Encounter



[KINDLE] ❆ Encounter Author Milan Kundera – E17streets4all.co.uk A brilliant new contribution to Kundera s ongoing reflections on art and artists, written with unparalleled insight, authority, and range of reference and allusionMilan Kundera s new collection of ess A brilliant new contribution to Kundera s ongoing reflections on art and artists, written with unparalleled insight, authority, and range of reference and allusionMilan Kundera s new collection of essays is a passionate defense of art in an era that, he argues, no longer values art or beauty With the same dazzling mix of emotion and idea that characterizes his novels, Kundera revisits the artists who remain important to him, and whose works help us better understand the world we live in and what it means to be human An astute reader of fiction, Kundera brings his extraordinary critical gifts to bear on the paintings of Francis Bacon, the music of Leos Janacek, and the films of Federico Fellini, as well as the novels of Philip Roth, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Gabriel Garc a M rquez, among others He also takes up the challenge of restoring to its rightful place the work of Anatole France and Curzio Malaparte, major writers who have fallen into obscurityMilan Kundera s signature themes of memory and forgetting, the experience of exile, and the championing of modernist art are here, along with personal reflections and stories Encounter is a work of great humanism Art is what we possess in the face of evil and the darker side of human nature Elegant, startlingly original, and provocative, Encounter follows in the footsteps of Kundera s earlier essay collections, The Art of the Novel, Testaments Betrayed, and The Curtain.Encounter

Milan Kundera is a Czech and French writer of Czech origin who has lived in exile in France since , where he became a naturalized French citizen in He is best known for The Unbearable Lightness of Being, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting, and The JokeKundera has written in both Czech and French He revises the French translations of all his books these therefore are not considered translations but original works Due to censorship by the Communist government of Czechoslovakia, his books were banned from his native country, and that remained the case until the downfall of this government in the Velvet Revolution of .

Encounter PDF ò Hardcover
    Encounter PDF ò Hardcover idea that characterizes his novels, Kundera revisits the artists who remain important to him, and whose works help us better understand the world we live in and what it means to be human An astute reader of fiction, Kundera brings his extraordinary critical gifts to bear on the paintings of Francis Bacon, the music of Leos Janacek, and the films of Federico Fellini, as well as the novels of Philip Roth, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Gabriel Garc a M rquez, among others He also takes up the challenge of restoring to its rightful place the work of Anatole France and Curzio Malaparte, major writers who have fallen into obscurityMilan Kundera s signature themes of memory and forgetting, the experience of exile, and the championing of modernist art are here, along with personal reflections and stories Encounter is a work of great humanism Art is what we possess in the face of evil and the darker side of human nature Elegant, startlingly original, and provocative, Encounter follows in the footsteps of Kundera s earlier essay collections, The Art of the Novel, Testaments Betrayed, and The Curtain."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 192 pages
  • Encounter
  • Milan Kundera
  • English
  • 18 December 2019
  • 0061894419

10 thoughts on “Encounter

  1. says:

    Czech born author Milan Kundera born 1926 who went into exile in France in 1975 In this collection of short essays, Milan Kundera shares reflections on a number of topics and writers, artists and composers from Francis Bacon, Philip Roth and Juan Goytisolo to Beethoven, Carlos Fuentes, Oscar Milosz and Curzio Malaparte, to name several However, a reader need not be familiar with these artists and writers to benefit from the many wisdom nuggets sprinkled throughout the book s 180 pages As a Czech born author Milan Kundera born 1926 who went into exile in France in 1975 In this collection of short essays, Milan Kundera shares reflections on a number of topics and writers, artists and composers from Francis Bacon, Philip Roth and Juan Goytisolo to Beethoven, Carlos Fuentes, Oscar Milosz and Curzio Malaparte, to name several However, a reader need not be familiar with these artists and writers to benefit from the many wisdom nuggets sprinkled throughout the book s 180 pages As a way of sharing some of Kundera s wisdom and insights, here are a number of quotes from the text along with my modest comments Francis Bacon Triptych of portraits of Henrietta Moraes The painter s gaze comes down on the face like a brutal hand trying to seize hold of her essence, of that diamond hidden in the depths Of course we are not certain that the depths really do conceal something but in any case we each have in us that brutal gesture, that hand movement that roughs up another person s face in hopes of finding, in it and behind it, something that is hidden there Kundera goes on to question to what degree of distortion does a beloved person still remain a beloved person Actually, I myself take a different approach I attempt to seize the hidden true essence of a person not by any brutal gesture but by remaining completely still and listening Usually quite a unique experience for people to be permitted the space to be heard Much different than someone taking their words as a means to insert their own opinions and views The acceleration of history has profoundly transformed individual lives that, in centuries past, used to proceed from birth to death within a single historical period today a life straddles two such periods, sometimesWhereas history used to advance farslowly that human life, nowadays it is history that moves fast, it tears ahead, it slips from a man s grasp, and the continuity, the identity of a life is in danger of cracking apart I myself have lived through a few phases of history Turns out, I love our current international community where we can speak to one another across the globe instantly As for the pre internet, pre Goodreads world where people were cut off from one another and had to filter their reflections and experiences through conventional publishers good riddance There is one aspect of life I have absolute no use for nostalgia My sense is people who rely on nostalgia are asleep to the present, deserving of good whack on the back to wake up to their current life Scarcely 1% of the world s population are childless, but at least 50% of the great literary characters exit the book without having reproduced All Stendhal s protagonists are childless, as are many of Balzac s and Dostoyevsky s and in the century just past, Marcel, the narrator of In Search of Last Time, and of course all of Musil s major characters I suspect the various authors wanted their novel s characters set free to reflect and act in interesting and unusual ways so as to further propel their story None of those mundane tasks of changing dippers, attending their kid s organized sports and dealing with their kid s desires and wants how conventional, unexceptional and boring French novelist Anatole France 1844 1924 The funeral cortege that followed Anatole France to his grave was several kilometers long Then everything changed Aroused by his death, four young Surrealist poets wrote a pamphlet against him As Kundera explains, the surrealists desired a world of pure imagination and poetry, a world of painting of dreams and improbable visions none of that irony, skepticism and seasoned wisdom at the very core of a novel Matter of fact, they dismissed the novel as a prime form of artistic expression When I was a young man, trying to find my way in a world sliding toward the abyss of a dictatorship whose reality no one had foreseen, desired, imagined, especially not the people who had desired and celebrated its arrival, the only book that managed to tell me anything lucid about the unknown world was Anatole France s The Gods Are Thirsty I love how Kundera found refuge in a novel during his own personal time of crisis, during a bleak episode in his country s history A novel can be a second world for us during our own times of crisis, a time when the outer, material, day to day world appears hostile, even sinister In the novels of Anatole France humor is constantly present though always subtle in another book, La R tisserie de la reine P dauque, one can t help enjoying it, but what s humor doing on the bloody terrain of one of the worst tragedies in history Yet that is exactly what is unique, fresh, admirable the skill to resist the nearly obligatory pathos of so somber a subject For only a sense of humor can discern the humorlessness in others I recall how Kierkegaard said that people who lack a sense of humor become an object of humor themselves Actually, the longer I live, the less seriously I take all those very serious people I encounter people who are entirely serious strike me as complete dullards This explains why The Gods Are Thirsty has always been better understood outside France than within it For such is the fate of any novel whose action is too tightly bound to a narrow historical period fellow citizens automatically look for a document of what they themselves experienced or passionately debated they look to see if the novel s image of history matches their own they try to work out the author s political stances, impatient to judge them The surest way to spoil a novel Isn t it curious how many authors find their true audience on the other side of the globe As an American, I am always pleasantly surprised when I read praise and perceptive observations about American authors authors I have no particular love for myself such as John Steinbeck or Ernest Hemingway from readers in such places as India and Japan I say I love Joseph Conrad And my friend says, Me, not so much But are we talking about the same writer I ve read two Conrad novels, he just one, and it s one I don t know And yet each of us, in all innocence in all innocent impertinence , is sure he has an accurate idea of Conrad I enjoy Kundera admitting how he takes his own reading of a famous author as accurate, yet on deeper reflection, acknowledging how his reading and understanding is limited and relatively superficial.Iannis Xenakis 1922 2001 Greek French composer Xenakis does not stand against some earlier phase of music he turns away from all of European music, from the whole of its legacy He locates his starting point somewhere else not in the artificial sound of a note separated from nature in order to express a human subjectivity, but in the noise of the world, in a mass of sound that does not rise from inside the heart but instead comes to us from the outside, like the fall of the rain, the racket of a factory, or the shouts of a mob Kundera notes how Xenakis s face and body were deformed as the consequence of the horrors of war, a deformation that left a permanent record of the insanity of much of world culture on his body, propelling the composer to look elsewhere than tradition for musical inspiration.Vera Linhartova born 1938 Czech writer and art historianIn the 1960s Vera Linhartova was one of the most admired writers in Czechoslovakia, the poetess of a prose that was meditative, hermetic, beyond category Linhartova My sympathies lie with the nomads, I haven t the soul of a sedentary myself So I am now entitled to say that my own exile has fulfilled what was always my dearest wish to live elsewhere When Linhartova writes in French is she still a Czech writer No Does she become a French writer No, not that either She is elsewhere Thus is exile in our post modern world I suspect many who are reading these words consider themselves exiles I myself do not watch TV or read newspapers or listen to pop music, do not go to movies or support a sports team, do not drink or smoke, do not own a car or seek out gossip, thus, in a very real sense, I am an exile to the country and society I have lived in all of my life Ah, the postmodern world

  2. says:

    Une rencontre Encounter, Milan KunderaEncounter originally published March 28, 2009 Milan Kundera s new collection of essays is a passionate defense of art in an era that, he argues, no longer values art or beauty With the same dazzling mix of emotion and idea that characterizes his novels, Kundera revisits the artists who remain important to him and whose works help us better understand the world we live in and what it means to be human An astute reader of fiction, Kundera brings his extr Une rencontre Encounter, Milan KunderaEncounter originally published March 28, 2009 Milan Kundera s new collection of essays is a passionate defense of art in an era that, he argues, no longer values art or beauty With the same dazzling mix of emotion and idea that characterizes his novels, Kundera revisits the artists who remain important to him and whose works help us better understand the world we live in and what it means to be human An astute reader of fiction, Kundera brings his extraordinary critical gifts to bear on the paintings of Francis Bacon, the music of Leos Janacek, and the films of Federico Fellini, as well as the novels of Philip Roth, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Gabriel Garc a M rquez, among others He also takes up the challenge of restoring to its rightful place the work of Anatole France and Curzio Malaparte, major writers who have fallen into obscurity 2014 1392 218 9789643292898 21

  3. says:

    an encounter with my reflections and my recollections, my old themes existential and aesthetic and my old lovesI The Painter s Brutal Gesture On Francis BaconII Novels, Existential SoundingsIII Blacklists, or Divertimento in Homage toAnatole FranceIV The Dream of Total HeritageV Beautiful Like a Multiple EncounterVI ElsewhereVII My First LoveVIII Forgetting SchoenbergIX The Skin Malaparte s Arch Novel

  4. says:

    I was sceptical about Kundera, so decided to read this book of essays I ve been employing this technique for a while now, with mixed results I can t say that he had any particularly revelatory insights into the things discussed, but he was fairly friendly company Most of the pieces in here are only 3 5 pages long and are simply short descriptions of a book so, contrary to someone s suggestion that this can only be enjoyed if you have a thorough knowledge of Eastern European literature, it wou I was sceptical about Kundera, so decided to read this book of essays I ve been employing this technique for a while now, with mixed results I can t say that he had any particularly revelatory insights into the things discussed, but he was fairly friendly company Most of the pieces in here are only 3 5 pages long and are simply short descriptions of a book so, contrary to someone s suggestion that this can only be enjoyed if you have a thorough knowledge of Eastern European literature, it would have been quite frustrating if I had heard of many of these books Luckily there was much that was new to me, and I m happy for the suggestions Other than the discussions of specific books, there are some other short ruminations, most very light on content but with amusing moments The short piece on Brecht which talks about a long and very negative study of his life is particularly enjoyable, the author of said book devoting much time to various rumours from the idea that his plays were written by various girlfriends if they were, he clearly had the most definable type in history to speculation that he was a smelly man Of the longer pieces, the best is on Janacek s operas admittedly the pieces on avant garde European composers might be of little interest to the uninitiated , one of which ends with a passing frog declaring, after being asked what it is doing there, The fuh frog you think you you you re s s seeing isn t me, it s my my grandfather He t told me a lot ab about you Probably the greatest line in anything ever This ending apparently infuriated Max Brod greatly and he tried, thankfully without success, to have Janacek change it.A breezy but surprisingly entertaining book

  5. says:

    My encounter with this book turned out not to be a felicitous one I noticed the book on my library s New Nonfiction shelves and took it since I love Kundera and this was the only one of his books I hadn t heard of The failure of my relationship with this book was probably not due to a failing on the writer s part Most of the essays were either about writers and artists who I hadn t read or whose work I don t like Francis Bacon, the surrealists, Rabelais Alas, not a match made in heaven.

  6. says:

    I ve long enjoyed Kundera s literary essays, eventhan his novels He s one of those rare authors worth reading for his opinions alone.This latest collection, however, is a bit slight Most of the essays are quite short, a pr cis of Kundera s points of view but littleas if he s said all he had to say about literature in The Art of the Novel and the excellent Testaments Betrayed. He s at his best when championing authors and artists mostly forgotten.For me, the best is the final chap I ve long enjoyed Kundera s literary essays, eventhan his novels He s one of those rare authors worth reading for his opinions alone.This latest collection, however, is a bit slight Most of the essays are quite short, a pr cis of Kundera s points of view but littleas if he s said all he had to say about literature in The Art of the Novel and the excellent Testaments Betrayed. He s at his best when championing authors and artists mostly forgotten.For me, the best is the final chapter on the astonishing Curzio Malaparte author of Kaputt and The Skin. I bought Kaputt a few years ago one of those books I started the day I bought it, then set aside Kundera has inspired me to dig it out of the book closet and start again I suspect I ll always be grateful for the reminder

  7. says:

    an encounter with my reflections and my recollections, my old themes existential and aesthetic and my old loves .Still obsessed by recollections of the country which I had just left and which still remained in my memory as a land of interrogations and surveillance on Francis Bacon The painter s gaze comes down on the face like a brutal hand trying to seize hold of her essence on Picasso It is the painter s light gesture that transformed elements of the human body into a two dimensan encounter with my reflections and my recollections, my old themes existential and aesthetic and my old loves .Still obsessed by recollections of the country which I had just left and which still remained in my memory as a land of interrogations and surveillance on Francis Bacon The painter s gaze comes down on the face like a brutal hand trying to seize hold of her essence on Picasso It is the painter s light gesture that transformed elements of the human body into a two dimensional fromBut what is hidden there in portrait Its self The faces are lamentably alikeBacon s portraits are an interrogation on the limits of the selfFor a long time Bacon and Beckett made up a couple in my imaginary gallery of modern artWhen one artist talks about another, he is always talking of himselfAn accidental splotch of color that abruptly changes the very subject of the picture Bacon In painting we always leave in too much that is habitBacon often spied on that workshop of the CreatorStudies of Human Body he unmasks the body as an accident that could as easily have been put together some other wayThe face I gaze upon to seek in it a reason for living the senseless accident that is life Iceland solitude spying on each otherTo understand another person means to understand his current ageThe enigma of age one of those themes only a novel can illuminate She imagines her body dissolving and disappearing in the blue Forgetting great bottomless hole where memory drainsMost protagonists of great novels do not have childrenChildren are your immortalityWith One Hundred Years of Solitude, the art of the novel seems to emerge from the dream The center of the dream is no longer an individual but a procession of individualsOne Hundred Years of Solitude apotheosis of the art of the novel, at the same time a farewell to the age of the novelHistory is nothing but a long string of variations Memory feels no obligation to truthMemory did not feel guilty of any lieCzech nation is not immortal that it too could cease to exist Xenakis His music reconciled me to the inevitability of endings James Joyce the prophet of unfeelingness Jonas awakes one morning to find the world around him empty, without humansEverything that can exist nation, thought, music can also not existEncounter not a social relation, not a friendship, not even an allianceAn encounter, which is to say a spark, a lightning flash random chanceMartinique the encounter of a great cultural complexity with a great solitudeWarm golden color represents an unattainable happinessAlone like the moon nobody seesExile as LiberationLinhartova toward another place, an elsewhere, by definition unknown and open to all sorts of possibilities So I chose the place where I wanted to live, but I have also chosen the language I wanted to speak When Linhartova writes in French, is she still a Czech writer NoDoes she become a Frech writer No, not that eitherShe is elsewhereThe Untouchable Solitude of a Foreigner Oscar Milosz Nostalgia that is expressed not by the past but by the future Bohumil Hrabal he was profoundly apolitical In a regime for which everything was political First attitude political struggle isimportant than real life, than art, then thoughtSecond attitude whole meaning of politics is to serve real life, art, thoughtThere is nothingfoolish than to sacrifice friendship to politics Danilo Kis he was the most invisiblebastard writer out of the swallowed up world of Central EuropeHe was able to grasp the most harrowing aspect individual fates no sooner born than abandoned tragedies with no vocal cordsParis s May, brought about primarily by the initiative of the young, was marked by revolutionary lyricismPrague s Spring was inspired by the postrevolutionary skepticism of adultsCzech nation was born not because of its military intervention but because of its literatureI don t mean literature as a political weapon I mean literature as literatureMy native land land of Baroque churches, of Baroque cemeteries, of Baroque statues, with its obsession with death, its obsession with the departing body that no longer a bodyJanacek musical essence of old age is that bottomless nostalgia for time that is goneNostalgia It determines not only the climate of the work, but even its architectureJanacek managed to say what only an opera can say The unbearable nostalgia of insignificant talk at an innThe music becomes the fourth dimension of a situation which without it would be remain anodyne, unnoticed, muteIt is only the music that allows to see the hidden painIn Janacek the emotions are no less intense, but they are highly concentrated and brief The world is a carousal where feelings spin past, revolve, give way to othersElegiac nostalgia the sublime, eternal subject of music and of poetryThis nostalgia is terribly real, it is to be found where no one looks for itForgetting Schoenberg Camera the principle agent of stupidityWe have come to the era of post art, in a world where art is dyingTelevised films interrupted by advertisement confrontation between film as art and film as an agent of stupidityA hundred years of cinema Yes But I m not celebratingEurope was moving into the age of the prosecutors A long succession of events whose deceptive surface is meant to hide SinDeath is everywhere in this chapterThe moon it shines above all the landscapes of the book

  8. says:

    the essays are connected by existential musings, the detestable European existential crisis they built upon themselves, the white supremacy, wars, massacres, bewailing what they have already done to humanity, the essays show how pukish European civilization can be, and how things are still being repeated, Trump s win , things which an outsider could not relate to and always reminding me of how bad power could be and how terrifying it was connecting with centuries old tales of European white the essays are connected by existential musings, the detestable European existential crisis they built upon themselves, the white supremacy, wars, massacres, bewailing what they have already done to humanity, the essays show how pukish European civilization can be, and how things are still being repeated, Trump s win , things which an outsider could not relate to and always reminding me of how bad power could be and how terrifying it was connecting with centuries old tales of European white supremacy over other people, throughout the world, the massacres there are subtleties in discussion, many ideas, people, Nazis, communism, dictatorships, some beautiful, some worse,for eg discussion on Marquez without considering the anti European politics

  9. says:

    I still prefer to call Milan Kundera the essayist His essays are always better than his novels to me, maybe because his novel isspeaking itself from a physical point of view But essays seemintelligent As Kundera says, criticizing others judging others is a way of expressing oneself Still, he loathes collectivists and totalitarianism, still he interests Musics, still he is a little bit depressed He is calling for a past feelings, those good old days, when people still look up int I still prefer to call Milan Kundera the essayist His essays are always better than his novels to me, maybe because his novel isspeaking itself from a physical point of view But essays seemintelligent As Kundera says, criticizing others judging others is a way of expressing oneself Still, he loathes collectivists and totalitarianism, still he interests Musics, still he is a little bit depressed He is calling for a past feelings, those good old days, when people still look up into the sky, when Europa is still clean and peaceful The reminiscing of the past.I love the elsewhere part the most Being going through all kinds of uncertainty and non existial experience as well as exile, he could understand deeply the feeling of being elsewhere Being a Solino When one left one s home country, not because one stops loving it, but has to do it It s sad And then being a foreigner in another country where suppose to be better than the previous one, or the one that doesn t even exist That s the dilemma No matter how fluent they speak another language, they are rooted with their father tongue A heart straying elsewhere Longing for home land

  10. says:

    I m going to give this three stars I can t believe I m going to give Kundera three stars, but I am And it physically hurts me I was sure of this rating midway through, because his analysis of the works he was discussing was a little thin The essays of the second half were stronger, and almost managed to bump this collection to four stars Ultimately though, this Kundera was short on Kundera It was heavy on summary of other artists, and light on his application and interpretation For the mo I m going to give this three stars I can t believe I m going to give Kundera three stars, but I am And it physically hurts me I was sure of this rating midway through, because his analysis of the works he was discussing was a little thin The essays of the second half were stronger, and almost managed to bump this collection to four stars Ultimately though, this Kundera was short on Kundera It was heavy on summary of other artists, and light on his application and interpretation For the most part, these essays were weaker than those in The Curtain, and certainly than those in The Art of the Novel and Testaments Betrayed Kundera is still a man with things to say, and when he looks back on history his observations are so acutepart of my response to this collection is no doubt because I want another Kundera novel

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