The Fox's Craft in Japanese Religion and Culture Shapeshifters Transformations and Duplicities Religion in History Society and Culture Outstanding Dissertations 7



➲ [Read] ➭ The Fox's Craft in Japanese Religion and Culture Shapeshifters Transformations and Duplicities Religion in History Society and Culture Outstanding Dissertations 7 By Michael Bathgate ➽ – E17streets4all.co.uk For than a millennium the fox has been a ubiuitous figure at the margins of the Japanese collective imagination In the writings of the nobility and the motifs of popular literature the fox is known as For than a millennium the fox Craft in MOBI ó has been a ubiuitous figure at the margins of the Japanese collective imagination In the writings of the nobility and the motifs of popular literature the fox is known as a shapeshifter able to assume various forms in order to deceive others Focusing on recurring themes of transformation and duplicity in folklore theology and court and village practice The Fox's Craft explores the meanings and The Fox's Kindle - uses of shapeshifter fox imagery in Japanese history Michael Bathgate finds that the shapeshifting powers of the fox make it a surprisingly fundamental symbol in the discourse of elite and folk alike and a key component in formulations of marriage and human identity religious knowledge and the power of money The symbol of the shapeshifter fox thus provides a vantage point from which to understand the social practice of signification.The Fox's Craft in Japanese Religion and Culture Shapeshifters Transformations and Duplicities Religion in History Society and Culture Outstanding Dissertations 7

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The Fox's Craft in Japanese Religion and Culture
  • Hardcover
  • 191 pages
  • The Fox's Craft in Japanese Religion and Culture Shapeshifters Transformations and Duplicities Religion in History Society and Culture Outstanding Dissertations 7
  • Michael Bathgate
  • English
  • 06 November 2016
  • 9780415968218

10 thoughts on “The Fox's Craft in Japanese Religion and Culture Shapeshifters Transformations and Duplicities Religion in History Society and Culture Outstanding Dissertations 7

  1. says:

    I purchased this book wanting to gain a historical perspective on foxes and their representation in Japanese culture Expecting a study focusing on tales as well as an in depth description of the Inarifox relationship I was left slightly disappointed Not that this is not an interesting read or serious book I did find the handful tales mentioned and their analysis interesting particularly the reference to weddings and the place of women in JP culture or the evolution of the fox’s representation during the Edo period If anything though the book itself is overly technical Since it is filled with technical terms and references to scholarly theories Structuralism linguistics and Think R Jakobson Saussure R Barthes and Levi Strauss to name but a few I would not recommend this work to anyone that does not have at least a fairly comprehensive knowledge of modern social sciences In each chapter the author blends western theories with Japanese folklore or rather “forces” western theories on Japanese folkloric narratives It felt to me that his main focus was to theorize the fox as a trickster and prove that western theories can work in this specific case Overall an interesting book for those that could be looking for a theoretical approach to tale analysis and may want to develop their own on different topics but uite disappointing for myself or a person looking for a folklore or historical study

  2. says:

    This book was not what I expected it to be I expected a collection of folk tales and characteristics of the foxes in Japanese cultureWhat I found was of a study searching for the shifting meanings of these foxes and the stories they feature eg from blessing ancestor to progenitor of a cursed lineage from divine agents to malicious fiends as well as interpretations of the myths symbols and development in the context of social economical change in Japan over the time Now while it wasn't what I expected it to be it was still uite interesting to read what different or sometimes very similar stories meant in different time periods and how the kami Inari and thereby the fox could stand for both what Japanese considered bad and good basically due to its connection with riceThis is also the first book ever where I read of a story about a man being transformed into a fox by a fox apparently This is extraordinary by itself since human transformation in general doesn't feature much in Japanese folklore it is usually animals demons or spirits who do so and if humans do transform they rather become monsters then animalsNow this book was far from perfect make no mistake about that While this book is fast paced and well written the author uses so many sophisticated words that some people might lose interest in reading because of it Also while the author's interpretations are interesting I had wished for in depth portrayal of the belief in foxes and Inari as well as into their powersIn addition I think the author was too uick to use western terms even if they clearly don't apply For instance he considers these foxes spirits and once even vampires but otherwise likened them to succubi in that case but this doesn't fit since the most famous fox story which he uotes and analyzes already involves the spirit of such a fox taking on the shape of a rock after it was killed So what? Was it the spirit of a spirit for him? Doesn't make much sense in my eyesAnd as interesting as the book is the author constantly uses spirit for beings like magical raccoon dogs foxes and tengu which is simply not correct Spirits are usually immaterial beings but all of these here are usually fully corporalAnd although I didn't get a collection of stories and such the range that was covered fox wives tricksters thieves retribution reward divine messenger deity wealth; technically this book is at its best when it directly interprets those stories makes me wonder why on earth so little modern comic book and movie authors use so little of it all I mean how many feature that foxes can even turn into inanimate objects?So for all its flaws this was a pretty enjoyable book The reading was uick it never bored me I learned a few knew things and the structure is good the chapters are not confusingly arranged or anythingI just wouldn't recommend it to people not used to a scientific language

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