer of 1919 are riveting and it s hard not to find some parallel to today s xenophobic populism After WWI, black soldiers returned home, competing for jobs with white men, and expecting to be treated equally after fighting for their country White men saw them as competition not only for jobs but as threats to their pride as men Across the country tensions rose Riots broke out east and west, north and south As Voogd points out, there were myriad reasons for the explosions of violence, but they all came down to whites feeling threatened by blacks The media on both sides of the racial divide was often inflammatory, often wrongly casting blame, but one thing is apparent the riots were racially motivated attack by whites against black communities, often accompanied by a lynching The constitutio...

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