La enfermedad



Ernesto Durn Knows Hes Ill His Obsession Goes Beyond Mere Hypochondria, And He Is Certain That There Is Only One Doctor That Can Save Him This Man, Doctor Andrs Miranda, Is Meanwhile Trying To Come To Terms With An Irrefutable Diagnosis That Shows His Father Has Cancer And Has Only Weeks Left Of His Life An Exceptional Book Written In An Unusual Tone That Combines Profound And Swift Storytelling, Appealing To Both A Readers Emotions And Intelligence Tyszka Offers Us A Version Of Existence That Addresses All Of Its Pleasures, But Also Its FragilityLa enfermedad

Alberto Jos Barrera Tyszka es un guionista, poeta y narrador venezolano.Se Licenci en Letras por la Universidad Central de Venezuela, de la que es profesor en la c tedra de Cr nicas En la d cada de los a os ochenta particip en los grupos de poes a Tr fico y Guaire Colaboraciones suyas han aparecido en diversas antolog as y publicaciones de Espa a, M xico, Argentina, Cuba y Venezuela Articulista habitual desde 1996 en el peri dico El Nacional, y colaborador regular en la revista Letras Libres Guionista de telenovelas en Argentina, Colombia, M xico y Venezuela Adem s, tiene publicadas varias novelas, libros de cuentos y de poes a junto con la periodista Cristina Marcano es coautor de una biograf a sobre Hugo Ch vez, que ha tenido gran impacto internacional.Ha sido traducido al mandar n, franc s, ingl s e italiano.

[PDF] ↠ La enfermedad Author Alberto Barrera Tyszka – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 168 pages
  • La enfermedad
  • Alberto Barrera Tyszka
  • Spanish
  • 01 March 2017
  • 8433971409

10 thoughts on “La enfermedad

  1. says:

    The Sickness is a novel about a doctor, his father, the doctor s secretary and one obsessed hypochondriac But mostly it is about sickness The novel concerns a perfectly healthy man convinced he is gravely ill and a very sick man who doesn t know he has terminal cancer because his own son and doctor cannot bring himself to break the news.Dr Miranda is a believer in telling the truth, whole truth and nothing but the truth He has always advocated a no nonsense approach towards the patients and h The Sickness is a novel about a doctor, his father, the doctor s secretary and one obsessed hypochondriac But mostly it is about sickness The novel concerns a perfectly healthy man convinced he is gravely ill and a very sick man who doesn t know he has terminal cancer because his own son and doctor cannot bring himself to break the news.Dr Miranda is a believer in telling the truth, whole truth and nothing but the truth He has always advocated a no nonsense approach towards the patients and has never had any difficulties until now, when the patient is his father and he has to tell him he only has a few weeks to live.Meanwhile in the background, another patient of his, Ernesto Dur n, is convinced he is dying and resorts to stalking his doctor who ignores him and his pleas Dr Miranda s secretary using her boss s absent mindedness passes herself off as her boss and engages in email correspondence with Dur n It soon metamorphoses itself from an innocent pastime into a dangerous sickness as well While Dr Miranda is trying to find the right words to say to his father, his patient and his secretary are slowly going mad.You might argue that 150 pages is not quite enough to tackle such a difficult subject as life, sickness and death And you might also argue that a couple of months isn t enough to come to terms with our own mortality Sadly, sometimes it s all we are going to be given Death won t wait until we are ready and the book s brevity could easily be interpreted as a symbol of our fleeting nature.Alberto Barrera Tyszka made the best of his 150 pages partly thanks to his knack for saying what s important in little quips like this one Blood is a terrible gossip, it tells everything It is also clear that he has done his homework and read everything that was produced on the subject of sickness in the history of the written word And he wants you to know it, so the book is peppered with clumsy interjections such as Perhaps he s remembering that novel by Louis Ferdinand C line, in which a doctor described illness as he would describe a face of an old acquaintance That is what weighs on Andr s now This is really the only fault of this otherwise good novel which meanders slowly around the events Suspense has been sacrificed to sadness and the melancholy of things calmly burning out.It should be a compulsory read on the subject which is becomingandintimidating and difficult to deal with within our society

  2. says:

    Talk to me,he says again.Don t let me die in silenceThis is a 2006 Venezuelan novel with two interwoven storylines one of a doctor who finds that his father has terminal illness, and doesn t know how to tell him the other of a hypochondriac patient who stalks that same doctor and wins the compassion of his secretary Through these characters, the novel explores people s different ways of dealing with sickness how sickness affects patients and those who surround them.The novelTalk to me,he says again.Don t let me die in silenceThis is a 2006 Venezuelan novel with two interwoven storylines one of a doctor who finds that his father has terminal illness, and doesn t know how to tell him the other of a hypochondriac patient who stalks that same doctor and wins the compassion of his secretary Through these characters, the novel explores people s different ways of dealing with sickness how sickness affects patients and those who surround them.The novel is really good in most parts, but some parts just felt awkward or unnecessary, like the literary references, and most of the doctors inner thoughts about medicine, I don t know, they just didn t feel right

  3. says:

    Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa Tears are very unliterary they have no form This is possibly the most dog eared book I ve ever had Folding down corners is my method for marking significant to me passages, but it clearly wasn t working with this fiction novel because I was marking every page I d never read this Venezuelan author before, but I hope to findof his work translated into English.Delicate prose, deep moral questions, and a stunning pace are what kept me ho Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa Tears are very unliterary they have no form This is possibly the most dog eared book I ve ever had Folding down corners is my method for marking significant to me passages, but it clearly wasn t working with this fiction novel because I was marking every page I d never read this Venezuelan author before, but I hope to findof his work translated into English.Delicate prose, deep moral questions, and a stunning pace are what kept me hooked into reading this in one sitting The story itself is rather simple a successful doctor discovers that his father is seriously ill Their close relationship is strained as the son weighs the consequences of telling his father the details of his illness In the meantime, another man, virtually unknown to the doctor, begins stalking him, imagining that he holds the cure for the the list of complaints he suffers from There s a push and pull to the narrative, as the poignant moments between father and son,nuanced with shared memories of grief, intertwine with the creepy certainty of the stalker Because of the health issues that permeate the novel, questions about the nature of health and wellness are explored, but in a brief, compelling way The author cites quotes of famous authors, ethicists and physicians, but he s not showing off, they are actually appropriate observations of how the human body deals with illness These asides never go too long or feel like a lecture, they fit the material in the most uncanny way.For example, Tyszka quotes Julio Ramon Ribeyro, who provides possibly the best explanation for the euphoria that exists after an episode of physical pain Physical pain is the great regulator of our passions and ambitions Its presence immediately neutralizes all other desires apart from the desire for the pain to go away This life that we reject because it seems to us boring, unfair, mediocre or absurd suddenly seems priceless we accept it as it is, with all its defects, as long as it doesn t present itself to us in its vilest form pain Tsyzka presents simple scenes with insightful observation On trying to read the face of a doctor while awaiting possibly bad news It s the illustration that accompanies a bad diagnosis, the first installment of an expression of condolence On imagining his father s worries Are the monsters of old age as terrible as those that assail us when we re children What do you dream about when you re sixty nine.Perhaps this is what his father dreams about he s in a laboratory, in the bowels of a hospital, surrounded by chemicals, sharp implements, gauze, and strangers all repellently dressed in white Events proceed in unexpected ways, and as a reader, you never quite know what direction you re being pulled in You feel empathy and disgust in altering passages, and the underlying fear is riveting I did find the ending a bit confusingI still am not sure I ve understood all the implications laid out.One scene confounds me It takes place on a ferry, where an obnoxious businessman makes a production of his importance and maltreats his seemingly intelligent and kind wife, all the way to the point of beating her to the ground I m not sure what the symbolism is, although I know it s present in that scene Is Tyszka trying to say that people are subject to humiliation, by oppression or illness, no matter how virtuous they are In full, this is easily going to be in my list of favorites for the year While the subject revolves around illness, it never quite defines which illness is being addressed is it disease regret evil The questions are posed, and only each individual reader can answer

  4. says:

    This was really excellent might ve had a 5 star rating from me, if not for the frequent and unnecessary clumsy literary references This was really excellent might ve had a 5 star rating from me, if not for the frequent and unnecessary clumsy literary references

  5. says:

    Ever since I finished reading this novel, I have been thinking about how I might speak about it What is it about What point does it make How did I experience it Each time I do so, I answer those questions differently, which is, in and of itself, very fascinating to me.So, starting with the obvious, it is a novel about sickness, real and fatal or perceived and just as crippling.It is also a novel about obsession, that of others for us, and that of ourselves turned inwardly.It is about grief, a Ever since I finished reading this novel, I have been thinking about how I might speak about it What is it about What point does it make How did I experience it Each time I do so, I answer those questions differently, which is, in and of itself, very fascinating to me.So, starting with the obvious, it is a novel about sickness, real and fatal or perceived and just as crippling.It is also a novel about obsession, that of others for us, and that of ourselves turned inwardly.It is about grief, always real, about closure, needed and dreaded, about loneliness, inevitable.But it is also a story about compassion and love as one experiences them when nothing else is left.Throughout the book, each character experiences a disintegration of what they held dear, of what made their life and a fraying of the cloak of dignity that they had come to mistake for their identity When all of that crumbles, all that is left is their resplendent humanity And for all of us who have lost a parent or escorted a loved one through the end of life, this is not a novel it is a vessel that contains each and everyone of us alone, and all of us at once

  6. says:

    I didn t like the omniscient narration I didn t like the use of the present tense I didn t like the frequent quoting of other writer s material by the omniscient narrator, in what seemed to be a plucking of bricks from the fourth wall I also didn t find the book that inspired or inspiring However, this latter may be because I read about health and healthcare 5 days a week, and I recognize that others may well find the book both of these things Plus, I did like itas it progressed, and I didn t like the omniscient narration I didn t like the use of the present tense I didn t like the frequent quoting of other writer s material by the omniscient narrator, in what seemed to be a plucking of bricks from the fourth wall I also didn t find the book that inspired or inspiring However, this latter may be because I read about health and healthcare 5 days a week, and I recognize that others may well find the book both of these things Plus, I did like itas it progressed, and I did find it quite a compulsive read, and middlingly poignant I think I d have beenimpressed with it if I d read less of what I ve read at work over the past year Having said that, my annoyances would remain So, three stars

  7. says:

    An intriguing choice of topic for a novel This is a beautiful tender subtle rendering of how illness affects people, how obession is addictive and drives our actions, how knowledge of imenent death affects us and our choices The 4 characters of the novel Dr Javier Miranda, his son Dr Andr s Miranda, medical secretary Karina, and the patient Ernesto Dur n are each afflicted in different ways For Andr s and his father, sickness is tangible, it is cancer, and the subsequent changes that makes to An intriguing choice of topic for a novel This is a beautiful tender subtle rendering of how illness affects people, how obession is addictive and drives our actions, how knowledge of imenent death affects us and our choices The 4 characters of the novel Dr Javier Miranda, his son Dr Andr s Miranda, medical secretary Karina, and the patient Ernesto Dur n are each afflicted in different ways For Andr s and his father, sickness is tangible, it is cancer, and the subsequent changes that makes to ones body For Dur n it is unreal, an illusion but it is also an obsession as he stalks the Dr in order to get attention the drug he needs This he only receives because Katrina takes it upon herself to replay to his emails and in doing so begins at first to empathise and then to mirror Ernesto s symptoms The plot of the story unfortunately runs dry leaving the reader only with the treatise itself, and some loose ends character wise The writing is lovely, itself addictive, the English translation translated by Margaret Jull Costa and shortlisted for Independent Foreign Fiction Prize in 2012 working really well for this reader who finished the novel pondering the big questions about informed consent, telling or not telling patients the truth about their condition and what to do when you are told you have a month to live.ashramblings verdict 3 a mixed reaction to it due to the lack of development of plot and character but I was interested enough by the writing to read another of his novels in the future

  8. says:

    This is a really good short novel On my edition, the blurb sells the book as a stalker thriller, but it isabout people coming to terms with various forms of sickness and how it affects their relationships with each other For something so short, it packs in a lot of pathos and all the characters felt quite real and relatable even the relationship between the obsessive hypochondriac, Ernesto, and the sympathetic medical secretary, Karina I would recommend it to anyone as long as you know This is a really good short novel On my edition, the blurb sells the book as a stalker thriller, but it isabout people coming to terms with various forms of sickness and how it affects their relationships with each other For something so short, it packs in a lot of pathos and all the characters felt quite real and relatable even the relationship between the obsessive hypochondriac, Ernesto, and the sympathetic medical secretary, Karina I would recommend it to anyone as long as you know what to expect There ismelancholy than suspense

  9. says:

    This book is our September book club pick with a theme of Venezuela It was a sad tale of a son dealing with his father s terminal cancer diagnosis while a patient of his, deals with his own sickness It was poignant a times and a quick read full of missed opportunities for the characters as they navigated the end of life.

  10. says:

    A fine translation of an interesting book I am not sure I appreciated its full meaning as I felt there is probably another level beyond the literal story of a doctor, his dying father, his secretary and a hypochondriac Possibly something about the state of Venezuela A thinking book.

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