Anatomy of a Typeface



An Analysis Of Letter Forms, From Garamond And Bembo To The Design And Manufacture Of Sans Serif And Newspaper Type.Anatomy of a Typeface

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Anatomy of a Typeface book, this is one of the most wanted Alexander S. Lawson author readers around the world.

[PDF] ↠ Anatomy of a Typeface Author Alexander S. Lawson – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 428 pages
  • Anatomy of a Typeface
  • Alexander S. Lawson
  • English
  • 10 November 2018
  • 0879233338

10 thoughts on “Anatomy of a Typeface

  1. says:

    I was hoping that this book would literally be an anatomy of a typeface a look at how the different parts of a typeface fit together to contribute to legibility, beauty, or some other desired characteristic This is actuallyof a roughly chronological history of typeface design It covers some of what I was looking for, but only in passing in discussing the merits or demerits of particular typefaces And it is unfortunately written for readers who already know quite a bit about printing a I was hoping that this book would literally be an anatomy of a typeface a look at how the different parts of a typeface fit together to contribute to legibility, beauty, or some other desired characteristic This is actuallyof a roughly chronological history of typeface design It covers some of what I was looking for, but only in passing in discussing the merits or demerits of particular typefaces And it is unfortunately written for readers who already know quite a bit about printing and typefounding Thanks to my school newspaper production days, I know what kerning and leading are, and I can tell a serif from a sans serif font But am I intimately familiar with the differences between a Monotype and a Linotype Dear reader, I am not I desperately wished for a glossary, at the very least The book was also published in 1990, so while it does discuss the early impact of computers on type design and typesetting, it misses out on recent developments This isn t a fatal flaw despite the fact that the author clearly expects the reader to know the difference between hand set type, Monotype, Linotype, and phototypeset material, this isn t primarily a book about typesetting technology But it does mean that there is no discussion of typefaces designed specifically for reading on a computer screen Which is a shame, because I would have liked to see Lawson s opinions of these faces Flaws aside, the book is full of interesting information about type and type design, and lots of gorgeous examples of various fonts Though I wish that the font examples were either specially indicated in the index, or cross referenced in the text it s not unusual for a reproduction of a font to appear some pages away from where it is discussed in the text, and I did a lot of flipping through the pages, trying to find that sample of Bodoni so I could see what was wrong with its serifs If you are interested in typefaces and printing, it deserves a look

  2. says:

    Rich and interesting tales for good exemplars across most of the type families as we know them The characters often come in an out, as Lawson sets this up as a sets of nearly individual lectures on a particular type and its related forms May be a tough read for someone who knows little about traditional printing and typefounding.

  3. says:

    There s a wealth of great information in here for anyone who s already interested in the topic, but the bulk of the writing is pretty dry it essentially reads like a textbook In fact, if you were to teach some kind of introductory History of Typefaces course and needed a textbook, this would be a fine choice Of course, it stops somewhere in the mid late 20th century It s so funny that this was published in my lifetime my copy says 1990 , yet feels like such a relic of a long gone era He There s a wealth of great information in here for anyone who s already interested in the topic, but the bulk of the writing is pretty dry it essentially reads like a textbook In fact, if you were to teach some kind of introductory History of Typefaces course and needed a textbook, this would be a fine choice Of course, it stops somewhere in the mid late 20th century It s so funny that this was published in my lifetime my copy says 1990 , yet feels like such a relic of a long gone era He talks about phototypesetting as if it s still a newfangled technology, and makes only a brief mention of digital type It s surreal to read an entire chapter about Times New Roman knowing that the author has no idea yet that it s become the default serif face for millions of people, or to see Helvetica confined to a paragraph at the end of the chapter on Gothics even the chapter about Bookman doesn t seem to be fully aware of how it would come to be practically synonymous with the 1970s It makes me feel like a time traveler like I want to reach through the pages and say, Mr Lawson, wait til you see what s coming

  4. says:

    I have been reading about fonts lately In part, I was inspired to do so after seeing an article about the Barack Obama campaign s use of the typeface GOTHAM for its publicity There is also a new documentary out on Helvetica see segment on Youtube.Anyway, Alexander Lawson s book is a compendium of famous fonts, their origins and distinctive features Want to know what a kiss impression refers to Read on My favorite font is one called GALLIARD I have been reading about fonts lately In part, I was inspired to do so after seeing an article about the Barack Obama campaign s use of the typeface GOTHAM for its publicity There is also a new documentary out on Helvetica see segment on Youtube.Anyway, Alexander Lawson s book is a compendium of famous fonts, their origins and distinctive features Want to know what a kiss impression refers to Read on My favorite font is one called GALLIARD chapter 11 , a Matthew Carter typeface based on a sixteenth century introduction by Robert Granjon It must also have been Lawson s favorite, for it was selected for setting his Anatomy of a Typeface

  5. says:

    Very useful as regards what is included.But Illustrations are often placed too far from the text that refer to them.Naturally Lawson could not go into detail as to modern digital types Nevertheless, it would have been nice if he had done what was in fact possible in the years before 1990 Hint Apple, Atari etc.

  6. says:

    A very interesting read but frustratingly arranged The typeface samples are almost randomly placed throughout the text, not usually anywhere near where they are covered in the text sometimes not even in the chapter focused on that typeface Ugh Not worth the work hunting down the typeface sample buried in the pages.

  7. says:

    What I love about this book He links typefaces to book designers and book printers, so if you have access to a rare books collection through a University or rare books library, you can find examples of the typefaces in their original forms in the original books you don t have to settle for studying the sometimes lackluster digital types.

  8. says:

    Just started this book It is fascinating to see what religious, aesthetic and economic factors were responsible for the evolution of the typefaces we are familiar with today From calligraphic illumination, to the first cut type used by Gutenberg, to electronic fonts.

  9. says:

    Alexander Lawson s Anatomy of a Typeface is an informative study of the history of the classic types ranging from Goudy Text to Newsletter Each typeface was designed to serve a particular purpose and Lawson explores the reasons behind it It s on my re read list.

  10. says:

    An excellent narrative on the development of several typefaces Covers everything from the blackface of Gutenberg to sans serif fonts Is great for explaining the peculiarities of why some things are the way they are in the world of typesetting and very readable.

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