Die Räuber



[PDF / Epub] ☁ Die Räuber Author Friedrich Schiller – E17streets4all.co.uk Mit seinem erschienenen leidenschaftlichen Drama der Selbtstzerst rung einer Familie machte Schiller bei der Urauff hrung am Mannheimer Nationaltheater Sensation Fortan galt er den Zeitgenossen als Mit seinemerschienenen leidenschaftlichen Drama der Selbtstzerst rung einer Familie machte Schiller bei der Urauff hrung am Mannheimer NationaltheaterSensation Fortan galt er den Zeitgenossen als ein deutscher Shakespeare Die Themen und Motive des Sturm und Drang St cks blieben f r Schiller bis zu seinen letzen klassischen Werken verbindlich und haben bis heute nichts von ihrer Faszination verloren.Die Räuber

Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller November , May , was a German poet, philosopher, historian, and dramatist During the last few years of his life , Schiller struck up a productive, if complicated, friendship with already famous and influential Johann Wolfgang Goethe, with whom he greatly discussed issues concerning aesthetics, encouraging Goethe to finish works he left merely as sketches this thereby gave way to a period now referred to as Weimar Classicism They also worked together on Die Xenien The Xenies , a collection of short but harshly satiric poems in which both Schiller and Goethe verbally attacked those persons they perceived to be enemies of their aesthetic agenda.

Die Räuber eBook ò Paperback
  • Paperback
  • 176 pages
  • Die Räuber
  • Friedrich Schiller
  • German
  • 14 January 2018
  • 3150000157

10 thoughts on “Die Räuber

  1. says:

    ACT I everybody lies ACT II everybody cries ACT III everybody fights ACT IV everybody panics ACT V everybody dies gotta love German literature

  2. says:

    I wish I had first read this years ago when I was writing my undergraduate dissertation on The Brothers Karamazov Dostoevsky explicitly has old man Karamazov refer to Dmitri and Ivan as the two sons from the play, a not entirely fair comparison but perhaps the novel is Dostovesky s translation of the family dynamic and the rejection of society from Schiller s play into his own world vision.Books are invariably incomplex relationships with each other, and I felt if the Karamazovs were look I wish I had first read this years ago when I was writing my undergraduate dissertation on The Brothers Karamazov Dostoevsky explicitly has old man Karamazov refer to Dmitri and Ivan as the two sons from the play, a not entirely fair comparison but perhaps the novel is Dostovesky s translation of the family dynamic and the rejection of society from Schiller s play into his own world vision.Books are invariably incomplex relationships with each other, and I felt if the Karamazovs were looking back at the Moors that they in turn were modelled on Shakespeare s Edmund and Edgar from King Lear The other thought that occurred to me was that Max Weber would have liked this the ersatz brotherhood of the Robber band as a purely male endeavour which becomes an alternative counter society but one from the first caught up in ideas of violenceStelle mich vor ein Heer Kerls wie ich, und aus Deutschland soll eine Republik werden gegen die Rom und Sparta Nonnenkloester sein sollen p.23 , not sure quite why one would want to model one s republic on Rome or Sparta, indeed so much violence that the love sub plot becomes impossible view spoiler I think I just about avoided making a spoiler, I can wipe my forehead with relief hide spoiler rather than allowing a return to a heterosexual model of sociability.The play perhaps confirmation bias had the feel of a young writer and promised the melodrama and moustache twirling of popular theatre which then lay in the future

  3. says:

    The Robbers by Friedrich Schiller was first published in 1781 Is it the earliest German book that I have ever read Possibly I first got to know about it when I read the book German Literature A Very Short Introduction by Nicholas Boyle This is what Boyle says about Schiller s playa rebellious schoolboy in Stuttgart, Friedrich Schiller, began drafting the definitive treatment of the theme, his first play, The Robbers , which took the reading public by storm on its publication in 17 The Robbers by Friedrich Schiller was first published in 1781 Is it the earliest German book that I have ever read Possibly I first got to know about it when I read the book German Literature A Very Short Introduction by Nicholas Boyle This is what Boyle says about Schiller s playa rebellious schoolboy in Stuttgart, Friedrich Schiller, began drafting the definitive treatment of the theme, his first play, The Robbers , which took the reading public by storm on its publication in 1781, and reduced its audience to sobs and swoons when it was first performed the following year A modern, international audience can still be gripped by the story of Karl and his band, a prescient analysis of the logic of self righteous terrorism in a moral void The huge success of the play in Germany in its own time and subsequently was no doubt due to the ferocity with which it dramatized the conflict between the two value systems available to the middle class in its struggle against princely rule self interested materialism or university educated idealism while it left prudently unassailed the structure of power itself Schiller focused, with the penetrating clarity of a born dramatist, on the political and moral fault lines in his contemporary society With The Robbers an independent modern German literary tradition begins How can you resist a description like that Since I read that, I have wanted to read The Robbers I managed to squeeze it in yesterday, on the last day of this year s German Literature Month Here is what I think The Robbers is about two brothers Karl and Franz Karl is the eldest son and so is the natural heir to his father s estates Their father loves Karl Everyone does Karl is also engaged to a beautiful woman called Amalia Franz resents this He resents everything that Karl has, but which he desires He covets his father s name and estates He wants to win the hand of Amalia So, he plots against Karl Karl himself seems to aid that venture While he is away from home, he gets into debt and runs away from the law Franz uses that and convinces his father to disinherit Karl Karl has plans of coming back home and hopes that his father will forgive him for his indiscretions But when he receives the letter from his brother Franz stating that his father has disinherited him, he is hurt and angry And before he knows what he is doing, he joins with his companions and starts a band of robbers and becomes a fugitive who is hunted by the law Franz meanwhile continues with his nefarious plots he wants his father, the elderly Count, to die, so that he can take over the estates, but the Count, eventhough feeble, has a sound constitution Using psychological threats and false news that his son Karl has died in a battle, Franz upsets the Count immeasurably that the Count dies in a shock Franz takes over his father s name and estates The household staff serves him loyally However, his plans to win Amalia come to naught Amalia spurns his advances and decides to be faithful to her supposedly dead fianc Karl Meanwhile, Karl, as the head of his band of robbers, has adventures that robbers have He saves one of his band members from near certain death and while saving him, burns down the whole town Karl, though he is a robber, is noble He doesn t want any money for himself and helps poor people in need He is a robber he kills, he burns but he is also kind One day he hears some news about Amalia and comes to his father s castle in disguise There he discovers the truth about how Franz was responsible for his father s death and how Franz usurped his rightful inheritance Karl is wild with anger What happens next Does Karl exact revenge What happens to Franz Does he reach the end that is reserved for all villains Do Karl and Amalia get married What happens to the band of robbers The answers to these questions form the rest of the story.There were many things that I liked about The Robbers The first thing I liked was the way the characters of Karl and Franz were portrayed Karl, though he is the noble hero, is also a robber Schiller doesn t shy away from portraying that part of Karl s personality Karl robs people, kills them, burns houses and towns Schiller doesn t condone that So, we see two sides of Karl the noble kind side and the ruthless robber side Karl is not a traditional, hero, but a complex character Franz, the villain, is quite complex too He is an atheist and a materialist Though I didn t him much it is hard to like a villain I loved many of the lines that he spoke They were insightful and profound My favourite lines were a soliloquy by him Francissoliloquy he is thy father He gave thee life, thou art his flesh and blood and therefore he must be sacred to thee Again a most inconsequential deduction I should like to know why he begot me certainly not out of love for me for I must first have existed Could he know me before I had being, or did he think of me during my begetting Or did he wish for me at the moment Did he know what I should be If so I would not advise him to acknowledge it or I should pay him off for his feat Am I to be thankful to him that I am a man As little as I should have had a right to blame him if he had made me a woman Can I acknowledge an affection which is not based on any personal regard Could personal regard be present before the existence of its object In what, then consists the sacredness of paternity Is it in the act itself out of which existence arose As though this were aught else than an animal process to appease animal desires Or does it lie, perhaps, in the result of this act, which is nothingafter all than one of iron necessity, and which men would gladly dispense with, were it not at the cost of flesh and blood Do I then owe him thanks for his affection Why, what is it but a piece of vanity, the besetting sin of the artist who admires his own works, however hideous they may be Look you, this is the whole juggle wrapped up in a mystic veil to work on our fears And, shall I, too be fooled like an infant It made me remember those famous lines from Paradise Lost which Mary Shelley quotes in the first pages of FrankensteinDid I request thee maker, from my clay, to mould me man Did I solicit thee from darkness to promote me Franz was a villain, but he was also intelligent, smart and philosophical, like the best of them are The next passage is probably spoiler ish, and so if you are planning to read the play, please be sufficiently forewarned Onething I liked about the story was the internal conflict that Karl undergoes towards the end of the story, when he has to choose between his band of robbers who have sworn loyalty to him and his sweetheart Amalia I have seen this scene in countless movies, but I think Schiller probably was the first to write this scene So three cheers to him There were two surprises at the end of the story One of them was unexpected but in a nice way The second one was also unexpected but it was not so nice and I felt that it was not required It just had shock value and I was upset with Schiller for doing that The ending of the story is interesting not the regular good guys win and the bad guys die kind of ending, but one which iscomplex than that One word on the translation One of the things I hated about the translation I read was that Karl was called Charles and Franz was called Francis Really Is that anglification of characters names really necessary What were you thinking, my dear Mr.Translator I enjoyed reading The Robbers I am happy that I have finally been able to read one of the great landmark plays of German literature By that born dramatist of penetrating clarity, Friedrich Schiller I would like to read some of his poems and his essays on aesthetics some day I will leave you with one of my favourite passages from the play This one is spoken by Karl to Schwarz, one of his robber companions Karlto Schwarz Why should man prosper in that which he has in common with the ant, while he fails in that which places him on a level with the gods Or is this the aim and limit of his destiny Brother, I have looked at men, their insect cares and their giant projects, their god like plans and mouse like occupations, their intensely eager race after happiness one trusting to the fleetness of his horse, another to the nose of his ass, a third to his own legs this checkered lottery of life, in which so many stake their innocence and their leaven to snatch a prize, and, blanks are all they draw for they find, too late, that there was no prize in the wheel It is a drama, brother, enough to bring tears into your eyes, while it shakes your side with laughter Have you read Schiller s The Robbers What do you think about it

  4. says:

    Note I did not read this in German, but I think that the needless anglicizing of Karl and Franz to Charles and Francis was unnotig Scheibe eines Pferdes You can look up the details German play 1781 Influenced Doestoyevsky, Nietzsche, et al It s hard not to have run across Schiller and Die Rauber But have you read it I had a little anxiety before beginning this one because it fell into the works that I would like to say that I ve read, but I m afraid will be a little dated fo Note I did not read this in German, but I think that the needless anglicizing of Karl and Franz to Charles and Francis was unnotig Scheibe eines Pferdes You can look up the details German play 1781 Influenced Doestoyevsky, Nietzsche, et al It s hard not to have run across Schiller and Die Rauber But have you read it I had a little anxiety before beginning this one because it fell into the works that I would like to say that I ve read, but I m afraid will be a little dated for my taste and prove me a Philistine Like Pushkin s Eugene Onegin And my fears were partially realized and partially unfounded.Realized The language itself was not always interesting, did not often move me There were some excellent sections, but I found much of it overly melodramatic I admit that I am missing some critical context in that I have almost no socio cultural knowledge of 18th, let alone 16th century Germany, but in terms of the language itself, I felt that someone kept switching on the one off avuncular shakespeare filter I also felt that some of what happened off stage, in between scenes, could have beeninteresting to see staged than say about a dozen pages of a supposed tyrant trying to convince a septuagenarian to commit a murder for him Unfounded The ideas and questions still reverberate What are the live options for someone long denied justice When one begins to operate outside of the conventional morality of society, is it possible to reintegrate oneself What are the products of a corrupt society How do our actions and guilt impact our notions of self 3.25 5

  5. says:

    Very similar to Shakespeare s dramas so I m wondering if that was the point.

  6. says:

    6 10 The Robbers reads like someone s Friedrich von Schiller s, if the cover s to be trusted attempt to make a German version of Shakespeare There are eloquent philosophical speeches and sometimes ecstatic language, characters that swear eternal vengeance on each other, and a tragic ending in which everything ends up covered in blood But it s a bitabstract and a bitgrim than the Bard, and seems a bitlike one of his contemporaries, perhaps a classed up version of one o 6 10 The Robbers reads like someone s Friedrich von Schiller s, if the cover s to be trusted attempt to make a German version of Shakespeare There are eloquent philosophical speeches and sometimes ecstatic language, characters that swear eternal vengeance on each other, and a tragic ending in which everything ends up covered in blood But it s a bitabstract and a bitgrim than the Bard, and seems a bitlike one of his contemporaries, perhaps a classed up version of one of John Webster s grand guignols.Of course, it s incredibly unfair to compare Schiller or anyone to Shakespeare, but the influence is so obvious that it s hard not to That comparison makes the play s flaws the thinness of its characters and its overtalkative nature stand outThat s not to say it s all bad it s a pretty decent read on its own, and from what I understand a Big Deal in German literature But it always feels a little incomplete, obscured by the shadow of its influences Maybe Harold Bloom was onto something after all

  7. says:

    The Robbers is a very strange play Plays by their nature are very talky, but this one has long monologues without a lot of action at the start There isdrama at the end In his preface, Schiller acknowledges the dramatic problems of the play as he says he meant it as a dramatic prose piece rather than a full blown stage play.The other strangeness in this play is that Schiller up ends our expectations, set by Shakespeare and other classic tragedians, of finding our initial assessments The Robbers is a very strange play Plays by their nature are very talky, but this one has long monologues without a lot of action at the start There isdrama at the end In his preface, Schiller acknowledges the dramatic problems of the play as he says he meant it as a dramatic prose piece rather than a full blown stage play.The other strangeness in this play is that Schiller up ends our expectations, set by Shakespeare and other classic tragedians, of finding our initial assessments of the characters refuted where innocence is rewarded and guilt is punished, the wicked are always stained and the good are always pure, and love wins in the end.In The Robbers , the innocent are killed, some of the guilty are rewarded, vengeance is deflected and love is finally shown as just a mistake This is pretty nihilistic stuff, but it does make for page turning reading because you definitely don t see it coming and I was surprised by how much Schiller defied expectations

  8. says:

    I really thought I would love this, but didn t Well, I did, insofar as it is the absurd, idealistic, raging play of an absurd, idealistic, raging youth, and is delightful in its na vet But I can t help thinking of the magnificent later Schiller, the Schiller of Maria Stuart and Die Jungfrau von Orleans, compared to which this play is a bit ranty Still, some wonderful moments, and I wish I could have been there in the theatre in the 1780s when it reduced grown ups to tears and inspired hoards I really thought I would love this, but didn t Well, I did, insofar as it is the absurd, idealistic, raging play of an absurd, idealistic, raging youth, and is delightful in its na vet But I can t help thinking of the magnificent later Schiller, the Schiller of Maria Stuart and Die Jungfrau von Orleans, compared to which this play is a bit ranty Still, some wonderful moments, and I wish I could have been there in the theatre in the 1780s when it reduced grown ups to tears and inspired hoards of young literate men to become bandits

  9. says:

    To this that you may be taught that strength grows with the occasion For which reason I never despair even when things are the worst Courage grows with danger Powers of resistance increase by pressure It is evident by the obstacles she strews in my path that fate must have designed me for a great man This is, it seems to me, a very familiar story Two brothers, one beloved and the other hideous, torn apart by the hideous one s jealousy He destroys his brother s life and tries to get the b To this that you may be taught that strength grows with the occasion For which reason I never despair even when things are the worst Courage grows with danger Powers of resistance increase by pressure It is evident by the obstacles she strews in my path that fate must have designed me for a great man This is, it seems to me, a very familiar story Two brothers, one beloved and the other hideous, torn apart by the hideous one s jealousy He destroys his brother s life and tries to get the brother s girl I don t actually remember reading it before but apparently I did At any rate, it is the sort of story you recognize anyway But it is a well told, nonetheless It interweaves lines from Homer and the Bible Creates villainous villains and broken heroes Throws in some moral grayness and consequences And ends on a note of tragedy worthy of the tale Very Robin Hood esque I also love this line from Amelia in her initial conversation with the perfidious Francis You have robbed me of a precious hour may it be deducted from your life Did a name pop to mind when you read that It did for me Pe ReviewI read this book once, when I was 14, and I only have a faint memory of sadness I do think I liked it though

  10. says:

    Die R uber,s rightfully considered to be a masterpriece of the the Sturm und Drang mouvement First performed in 1782, it had a great impact on romantic writers in Germany, France and England for the next seventy five years Victor Hugo s Ernani and Adam Mickiewicz s Konrad Wallenrod are two of the most successful works to revisit the major themes of the Die Rauber which are the need to reconcile the apparent conflicts between personal or family loyalties and those of a country or nation Two op Die R uber,s rightfully considered to be a masterpriece of the the Sturm und Drang mouvement First performed in 1782, it had a great impact on romantic writers in Germany, France and England for the next seventy five years Victor Hugo s Ernani and Adam Mickiewicz s Konrad Wallenrod are two of the most successful works to revisit the major themes of the Die Rauber which are the need to reconcile the apparent conflicts between personal or family loyalties and those of a country or nation Two operas Italian operas I briganti Mercadante 1836 and I masnadieri Verdi 1847 were also based on Die Rauber It was not until 1869 when Offenbach s parody Les brigands was staged that Europe s authors finally decided that it was time to move on and look for new sources of inspiration.Read this play It will be a great help in understanding the thematic concerns of grand opera in the nineteenth century

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