Rainy Days An Alternative Journey from Pride and Prejudice to Passion and Love



[Read] ➵ Rainy Days An Alternative Journey from Pride and Prejudice to Passion and Love ➼ Lory Lilian – E17streets4all.co.uk In Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth Bennet's first impression and hasty judgment of Mr Darcy, and that gentleman's pride and aloofness toward her loved ones took them on a long, difficult In Jane Austen's An Alternative Kindle Ï Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth Bennet's first impression and hasty judgment of Mr Darcy, and that gentleman's pride and aloofness toward her loved ones took them on a long, difficult road to happiness In Rainy Days, Elizabeth and Mr Darcy are caught in a rainstorm two Rainy Days PDF/EPUB ² days before the Netherfield ball, and they are forced to spend a few hours alone together where they talk, listen, and better understand each other's feelings However, even when original pride and prejudice are overcome, new obstacles arise The road to true love is never smooth, and surprises along Days An Alternative ePUB ↠ the way enhance the passion of the journey Rainy Daysan alternative journey from Pride and Prejudice to passion and love.Rainy Days An Alternative Journey from Pride and Prejudice to Passion and Love

Is a well An Alternative Kindle Ï known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Rainy Days An Alternative Journey from Pride and Prejudice to Passion and Love book, this is one of the most wanted Lory Lilian author readers around the world.

Rainy Days An Alternative Journey from Pride and Prejudice
  • Paperback
  • 396 pages
  • Rainy Days An Alternative Journey from Pride and Prejudice to Passion and Love
  • Lory Lilian
  • English
  • 10 September 2018
  • 9781936009039

10 thoughts on “Rainy Days An Alternative Journey from Pride and Prejudice to Passion and Love

  1. says:

    This book has been on my Wish List for some time. Finally took the plunge and could not put it down.

    The title is used as a cause for ODC to be forced to be together during a torrential rainstorm but also refers metaphorically to some bumps in the road during their courtship.

    Although the author does away with Darcy's prejudices and pride early in the book it is not smooth sailing. He is so romantic in this book...can't keep his hands off Lizzy...but doesn't step over that final line until the wedding night. Every chance he gets he not only gives her sizzling looks, but has to brush against her arm, touch her hand, steal a kiss, etc. His restraint and honor are tested as Lizzy has not a clue about to where all these sensations and emotions can lead. And she is learning to love him where he has abandoned all resistance to that emotion at the onset. The reader is so drawn into being in that moment, knowing and sighing for that final union. The scenes are tender but are for mature readers.

    The author does use a well known snake whom, although she has been warned, Elizabeth allows to unsettle her just enough to rock her calm, her trust. Elizabeth and Darcy have some lessons in complete openness and communication to learn and apply. I like the details in this journey; not only with the thought process but also with the daily lives and interactions with family, acquaintances and servants/staff.

    Darcy's family plays a large role in this story. The story is set for the main part in London so we don't hear a lot from Mrs. Bennet. However, Lydia is as in canon, Jane is more developed as is Bingley's courtship of her, Mr. Bennet comes to know and appreciate Darcy as they interact more frequently. I loved Lady Ellen in this story. Not only does she give Elizabeth a chance upon first meeting her but she is so good at handling her husband, her son and members of the ton. She and Elizabeth reach an understanding early on. And as others have mentioned little Becky Gardiner is precocious. She makes us laugh along with those in her part of the tale.

    This story is one that will be re-read. My only serious quibble is that there is no epilogue but it did have a satisfactory end note.

  2. says:

    Oh, what a beautiful story! This story is an alternative to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. It explores what would have happened if Mr Darcy became aware of Lizzie’s opinion of him while still at Netherfield and then set about changing his behaviour in an attempt to woo Elizabeth right from the beginning.

    My favourite things about this book –

    - The romance, oh the romance! My progress through this book was very slow because I had to keep going back and reading passages over and over again because they were so romantic! And the romantic suspense in the story will have you reading way past your bedtime!

    - Darcy features prominently throughout the book. He is a main character and is not absent from most of the story as he is in Pride & Prejudice.

    - The story is written from both Darcy and Elizabeth’s perspectives, so you don't miss anything.

    - The witty banter between Darcy and Elizabeth throughout the book is a delight to read.

    - The characters from the original Pride & Prejudice are true to form. They have been faithfully portrayed in this story. But as the story develops the focus shifts to different characters and settings than in the original Pride & Prejudice and new characters are introduced. It was very refreshing. I loved seeing Darcy and Elizabeth interact with his family and household staff in London.

    - Darcy, Darcy, Darcy. Read it – you’ll see what I mean!

    Originally read: 24 Feb - 29 Feb 2012
    Reread: 11 Jun 16 - dnf
    Reread 14 Oct 17 -

  3. says:

    This is a sentimental favorite of mine because it was one of the earliest variations of Pride and Prejudice I read. I just finished it for the fourth time. It's not without some faults, but it is a romance I just can't help reading without a lot of deep sighs. Darcy is at his swooniest, Elizabeth displays passionate innocence, and the combo makes for good reading.

    The basic premise is that a sudden and violent storm arises while Elizabeth is walking far from Longbourn. Darcy is unseated from his horse when she prevents him from galloping into a stream in the driving rain. Both must take shelter in a nearby cottage maintained by Mr. Bennet. They are already drenched and, to prevent getting seriously ill, Elizabeth must remove her clothes to dry by the fire, so she's covered by only a blanket. The awkwardness of the situation as they wait out the storm gradually leads to clearing the air between them regarding Wickham as well as Darcy's true opinion of her. By the time they are able to return to Longbourn, the pair is much more comfortable together. Elizabeth trusts him, and Darcy determines to stop fighting his attraction to her.

    Even though Elizabeth now understands that she shouldn't believe Wickham implicitly, he still manages to create difficulties. She continues to get suckered by Wickham's nasty insinuations, and she allows them to adversely affect her. That's one of my pet peeves about this book. It is a repetitive pattern throughout the story that whenever Wickham whispers some little innuendo about Darcy in her ear, Elizabeth gets upset and assumes the worst instead of either recognizing Wickham's deceit or just straight out asking Darcy for his side of the story. It irritates Darcy-- and me!

    However, it does make for fervent reconciliations between ODC, and Darcy manages to find lots of opportunities for alone time with his beloved. They share many stolen kisses and embraces. In all honesty, there are too many to be strictly believable and sometimes their declarations of love become sickly sweet, but it's all nicely written.

    The added characters add the perfect amount of spice to the story. Lady Ellen Matlock, Colonel Fitzwilliam's mother, becomes Elizabeth's formidable ally. It's impossible not to love the Gardiners' youngest daughter, Becky, an adorably precocious child who takes a shine to Mr. Darcy. There are the usual antagonists; Mr. Collins, Lady Catherine and Caroline Bingley join Wickham as irritants trying to split up the couple.

    This is not the very best piece of JAFF, but I can't help but love it because of my personal attachment that goes back 4 years.

  4. says:

    Ummm yeah this book is under 400 pages but it was a slow slow read. While the opening premise was good I found the behaviors of Darcy and Lizzy both like a one dimensional caricature of these beloved characters.

    The first 1/3 of the book is new and unique with Darcy & Lizzy being trapped for several hours in a small cottage, Wickham attending the ball at Netherfield and Jane and Lizzy traveling to London after Christmas.

    Immediately after they arrive Darcy & Bingley pay a call at Gracechurch st. and the remainder of the story is compressed.

    Unfortunately the author seems to have deemed Lizzy to be unstable and angry. Whenever she interacts with Darcy she immediately either fights, weeps or fumes. Darcy is imperious constantly setting down edicts for one and all and then learning he was 'wrong' when Lizzy either crys, fights or glares. Lizzy is constantly questioning herself, believing the worst of Darcy and being neurotic. And all of these issues are resolved by kissing. Detailed descriptions of kissing and moaning and moaning and tingling and ewwwwwww.

    I find myself making the following point in many reviews but in the source material from April until July Lizzy and Darcy did not see each other, could not communicate and were unaware of the others actions. When you place them in daily contact and engaged there is no reason they couldn't talk. It is absurd to expect an engaged couple to treat each other with the same reserved politeness as a non engaged couple.

    The way this Darcy is presented you would almost think he was an abuser and it far from loveable. And if he and Lizzy spent more time talking and less time kissing there would be a basis for their relationship that seems reasonable.

    A good character from this book is a strong, brilliant Lady Matlock.

  5. says:

    Two days before the Netherfield Ball, both Darcy and Elizabeth, taking advantage of the momentary lapse in rain, escape outdoors for a bit of fresh air (Darcy on horseback, Lizzy on foot). But because it is only a momentary lapse, they end up getting caught in a torrential downpour miles away from their respective dwellings. Fortunately, they are nearby an old fishing cottage and decide to seek shelter there together. Although they are protected from the rain and damp, this decision places both their hearts and reputations at perilous risk....

    In this Pride and Prejudice variation, all of the realizations Darcy and Elizabeth make in volumes two and three of Jane Austen's novel, occur in the span of a couple hours.
    - Darcy realizes that Elizabeth has not been flirting with him
    - Elizabeth realizes that Darcy does have some common courtesy and a sense of humor
    - Darcy realizes he must listen to his heart
    - Elizabeth realizes that Wickham's conversation was too personal for so slight an acquaintance

    With Darcy and Elizabeth losing some of their pride and prejudices in the first forty pages, one might wonder what other obstacles and conflicts can Ms. Lilian create to keep the reader engaged for three hundred more pages. Do not worry, dear reader, Darcy and Elizabeth still have their misunderstandings (they're not pictures of perfection you know), and with Caroline Bingley, George Wickham, and Lady Catherine de Bourgh instigating conflicts and voicing their displeasure, Darcy and Elizabeth's battles are far from over!

    To continue reading, go to: http://janeaustenreviews.blogspot.com...

  6. says:

    4.5 stars

  7. says:

    This book has been on my Wish List for some time. Finally took the plunge and could not put it down.

    The title is used as a cause for ODC to be forced to be together during a torrential rainstorm but also refers metaphorically to some bumps in the road during their courtship.

    Although the author does away with Darcy's prejudices and pride early in the book it is not smooth sailing. He is so romantic in this book...can't keep his hands off Lizzy...but doesn't step over that final line until the wedding night. Every chance he gets he not only gives her sizzling looks, but has to brush against her arm, touch her hand, steal a kiss, etc. His restraint and honor are tested as Lizzy has not a clue about to where all these sensations and emotions can lead. And she is learning to love him where he has abandoned all resistance that emotion at the onset. The reader is so drawn into being in that moment, knowing and sighing for that final union. The scenes are tender but are for mature readers.

    The author does use a well known snake whom, although she has been warned, Elizabeth allows to unsettle her just enough to rock her calm, her trust. Elizabeth and Darcy have some lessons in complete openness and communication to learn and apply. I like the details in this journey; not only with the thought process but also with the daily lives and interactions with family, acquaintances and servants/staff.

    Darcy's family plays a large role in this story. The story is set for the main part in London so we don't hear a lot from Mrs. Bennet. However, Lydia is as in canon, Jane is more developed as is Bingley's courtship of her, Mr. Bennet comes to know and appreciate Darcy as they interact more frequently. I loved Lady Ellen in this story. Not only does she give Elizabeth a chance upon first meeting her but she is so good at handling her husband, her son and members of the ton. She and Elizabeth reach an understanding early on. And as others have mentioned little Becky Gardiner is precocious. She makes us laugh along with those in her part of the tale.

    This story is one that will be re-read. My only serious quibble is that there is no epilogue but it did have a satisfactory end note.

  8. says:

    I lost count as to how many times I have read this book. Maybe 20? I don't know. Still one of the best to me. I read it to get ready for The Rainbow Promise sequel.

    Reread again! I would love to know what Mr W did to Darcy's aunt. I don't think we ever find that out in the next book.

    Reread: Love it!

  9. says:

    Rainy Days: From Praise and Enjoyment to Frustration and Disappointment

    Rainy Days by Lory Lilian is an alternate version of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, or put differently, a what-if story. I give this book 5 stars for the first half and 2 stars for the second half. I should have realized what to expect with the word passion being in the subtitle.

    The basic premise of the story is that Elizabeth and Darcy are given a do-over. This tale picks up after the Merryton assembly in P&P and before the Netherfield ball. Elizabeth and Darcy are both caught outside in a terrible rainstorm, and they seek sanctuary in a fishing lodge Mr. Bennet had built a number of years ago. They have the opportunity to get to know each other there, resulting in each one having a different perspective of the other than in the original P&P, which changes the course of events that were in Jane Austen's story.

    What I liked:

    *I loved the story line with Georgianna and how she and Elizabeth were able to become good friends. Georgianna was a character I really wanted to know better in P&P.

    *Lilian does a great job with Darcy and Elizabeth's playful banter, in keeping with Elizabeth's personality in P&P. I have read many P&P alternate stories and sequels in which Elizabeth does not retain her clever dialogue.

    *Lady Matlock is very well done and an awesome addition to the story, and Mr. Bennet's increased prominence is extremely enjoyable.

    What I disliked:

    *There was some head-hopping in the story where the reader is briefly transported into the mind of someone other than Darcy or Elizabeth.

    *I was pretty unhappy with many, many, many kissing scenes in the second half which became more and more physically involved. The end scene shows the marriage being consummated. I ended up going from praise and enjoyment of this book to frustration and disappointment.

    There were lots of moans in the second half of this book, and I felt that the strength of the story was severely watered down by all these scenes. It's difficult for me not to finish a book, especially when I'm more than halfway through, but I probably should have returned this one to the Kindle library rather than completing it.

    Heavy physical components to a historical romance is a dislike for me because I enjoy sweet/clean historical romances, frequently Christian ones. I spend a lot of time reading reviews on the books of untested authors to screen them. Apparently, I did't read enough reviews to catch the abundance of touching in this one. Lory Lilian's writing is well done, but I wish she had limited the physical aspect of the romance to about three kisses and focused more on plot in the second half of the book.

    I'd recommend this book to adults who like Jane Austen fan fiction and bodice-rippers.

  10. says:

    This book started out on the right foot, but somewhere in the middle things went off track for me. I'd rate the first half 4 stars and the second half 1-2 stars, so I averaged it out at 2.5 and rounded up to 3 stars, even though I'm not sure I'd ultimately recommend it--which makes me sad, because there were things I did like. By the time I got to the last 20%, though, I started skimming and wishing I was done.

    The good:

    -The point of variation, where Elizabeth and Darcy get caught in a storm and seek refuge in a cabin together, was nice. And though I genuinely love forced marriage stories, it was a refreshing thing that all involved agreed they could just keep the circumstances secret and not do anything rash.

    -Bingley had some truly spirited moments, and I think my favorite was when (view spoiler)[he was angry with Darcy for getting engaged before him. (hide spoiler)]

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