Buffalo Bird Womans Garden



Buffalo Bird Woman, A Hidatsa Indian Born About 1839, Was An Expert Gardener Following Centuries Old Methods, She And The Women Of Her Family Raised Huge Crops Of Corn, Squash, Beans, And Sunflowers On The Rich Bottomlands Of The Missouri River In What Is Now North Dakota When She Was Young, Her Fields Were Near Like A Fishhook, The Earth Lodge Village That The Hidatsa Shared With The Mandan And Arikara When She Grew Older, The Families Of The Three Tribes Moved To Individual Allotments On The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation.In Buffalo Bird Woman S Garden, First Published In 1917, Anthropologist Gilbert L Wilson Transcribed The Words Of This Remarkable Woman, Whose Advice Today S Gardeners Can Still Follow She Describes A Year Of Activities, From Preparing And Planting The Fields Through Cultivating, Harvesting, And Storing Foods She Gives Recipes For Cooking Typical Hidatsa Dishes And She Tells Of The Stories, Songs, And Ceremonies That Were Essential To A Bountiful Harvest.A New Introduction By Anthropologist And Ethnobotanist Jeffery R Hanson Describes The Hidatsa People S Ecologically Sound Methods Of Gardening And Wilson S Work With This Traditional Gardener.Praise For Buffalo Bird Woman S Garden A Gem Of A Book Useful For Today S Gardener Organic Gardener One Of The Best Gardening Books Around City Pages Every Gardener And Agricultural Scientist Should Find Gems Of Practical Wisdom In These Pages, Borne From An Age Old Tradition When Sustainable Agricultural Practices Made The Difference In Sustaining Life Fascinating Foster S Botanical Herb Review Historical Photographs And Diagrams Of Farming Techniques, Along With Actual Recipes And Hidatsa Vegetable Varieties, Make This Gem Of A Book Useful For Today Gardener Organic GardeningBuffalo Bird Womans Garden

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Buffalo Bird Womans Garden book, this is one of the most wanted Gilbert Livingstone Wilson author readers around the world.

[PDF] ↠ Buffalo Bird Womans Garden  Author Gilbert Livingstone Wilson – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 129 pages
  • Buffalo Bird Womans Garden
  • Gilbert Livingstone Wilson
  • English
  • 23 March 2018
  • 0873512197

10 thoughts on “Buffalo Bird Womans Garden

  1. says:

    I think I could have appreciated itif I had donegardening, especially with the crops she focused on Those were corn, beans, squash, and sunflower seeds, so that is four sisters, not three sisters, but they were doingrow cropping rather than the mounds that have been described.Anyway, I am sure there will be people who can getout of this, but I can still appreciate the value of taking this down and preserving the the memory and knowledge of this woman, as well as the thor I think I could have appreciated itif I had donegardening, especially with the crops she focused on Those were corn, beans, squash, and sunflower seeds, so that is four sisters, not three sisters, but they were doingrow cropping rather than the mounds that have been described.Anyway...

  2. says:

    Gilbert Wilson, a minister turned anthropologist, hit upon a great idea for his Ph.D thesis head off to a nearby Hidatsa village and chat with the elderly about the local Indian traditional agricultural practices, by then 1910 nearly extinct In a stroke of luck his fellow pastor and interpreter s mother turned out to be a terrific source Buffalo Bird Woman Maxi diwiac was a garrulous old woman, with an excellent memory, and sharp and busy enough that she d tried out the newfangled ways Gilbert Wilson, a minister turned anthropologist, hit upon a great idea for his Ph.D thesis head off to a nearby Hidatsa village and chat with the elderly about the local Indian traditional agricultural practices, by then 1910 nearly extinct In a stroke of luck his fellow pastor and interpreter s mother turned out to be a terrific source Buffalo Bird Woman Maxi diwiac was a garrulous old woman, with an excellent memory, and sharp and busy enough that she d tried out the newfangled ways a bit and concluded but of course that the Old Ways Were The Best, and kids these days with their potatoes and hippity hop music and video game consoles and white beans instead of red So glued are they to their cell phones that they are stuck with inferior squash I may be mixi...

  3. says:

    As a gardener and historian, I enjoyed this interview the descriptions are very clear and the photos solidify some of the account Very practical application of ancient methods Fascinating reading A treasure for those wanting to follow in the footsteps of their ancestors.

  4. says:

    I ve been interested in Native American agriculture and subsistence habitsgenerally since I hit on the idea that they could solve the ecological koan I ve been puzzling over for the last six or so months how can we create landscapes that produce tons of diverse and satisfying foods, and at the same time meet the needs of our nature creatures Native peoples solved this problem they maintained a careful balance of wild spaces and cultivated spaces, so that every creature had its place W I ve been interested in Native America...

  5. says:

    It is harvest time.This is an amusing example of someone s PhD dissertation from the turn of the century, bound with a pretty cover and sold in the gift shops of historical sites all over the Midwest Parts of it make very indifferent reading for most people, but overall the appeal is substantial You can tell when Wilson presses Buffalo Bird Woman for details, but it s evident th...

  6. says:

    Anthropologist Gilbert L Wilson transcribed conversations with Buffalo Bird Woman, a Hidatsa American Indian woman from North Dakota She was born around 1839, and the account was published in 1917 It is a lovely and descriptive account of ...

  7. says:

    Reading this book was like being at a retreat I loved having all these experiences with a way of life that includes communal tending, watching and singing to my garden and using tools that come from a deep way of interacting with animals and trees.I was surprised about the way animal poop was not seen as helpful to the garden fertility camefrom having a relationship with each garden, choosing the location near the Missouri River tributary , burning the weeds, and by allowing the land to Reading this book was like being at a retreat I loved having all these experiences with a way of life that includes communal tending, watching and singing to my garden and using tools that come from a deep way of interacting with animals and trees.I was surprised about the way animal poop was not seen as helpful to the garden fertility camefrom having a relationship with each garden, choosing the location near the Missouri River tributary , burning the weeds, and by allowing the land to lie fallow every 2 or 3 years.I was slightly disappointed to find womens ways of working in the garden were not universally respected by men and that boys were among the pests that might harm a garden.I wanted to taste the difference between strings of dried squash and corn and fat cooked in iron or copper kettles compared with food cooked in clay pots, and I wan...

  8. says:

    A mildly interesting book of historic significance I don t garden, so the detailed horticultural methods were of little interest to me More interesting to me were the beliefs around growing techniques and the changes that occurred after contact with whites I was also struck by the description of tobacco use and cultivation, the many different types of corn each with its own use , and the practice of drying squash for the winter I was intrigued by the occasions when Buffalo Bird Woman found A mildly interesting book of historic significance I don t garden, so the detaile...

  9. says:

    This was an incredibly thorough account of traditional agricultural practices and tools used by the Hadatsa tribe in North Dakota This is her account of tribal agricultural practices before and after relocation and it was interesting reading a det...

  10. says:

    A Hidatsa grandmother dictated her gardening and cooking lore to an anthropologist Fascinating reading about the gardening practices of the Hidatsa Indians andthan a few recipes as well Great stuff Who knew that the little ash balls that collect around the edges of a campfire make a good seasoning

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