Quatre-Vingt-Treiz



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Victor Hugo, in full Victor Marie Hugo, poet, playwrighter, novelist, dramatist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France, who was the most important of the French Romantic writers Though regarded in France as one of that country s greatest poets, he is better known abroad for such novels as Notre Dame de Paris 1831 and Les Mis rables 1862.

[Read] ➵ Quatre-Vingt-Treiz Author Victor Hugo – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 264 pages
  • Quatre-Vingt-Treiz
  • Victor Hugo
  • English
  • 12 October 2019
  • 1103694952

10 thoughts on “Quatre-Vingt-Treiz

  1. says:

    The French Revolution was not simply capturing the Bastille and living happily ever after As with all revolutions, there were unexpected results One of these became known as the Reign Of Terror, lasting from September 1793 to July 1794 Victor Hugo deals with this painful topic in his final novel, Ninety Three.I m so close to speechless I can only say that every single person on the planet should read this book now.

  2. says:

    An incredibly realistic Painting of the French Revolution.Some might say it s not realistic, it s pure fantasy, it s much too lyric an passionate, and much too orientated in favor of the revolutionnaries indeed, it s only a novel, BUT it s realistic because it shows every aspects of this revolution, and that s precisely because it s lyric that you can understand it A revolution cannot be described by facts, but by presenting the storm, the hates, the men, in one word by showing that amazi An incredibly realistic Painting of the French Revolution.Some might say it s not realistic, it s pure fantasy, it s much too lyric an passionate, and much too orientated in favor of the revolutionnaries indeed, it s only a novel, BUT it s realistic because it shows every aspects of this revolution, and that s precisely because it s lyric that you can understand it A revolution cannot be described by facts, but by presenting the storm, the hates, the men, in one word by showing that amazing race between opponents, between men from the old world the nobles and men from the new world revolutionaries intellectuals and armymen , this race where you ll lose your head at any mistake, because you don t have the right to fail, because if you re weak the King i.e injustice, torture, fanatism will be back soon If you re not French and believe that the Revolution was all about Robespierre s terror if you believe that it was only a bunch of farmers blindly cutting heads, then read this book, you ll understand how wrong you are You ll get the soul of this Revolution.Last but not least, this novel is written in a very epic manner, so it s very pleasant to read.PS I don t know if an English translation of the book would be very good, because Victor Hugo is the French writer

  3. says:

    Free download available at Project Gutenberg.Translator Aline DelanoRelease Date July 6, 2015 EBook 49372 Language EnglishProduced by Laura N.R and Marc D Hooghe at Images generously madeavailable by the Hathi Trust and by Gallica Biblioth que nationale de France for the illustrations This book has several translations but we found only this one, made by Aline Delano, to becloser to the original French text She also translated from the Russian the Free download available at Project Gutenberg.Translator Aline DelanoRelease Date July 6, 2015 EBook 49372 Language EnglishProduced by Laura N.R and Marc D Hooghe at Images generously madeavailable by the Hathi Trust and by Gallica Biblioth que nationale de France for the illustrations This book has several translations but we found only this one, made by Aline Delano, to becloser to the original French text She also translated from the Russian the following books The Blind Musician by Vladimir Korolenko The Kingdom of God is Within You, What is Art, by Leo Tolstoy.The original file was provided by Hathi Trust Digital Library.Critical Note by Robert L Stevenson from The Works of Victor Hugo, Vol VII, Jefferson Press, 190 In Notre Dame, Les Miserables, The Toilers of the Sea and The Man Who Laughs, one after another, there has been some departure from the traditional canons of romance but taking each separately, one would have feared to make too much of these departures, or to found any theory upon what was per haps purely accidental The appearance of Ninety Three has put us out of the region of such doubt Like a doctor who has long been hesitating how to classify an epidemic malady, we have come at last upon a case so well marked that our uncertainty is at an end It is a novel built upon a sort of enigma, which was at that date laid before revolutionary France, and which is presented by Hugo to Tellmarch, to Lantenac, to Gauvain, and very terribly to Cimourdain, each of whom gives his own solution of the question, clement or stern, according to the temper of his spirit That enigma was this Can a good action be a bad action Does not he who spares the wolf kill the sheep This question as I say, meets with one answer after another during the course of the book, and yet seems to remain undecided to the end And something in the same way, although one character, or one set of characters, after another comes to the front and occupies our attention for the moment, we never identify our interest with any of these temporary heroes nor regret them after they are withdrawn Page 12 I was in Paris on the 10th of August I gave Westerman a drink Everything went with a rush in those days I saw Louis XVI guillotined, Louis Capet, as they call him I tell you he did n t like it You just listen now To think that on the 13th of January he was roasting chestnuts and enjoying himself with his family When he was made to lie down on what is called the see saw, he wore neither coat nor shoes only a shirt, a quilted waistcoat, gray cloth breeches, and gray silk stockings I saw all that with my own eyes.Page 60 This man who is among us represents the king He has been intrusted to our care we must save him He is needed for the throne of France As we have no prince, he is to be, at least we hope so, the leader of the Vend e He is a great general He was to land with us in France now he must land without us If we save the head we save all Page 135 136 93 is the war of Europe against France, and of France against Paris What then is Revolution It is the victory of France over Europe, and of Paris over France Hence the immensity of that terrible moment 93, grander than all the rest of the century Nothing could betragic Europe attacking France, and France attacking Paris, a drama with the proportions of an epic.Page 139 The Gironde, speaking in the person of Isnard, temporary president of the Convention, had uttered this appalling prophecy Parisians, beware for in your city not one stone shall be left resting upon another, and the day will come when men will search for the place where Paris once stood This speech had given Birth to the v ch.Page 209 At the time when the death sentence of Louis XVI was passed, Robespierre had eighteen months to live, Danton fifteen, Vergniaud nine, Marat five months and three weeks, and Lepelletier Saint Fargeau one day Brief and terrible was the breath of life in those days.Page 218 Revolution is a manifestation of the unknown You may call it good or evil, according as you aspire to the future or cling to the past but leave it to its authors It would seem to be the joint product of great events and great individualities, but is in reality the result of events alone Events plan the expenditures for which men pay the bills Events dictate, men sign The 14th of July was signed by Camille Desmoulins, the 10th of August by Danton, the 2d September by Marat, the 21st of September by Gr goire, and the 21st of January by Robespierre but Desmoulins, Danton, Marat, Gr goire, and Robespierre are merely clerks.Page 305 Liberty, equality, fraternity, these are the dogmas of peace and harmony Why give them so terrible an aspect What are we striving to accomplish To bring all nations under one universal republic Well, then, let us not terrify them Of what use is intimidation Neither nations nor birds can be attracted by fear We must not do evil that good may come We have not overturned the throne to leave the scaffold standing Death to the king, and life to the nations Let us strike off the crowns, but spare the heads Revolution means concord, and not terror Schemes of benevolence arc but poorly served by merciless men Amnesty is to me the grandest wordin human language I am opposed to the shedding of blood, save as I risk my own Still, I am but asoldier I can do nothan fight Yet if we are to lose the privilege of pardoning, of what use is itto conquer Let us be enemies, if you will, in battle but when victory is ours, then is the time to bebrothers Page 467 Was it then the object of Revolution to destroy the natural affections, to sever all family ties, and to stifle every sense of humanity Far from it The dawn of 89 came to affirm those higher truths, and not to deny them The destruction of bastiles signified the deliverance of humanity the overthrow of feudalism was the signal for the building up of the family.Page 486 The genius of France was made up from that of the entire continent, and each of its provinces represents aspecial virtue of Europe the frankness of Germany is to be found in Picardy, the generosity of Swedenin Champagne, the industry of Holland in Burgundy, the activity of Poland in Languedoc, the grave dignityof Spain in Gascony, the wisdom of Italy in Provence, the subtlety of Greece in Normandy, the fidelity of Switzerland in Dauphiny.Page 505 Grand events are taking form No one can comprehend the mysterious workings of revolution at the present time Behind the visible achievement rests the invisible, the one concealing the other The visible work seems cruel the invisible is sublime At this moment I can see it all very clearly It is strange and beautiful We have been forced to use the materials of the Past Hence this wonderful 93 Beneath a scaffolding of barbarism weare building the temple of civilization

  4. says:

    This completes for me the trio of novels that tell of the conflict between the Royalist resistance in Brittany and the Republican Revolutionaries after the beheading of Louis XVI I think I serendipitously read them in the right order, which happens to be in publication order The Chouans, by Balzac, La Vendee by Trollope, and this by Hugo They each have a somewhat different perspective.The middle part of this was a slog, but it was sandwiched between two parts that were compelling The slogg This completes for me the trio of novels that tell of the conflict between the Royalist resistance in Brittany and the Republican Revolutionaries after the beheading of Louis XVI I think I serendipitously read them in the right order, which happens to be in publication order The Chouans, by Balzac, La Vendee by Trollope, and this by Hugo They each have a somewhat different perspective.The middle part of this was a slog, but it was sandwiched between two parts that were compelling The sloggy part feltlike nonfiction and included lots of names with which I was unfamiliar, but were probably part of any history learned in school in France I suspect many both US and others might just as easily be unfamiliar with the minor players of the US Revolution But the major players made up a part of this section, too, and one in particular, Cimourdain, was instrumental to the exciting third part 93 is a year of intense action The tempest is there in all its wrath and grandeur Cimourdain felt himself in his element This scene of distraction, wild and magnificent, suited the compass of his outspread wings Like a sea eagle, he united a profound inward calm with a relish for external danger.And the Head of the Committee of Public Safety, Robespierre, tells us Listen, Danton foreign war is as nothing compared with the dangers of civil war A foreign war is like a scratch on the elbow, but civil war is an ulcer which eats away your liver Here is the sum and substance of all that I have just read to you the Vend e, which has hitherto been divided among many chiefs, is about to concentrate its forces Henceforth it is to have one leader Although I highlighted a bitelsewhere, this was enough to set the stage for this novel and the conflict it describes Hugo felt compelled to a bitphilosophizing than I like in a novel If I werea student of the French Revolution, and especially this period of the Reign of Terror, I might have appreciated itAs it is, this sits on the border between 3 and 4 stars The compelling parts are enough to nudge it up

  5. says:

    I have read that the English translation is not nearly as good as the original French but the only French I know is French fry , so I had to settle Not that that is a bad thing because in my opinion this was still a great classic from Hugo This was the final work of the author of such masterpieces as Les Miserables and The Hunchback of Notre Dame, telling of the French revolution of 1793 Admittedly, I had never heard of the book and only know about it because I came across an old copy of i I have read that the English translation is not nearly as good as the original French but the only French I know is French fry , so I had to settle Not that that is a bad thing because in my opinion this was still a great classic from Hugo This was the final work of the author of such masterpieces as Les Miserables and The Hunchback of Notre Dame, telling of the French revolution of 1793 Admittedly, I had never heard of the book and only know about it because I came across an old copy of it in an antique book shop And I m glad I did because it is another wonderful piece of classic literature for my collection

  6. says:

    view spoiler Bettie s Books hide spoiler view spoiler Bettie s Books hide spoiler

  7. says:

    What an amazing novel Beautifully crafted, I love the narrative, with the characters standing in as avatars for ideas, and interplay with symmetry and contrasts between the various characters and ideas Easy to mess up such a dynamic by rendering it too simplistically, but I think Hugo infuses a great level of nuance and subtlety to the enterprise helping ensure his novel doesn t turn into a 1 dimensional parody Personally I love the stylization of the writing, lyrical and poetic, and so much What an amazing novel Beautifully crafted, I love the narrative, with the characters standing in as avatars for ideas, and interplay with symmetry and contrasts between the various characters and ideas Easy to mess up such a dynamic by rendering it too simplistically, but I think Hugo infuses a great level of nuance and subtlety to the enterprise helping ensure his novel doesn t turn into a 1 dimensional parody Personally I love the stylization of the writing, lyrical and poetic, and so much fantastic imagery really this part is just awesome Sometimes the 19th century novel goes a bit bonkers with meandering descriptions of geography, place, customs, objects This can be kind of obnoxious, but this book only has a few such moments and I really don t mind as the quality of the writing and story are too good But these meanderings in the 19th century novel are just one of those things I try to buttress myself against, I usually don t mind so much but sometimes it is an avalanche of words that doesn t advance plot or character at least doesn t seem to in my eyes and try as I might it can break my patience Like I said though, this book only has a few such moments, and usually when this is happening it involves a broader metaphor that seems to make sense for developing the story and message of the book.This story takes place with the historical backdrop of the French Revolution year 1793, as the Terror is getting under way It pits two opposing forces, revolutionary and reactionary Progressive vs traditional Duality is featured throughout the book And yet there is nuance to the political analysis and views And the historical background was very interesting and informative for me some of the interesting alliances including reactionary alliance between nobles rural poor paysans catholic elements vs revolutionaries emanating from various segments of city society Of course this wasn t all cut and dry, but there were interesting linkages going on, and internecine struggles for supremacy between the subgroups on each side The story seems to capture an essence of the times, intertwining legend with history and in doing so approaching a kind of truth that can be hard for one or the other to achieve on its own This seems to be a theme with Hugo, or at least a manifestation of his philosophy, by combining legend story with history we can approach a greater truth But this is the first book of his I ve read so I can t make a strong statement on that, just a guess and intuition Hugo strikes me as a humanist who likely had deep sympathies for progressive ideals but he also fairly represents how high ideals can lead to the greatest crimes, with idealists leveraging the excuse of noble ends to justify execrable means Sidestepping accountability and responsibility because one s ideals are so noble and just This critique is applied to both reactionaries and revolutionaries in this story as we see various characters in both camps guilty of this, some of whom stoop to the lowest basest most cynical self serving justifications for their commitment of crimes against their fellow man But there is nuance and subtlety, both in the writing and also the representation of the characters Some characters are presented in afavorable light than others, but never as pure black or white entities The moral dilemmas the characters face are great, each individual is anchored by their various strain of idealism These ideals get smashed and tested against the vortex of reality with crosscurrents tugging the individuals this way and that, each struggle further revealing inner character and nuance of each personI would recommend this book for two reasons first off the magnificent quality of the writing and storytelling 2ndly the fascinating historical backdrop and information in this book that seems to capture the essence and complexities of this particular historical period And I could add a 3rd experiencing Hugo and his sublime sensibility and ideas Cannot wait to readI m thinking Les Mis, this will be a grand project, maybe later in the year I ll try it out I can t read as fast in French or with quite as high a comprehension level as in English but it is a fun challenge , so it will be a doubly huge undertaking if I end up going for it But I think I m falling in love with Hugo s style It is ornamented a certain way, grand and architectured to a high degree, so certainly not for everyone I m guessing he might be one of those love it or hate it kind of writers for people , but it appeals to me and my tastes Quote L homme peut, comme le ciel, avoir une s r nit noire il suffit que quelque chose fasse en lui la nuit La pr trise avait fait la nuit dans Cimourdain Qui a t pr tre l est Ce qui fait la nuit en nous peut laisser en nous les toiles Cimourdain tait plein de vertus et de v rit s, mais qui brillaient dans les t n bres

  8. says:

    I cannot believe I originally gave this book three out of five stars What a humbug I have just listened to the audiobook again, and now starting it all over again.and I m totally enthralled by it I think I had expected something different from the outset As rambling as Les Mis is in passages, yet there will never be another character such as Jean Valjean, and I think I was expecting it but 93 is different, and rightly so On first reading, certain passages the literally loose can I cannot believe I originally gave this book three out of five stars What a humbug I have just listened to the audiobook again, and now starting it all over again.and I m totally enthralled by it I think I had expected something different from the outset As rambling as Les Mis is in passages, yet there will never be another character such as Jean Valjean, and I think I was expecting it but 93 is different, and rightly so On first reading, certain passages the literally loose cannon the mother and children seemed a bit random and disjointed, and neither was I expecting that it should so deal with the counterrevolution in the Vendee too, as much as I Loved reading a scene containing Robespierre, Danton and Marat all together, it seemed to readlike an allegorical play at times, than a novel I am the man of the tenth of August etc..What I didn t feel at the first reading, and which I do now, is that it really is indeed like an Allegory of the Revolution, and especially of that tumultuous year, 1793 the year that Marat was to be murdered and the year of Terror to begin Hugo is trying to grapple with both the beauty and hideousness of the revolution, as embodied in three characters the counterrevolutionary Marquis de Lantenac monarchy the old regime Cimourdain the ruthless justice of the Revolution and Gauvain the nobler and purer spirit of the Revolution the ideal But I need to stop here.I ll just say again that it seems to me one of those books that growinteresting and beautiful over timeand, at the very least, food for thought in it s portrait of revolution, and in those truths which soar above an earthly justice

  9. says:

    Not easy, reviewing this Parts of this book were stunning, absolutely beautiful and then there were the rants A lot of rants, a lot of lists of names Hugo does this in his other books too, but he seemed to go overboard here And the whole bit with Robespierre Marat Danton, I just couldn t make myself be interested But then, the chapter The Massacre of Saint Bartholomew where Hugo describes a day with the three toddlers on which the whole story hinges Lovely, lovely, lovely And all w Not easy, reviewing this Parts of this book were stunning, absolutely beautiful and then there were the rants A lot of rants, a lot of lists of names Hugo does this in his other books too, but he seemed to go overboard here And the whole bit with Robespierre Marat Danton, I just couldn t make myself be interested But then, the chapter The Massacre of Saint Bartholomew where Hugo describes a day with the three toddlers on which the whole story hinges Lovely, lovely, lovely And all with the background of brutality and impending doom Hugo knows just how to drive a knife into our hearts.It s worth the read Not my favorite of his works, by any means, but Hugo is a giant among writers and cannot be dismissed without loss to the reader What a bird sings, a child prattles It is the same hymn An indistinct hymn, lisped, profound The child,than the bird, has the mysterious destiny of man before it Hence, the melancholy feeling of those who listen, mingled with the joy of the little one who sings The sublimest song to be heard on the earth is the lisping of the human soul on the lips of children This confused whispering of a thought, which is yet only an instinct, contains a strange, unconscious appeal to eternal justice perhaps it is a protestation on the threshold, before entering a humble but poignant protestation this ignorance smiling at the Infinite compromises all creation in the fate which is to be given to the feeble, helpless being Misfortune, if it comes, will be an abuse of confidence.The murmur of a child isor less than speech there are no notes, and yet it is a song there are no syllables, and yet it is a language this murmur had its beginning in heaven, and will not have its end on earth it is before birth, and it will continue hereafter Hugo spends a fair bit of time describing the children s playing together, absolutely innocent and unaware that the room they have been locked in has been rigged to a fuse which will set alight a trail of tar It s this kind of contrast horror against innocence and beauty, that makes Hugo a master

  10. says:

    The psychology in this book makes it worth the read People simply don t write like this anyHugo takes us through the minds of the several characters with depth and a beauty of words that make classic authors so great What keeps this from being perhaps one of his better known novels is that it is very contemporary to its time if you are unfamiliar with the many referenced characters, you will easily become lost or bored If you can focus on the beauty of the characters development, and The psychology in this book makes it worth the read People simply don t write like this anyHugo takes us through the minds of the several characters with depth and a beauty of words that make classic authors so great What keeps this from being perhaps one of his better known novels is that it is very contemporary to its time if you are unfamiliar with the many referenced characters, you will easily become lost or bored If you can focus on the beauty of the characters development, and enjoy the historical lesson of the French Revolution portrayed vividly on both sides, you will love this

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