This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing



✈ [PDF / Epub] ✅ This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing By Jacqueline Winspear ✸ – E17streets4all.co.uk The New York Times bestselling author of the Maisie Dobbs series offers a deeply personal memoir of her family’s resilience in the face of war and privation

“Jacqueline Winspear has crea The Next Year We'll Be PDF/EPUB or New York Times bestselling author Next Year Kindle Ô of the Maisie Dobbs series offers a deeply personal memoir of her family’s resilience in the face of war and privation “Jacqueline Winspear has created a memoir of her English childhood that is every bit as engaging as her Maisie Dobbs novels, just as rich in character and detail, history and humanity Her writing is lovely, elegant and welcoming” —Anne Lamott After sixteen novels, Jacqueline Winspear has taken the bold step of This Time PDF/EPUB ² turning to memoir, revealing the hardships and joys of her family history Both shockingly frank and deftly restrained, her memoir tackles such difficult, poignant, and fascinating family memories as her paternal grandfather's shellshock, her mother's evacuation from London during the Blitz; her softspoken animalloving father's torturous assignment to an explosives team during WWII; her parents’ years living with Romani Gypsies; and Jacqueline’s own childhood working on farms in rural Kent, capturing her ties to the land and her dream Time Next Year ePUB ↠ of being a writer at its very inception An eyeopening and heartfelt portrayal of a postWar England we rarely see, This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing is the story of a childhood in the English countryside, of working class indomitability and family secrets, of artistic inspiration and the price of memory.This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing

Next Next Year We'll Be PDF/EPUB or Year Epub Maisie Dobbs.

This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing PDF/EPUB ã This
    If you re looking for a CBR and CBZ reader memoir, revealing the hardships and joys of her family history Both shockingly frank and deftly restrained, her memoir tackles such difficult, poignant, and fascinating family memories as her paternal grandfather's shellshock, her mother's evacuation from London during the Blitz; her softspoken animalloving father's torturous assignment to an explosives team during WWII; her parents’ years living with Romani Gypsies; and Jacqueline’s own childhood working on farms in rural Kent, capturing her ties to the land and her dream Time Next Year ePUB ↠ of being a writer at its very inception An eyeopening and heartfelt portrayal of a postWar England we rarely see, This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing is the story of a childhood in the English countryside, of working class indomitability and family secrets, of artistic inspiration and the price of memory."/>
  • Hardcover
  • This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing
  • Jacqueline Winspear
  • English
  • 13 December 2018
  • 9781641292696

10 thoughts on “This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing

  1. says:

    Full disclosure: I know Jackie Winspear as she is a fellow crime writer with whom I've done panel presentations. Having said that, I loved her memoir, which will be available later in the summer. The memoir covers her childhood and adolescence in Kent, England, along with an exploration and description of the early years of her parents' marriage. It's a thoroughly enjoyable read. She brings to life not only the period of time during which she grew up but also the period of time that preceded her birth, when her mother's enormous, boisterous Irish family lived through the Blitz in London. She explores the childhood she experienced on the land in agrarian England where picking hops and strawberries and apples was just a way people like Jackie's parents earned enough to put food on the table and a roof over their heads. No indoor plumbing, no electricity, a bath taken in a tin tub in the kitchen, trenches dug when the outhouse needed to be moved. The joy of simple things like a Sunday visit from the clan and running around with a multitude of cousins, a barely functioning car, walks on the frosty ground with Dad. It's a delightful book all the way round.

  2. says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Although it was a memoir it also felt like a historical fiction novel. The writing style was perfect. Just enough detail to clearly paint a picture of the scene without extra words or fluff added.

    The themes of family and perseverance dominate this story. I found it both entertaining and educational. The stories of growing up in post-war England were fascinating. Her parents sounded like quite the characters and I felt like I really knew them through her story telling.

    Jacqueline Winspear is new to me and I am a fan after reading this book.

    Thank you to publisher, the author and NetGalley for the opportunity to read this book.

  3. says:

    An excellent memoir by the author of the Maisie Dobbs mystery series. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC.

  4. says:

    Jacqueline Winspear, the author of the popular Maisie Dobbs mystery series, takes a big departure, offering a warm and engaging memoir of her English childhood. This richly detailed and deeply personal account of her life and family offers a rare look at post-World War II England. Aptly titled This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing, the account recounts her family's travails, resilience and hope in the face of war, bombings, illness and PTSD. Despite everything, there's still hope, strength of spirit, the capacity for joy. As her father poignantly says to his gravely ill wife early in the book Haven't we had a great life?

    The author, now living in California, returned to her SoHo Press roots to publish her memoir that was clearly a labor of love, as well as a huge love letter to her large family and her working-class Kent childhoo that cycled through the seasons as everyone pitched in working on hops farms. We are taken into many private moments in the telling of family secrets, and throughout are touching accounts of her grandfather's shell shock stemming from his time in World War I, and her mother's painful stories of evacuation during the Blitz, plus her own accounts of pursuing her artistic life.

    The author discloses early in the book her prodigious ability to remember, an ability that apparently stems from a childhood accident that occurred around the time her mother started telling her stories way beyond her years and capacity. The memoir is clearly the richer for the author's ability to reach back through the years and recount in amazing, colorful and witty fashion a wealth of stories. At times I felt the author was talking directly to me over cups of tea in a dearly beloved home setting. I also enjoyed her ruminations on memory, its powers and costs.

    Maise Dobbs fans will gain greater insight into the mystery stories and the author behind them. I have never treated myself to a Maise Dobbs book but am looking forward to reading one. Full disclosure- I won this book through a Goodreads giveaway. This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing will be published in November, 2020.

  5. says:

    I have read and enjoyed all of the books in the Maisie Dobbs series. This new memoir by Winspear opens a window into her life growing up in the countryside of post WWII Britain. I understand more clearly the rich inspirations of her stories in her novels. Growing up and working on hop, fruit, and vegetable picking farms, living in a Romany community, and hearing about her interesting family background is a gift to the reader of a unique time and place. The idyllic English countryside is peppered with colorful characters and historic detail. I had to go online to see a video of the closed Hawkhurst train line mentioned in her memoir, which closed in 1961. I can almost see Jacqueline, her mother and brother traveling on these trains, the detail is so vivid. Living in this serene setting away from the noise of London is good for Winspear’s family but there is no lack of hardship or laborious hard work. Details of harsh effects on loved ones proves wars don’t end with armistices. Interspersed with poignant and eye opening stories is love of family and friends, especially among Jacqueline and her father as they go on walks in the country, learn about the value of work and saving, and resilience. This Time Next Year We’ll Be Laughing is a true gem of time and place gone by but teaches us to have faith in things that matter. Highly recommended. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an honest review of this book.

  6. says:

    To be upfront, I am not a fan of memoir or autobiographies. There has to be a really great reason for me to want to read this genre. I'm not saying they shouldn't be written or people shouldn't read them, but there can be bias to wanting to show yourself in a good light; which is totally understandable.

    So, why did I read this book? Especially considering I've never read any of Jacqueline Winspear's book. Well, above it states I received this through NetGalley and Library Journal's Day of Dialog. During this virtual conference, there were panels with the authors of upcoming books. I attended one, not really realizing it was centered around memoirs until I was in it. I decided to stick with it.

    I became fascinated with all three books by these women, including Jacqueline Winspear's This Time Next Year We'll be Laughing. She begins her story with her parents and continues on throughout her childhood Kent. Winspear reveals the joys and hardships of her family's history. She discusses the tough topics of her grandfather's shellshock, her mother's evacuation from London during the Blitz. Along with her soft-spoken, animal lover dad, who was assigned to an explosives team during WWII, and the years her parents spent living with Romani Gypsies.

    This was an eye-opening book not only to this woman's life but also to people's lives post-WWII. Winspear is shockingly frank and deftly restrained as she reveals the family history in such a way that I felt like I was reading fiction at times instead of a memoir.

    This actually made me want to read her Maisie Dobbs series, and I started listening to the first Maisie Dobbs on audiobook this past week.

    One big draw for me in deciding to read this book was her title. She explained during the panel that her dad had this saying, this time next year we'll be laughing. It was a mystical phrase said by Winspear's dad. Through all the bad times we're experiencing now, don't worry, this time next year we'll all still be here, clutching our sides, laughing.

  7. says:

    As a fan of the Maisie Dobbs books I was happy to see that Jacqueline Winspear was writing a memoir (read from an eARC from Netgalley) and I was not disappointed. Born to parents from South London and raised in the county of Kent, so much that appears in her books seems to flow from her life and those of her parents. Growing up, she had a life that mirrored the advancements Great Britain had after the war. She was a recipient of the National Health Service and other services that became available to ordinary people, including a college education (not to mention a grant that allowed her parents to put in an indoor bathroom!). As an American Baby Boomer, these services seem strange but I was a recipient of the same amenities, just provided in a different format.
    Great Britain might have provided more help to its less well off citizens after the war but that didn't mean that they didn't work and work hard for all of their gains. The stories of her parent's early married life and the lessons that have clung to Jacqueline Winspear make for fascinating reading. Tales of her extended family as well as her parents and her brother tell a story of love that the author feels to this day and is a part of her life. This was a wonderful memoir.

  8. says:

    Whether you are a fan of Winspear's novels or not, you will likely enjoy this entertaining and heartbreaking memoir filled with stories of her childhood and stories of the impact of WWI and WWII on her family members. Winspear herself was born in the late 1950s and led a life filled with moments of awe and joy, hard work and poverty, joy and sadness. She tells the stories in somewhat random order, but I was never confused about the timeline or topic. Her stories are engaging and full of emotion. At times I was laughing, at times in shock or tears. This just reinforced how good a writer Winspear is. Her memoir is chatty and engaging and filled with history, much like her novels. I can't wait to recommend it to my friends who are also fans.

    NOTE -- I mentioned fans a couple of times which would indicate that this book would only appeal to her readers. I don't think you would need to be familiar with her works to enjoy this memoir. It adds another dimension to know the stories that inspired her writing, but the memoir stands alone. Do you want to learn more about life in rural England in the 20th century? This is the book for you -- I learned a great deal and enjoyed every minute. It was just an added plus for me that I also enjoyed her novels.

  9. says:

    I got an ARC from NetGalley that I requested after watching Jacqueline Winspear on a panel (Unexpected Memoir) at Library Journal's Day of Dialog in May. I knew she was a popular author of fiction (based on all the books by her I had to reshelve) and she seemed interesting enough.

    Her descriptions were so vivid I felt like I was back in the English countryside with her. I would read chunks of it at a time, but I could easily not think about it when I wasn't reading it.

    This was definitely a leisurely-paced account of her childhood. It also covered family members' (especially her parents') origin stories and their war wounds. I wish it were a bit more chronological because I would read some part about her working as a teenager and the next chapter she would be a small child again. If you came to read about her being a writer, you'll be very disappointed. Winspear talks about it a little, but usually in the context with what her tale usually talks about: how poor she was and how hard everyone had to work. Indeed, the title is a quote from her father, which he said every time the state of affairs was miserable.

    I would say if you like Winspear's novels, you'll like this. And if you like memoirs and want to enjoy something engaging, you'll also like this.

  10. says:

    Jacqueline Winspear's memoir offers the stories of her grandparents, her parents, and her childhood in post World War 2 rural England. The privations suffered by England are hard to imagine for those of us who grew up in prosperous postwar America. Housing was in short supply and in the country, telephones, indoor plumbing, and even electricity were luxuries beyond the means of the working class. Everyone had to work as soon as they were able to contribute what they could to the survival of the family. Jacqueline learned to work hard without complaint always with her eyes on the end goal. Her hard work earned her a full scholarship to college, which in turn led to travel abroad, a career in journalism, and her first novel.

    Many of the experiences of her grandparents, her parents, and her relatives and neighbors found their way into the Maisie Dobbs novels and it was interesting to learn the history behind many of the characters and events in the novels. Winspear listened carefully to all the stories of the past and has incorporated them beautifully into her books.

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